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Nokia May Exit Digital Health Business

Posted on March 2, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

The digital health market has become phenomenally competitive over the last few years, with giants like Google and Apple duking it out with smaller, fast-moving startups over the choicest opportunities in the sector.

Even with a behemoth like Google, you expect to see some stumbles, and the Internet giant has taken a few. But seldom have we seen a billion-dollar company walk away from the digital health market, which arguably stands to grow far more. Still, according to a recent news report, that’s just what Nokia may be doing.

A story published in The Verge reports that the Finnish telecom giant has launched a strategic review of its health division. While Nokia apparently isn’t spilling the beans on its plans, the news site got a look at an internal company memo which suggests that its digital health business is indeed in trouble.

In the memo, The Verge says, Nokia chief strategy officer Kathrin Buvac wrote that “our digital health business has struggled to scale and meet its growth expectations… [And] currently, we don’t see a path for [the digital health business] to become a meaningful part of a company as large as Nokia.”

While it’s hard to tell much from a press release, it notes that Nokia’s digital health division makes and sells an ecosystem of hybrid smart watches, scales and digital health devices to consumers and enterprises. Its digital health history includes the acquisition of Withings, a French startup with a sexy line up of connected health-focused digital health devices.

This may be in part because it just hasn’t been aggressive enough or offered anything unique. In the wake of the Withings acquisition, Nokia doesn’t seem to have done much to build on Withings’ product line. Though much of the success in this market depends on execution, its current roster of products doesn’t sound like anything too exciting or differentiated.

It’s interesting to note that Buvac blames at least part of the failure of its digital health excursion on Nokia’s size. That doesn’t seem to be a problem for industry-leading companies like Apple, which seems to be carving out its digital health footprint one launch at a time and cultivating health leaders along the way. For example, Apple recently partnered with Stanford Medicine launch an app using its smartwatch to collect data on irregular heart rhythms. Arguably, this is the way to win markets and influence people — slow and steady.

In the end, though, Buvac is probably right about is digital health prospects. Nokia’s seeming failure may indeed be attributed to its sprawling portfolio, and probably an inflexible internal culture as well. The moral of the story may be that winning at the digital health game has far more to do with understanding the market than it does with having very deep pockets.

No Doubt Digital Health Has Gone Mainstream

Posted on April 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The big digital health news yesterday was that Nokia was acquiring Withings. There’s no better sign of the massive market opportunity that is the digital health space. It also seems to show a huge pivot in the business model of Nokia. Long a phone manufacturer, they’re now using their massive war chest and understanding of the mobile industry to enter into the digital health space in a big way with this acquisition.

From the Withings perspective, I’ll be interested to see what Nokia can do as far as distribution of the Withings product lines. Withings has had a strong presence in the digital health space for a while, but there’s definitely a land grab happening between all the various players in the industry. We’ll see if having Nokia around can accelerate their acquisition of market share.

I’ll be interested to see where Nokia takes this as well. Is this the first of many digital health acquisitions? Withings has a great digital health product line, but we’re seeing an explosion of health sensors that could compliment their product line. Nokia has much deeper pockets than Withings, but are they willing to acquire companies to build up their war chest of health sensors? It will be fun to watch it play out.

I wonder if Nokia’s ties to Microsoft will be a help or a hindrance to Withings. Certainly they’re going to have to hook into the iOS and Android platforms. They already are, but will this acquisition make those integrations harder? Will they miss out on opportunities with these 2 major phone types because of the new connection to Nokia?

I’m always interested which large companies are starting to enter the digital health space. We’ve seen a ton of work from large brands like Adidas, Nike and Under Armour for example. iFit has been working really hard on the space and they come out of NordickTrack. Fossil acquired Misfit. I’m sure there are bunch more I missed, but such an extraordinary diversity of companies working in the space.

Who else do you think will enter the space? Any companies you think that will become the leaders?

Health IT Hazards, Selecting the Right EHR, and Withings Wireless Scale – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on December 2, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Health IT Stands Out In Health Technology Hazards List

The Top 10 Health Technology Hazards list was recently released by ECRI. And this year, two of the hazards that made the list are health IT related – patient/data mismatches in EHRs and other HIT systems, and, interoperability failures with medical devices and health IT systems. Anne Zeiger predicts that more HIT issues will top this list in the future.

Patients Accessing Online Medical Records Use More Services

A new study revealed something interesting — patients who use online access to medical records are likely to use more clinical services than those who do not. The Journal of the American Medical Association drew this conclusion after studying members of Kaiser. Kaiser has had a patient portal in place since 2006, which made it an ideal candidate for this study.

EMR and EHR

10 Tips for Selecting the Right EHR

In the market for a new EHR? Or perhaps just implementing one? This post highlights 10 tips on selecting the right EHR for your practice, as presented by Insight Data Group. Some of the suggestions include making sure the EHR is easy to use and customized, and use the government’s money to pay for your EHR.

Meaningful Healthcare IT News

Social and Mobile Continue to Converge in Healthcare

An interesting infographic is shown and discussed in this post. It is called “How Health Consumers Engage Online,” and reveals some interesting facts about the digital and health world. According to it, more people in the United States own a smart phone than a tooth brush, and 23 percent of people use social media to follow the health experiences of a friend. This definitely presents some fascinating data that is worth reading.

Smart Phone Health Care

New Withings Wireless Internet Scale Hits the Market

A new scale was recently released, and it does more than just tell a person how much they weigh. It tracks numerous variables, including BMI, and can be synced to various mHealth apps. There is also an app that goes along with the scale as well. It is a bit pricey at over $100, but it definitely “tips the scales” when it comes to scales.

Smart Phone Enabled Thermometer Approved By FDA

The “Raiing” is the newest in smart phone technology. It’s a high-tech, yet easy-to-use, thermometer, designed for iOS devices. It is placed under the armpit, and can actually track a person’s temperature over time. If a temperature reaches a certain number, an alarm will go off on the connected smart phone. This can help give parent’s peace of mind, as a sick child sleeps.

New Withings Wireless Internet Scale Hits the Market

Posted on November 26, 2012 I Written By

Scales sure have come a long way from the old spring-driven models that I grew up with.  I remember thinking how cool it was when I saw my first digital readout scale.  Compared to what is available now, those old digital scales are about as modern as a stone tablet.

The new Withings Wireless Internet scale offers a lot more than just a person’s weight.  It also instantaneously provides a person’s BMI and provides tracking capability with all kinds of different functions.

The scale can be synced to numerous existing mobile apps to accent fitness tracking, weight management, or even just to keep friends, family, or your doctor informed.  It also has its own app that allows the user to set goals, receive coaching, or generate historical reports.

While this is all very cool the price tag seems a little steep to me.  The Withings WS-30scale is available now from Amazonfor $129.95.  But, for someone who is serious about monitoring their weight, this could be a very useful tool.