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The Key to Successful Health Wearables and Apps

Posted on March 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Yesterday I took part in the Dell #DoMoreHIT Healthcare Think Tank event. This was my 4th year participating in the event which always provides a rich discussion of important health IT topics.

This year, one of the topic areas was around wearables and how wearables are part of healthcare. We had a great discussion including insights from Stacey Burr, Digital Sports Managing Director at Adidas, which I found very helpful in my understanding of how a brand like Adidas is approaching wearables.

As the discussion progressed, I made the comment that I’ve come to realize that for a wearable or health app to be extremely successful it’s going to require one of two things: Fun or Invisible.

I want to be careful on the fun angle. I’m not talking about an app that applies gamification. Sure, gamification might be part of it, but people want to have fun. If a wearable or health app can’t make something fun, then more people are going to use it. In our current society we’re spoiled by so much stimulus and so we’re always interested in new ways to have fun. If you can incorporate some health or wellness into that, then we’ll like it even more. However, we’ll keep doing it because it’s fun, not because of the health and wellness benefits.

The other option is for the wearable or health app to be invisible. Say what you want about society (and there are some notable exceptions), most people don’t care about their health. At least they don’t care enough to really do something about it. Sure, we all want to be healthy, but not enough to inspire action. I’ve seen it over and over again with apps. That’s why the health wearable or app has to be invisible and do its work without the need of intervention by the human.

Dr. Wen Dombrowski (Better known as @HealthcareWen) argued that there were other reasons too and then explained that her GPS wasn’t fun or invisible, but she used it. I think she’s right that there could be some areas where an app could provide a specific utility that could become popular. I just have yet to see that happen in the health space. Plus, what I find interesting about her GPS example is that GPS has tried to become more and more invisible as well. I love that my phone now knows my calendar and the GPS to where I’m going and tells me that I’m late and gives me an easy link to get the navigation. So, even GPS is heading the direction of invisible as well.

Medical Device Security – Where Is the Finger Pointing?

Posted on October 23, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If a picture is worth a thousands words, the above picture is worth about 10,000. I think this picture is best summed up by saying that the medical device industry is a heavily regulated industry. You can see why EHR vendors don’t want to be regulated by the FDA. It would get pretty crazy.

This image also illustrates to me why a company that’s built an FDA or medical device compliance capability has something of real value. Navigating the process is not easy and it helps if you’ve been there and done it before.

As to Dr. Wen’s comment on the tweet. There are a lot of challenges when it comes to medical device security. Definitely no antivirus and many are running on old operating systems that can’t be updated. We’re going to have to put some serious thought into how to solve problems like these in future medical devices.

Taking a Healthy Risk: Best Practices and Creative Use of Social Media in Healthcare

Posted on January 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I mentioned previously that I was a part of a panel on healthcare social media at the Digital Health Conference in New York City. The video from the healthcare social media panel was just posted on YouTube and so I thought I’d share it with those who weren’t able to attend the Digital Health Conference. It was a pretty diverse panel that offered a number of different perspectives and insights in how to use social media in healthcare. The names of the panelists are listed below the video.

Panelists from left to right:
John Lynn — Founder, HealthcareScene.com and Physia.com (@techguy @ehrandhit)

Wen Dombrowski, MD — Healthcare Innovation, Informatics, and Social Media Consulting, Resonate Health LLC (@HealthcareWen)

Amy Dixon, BSN, RN, HNB-BC — Nurse Blogger, Visiting Nurse Service of New York (@amyrnbsn @VNSNY_News)

Brian Ahier — Health IT Evangelist, Mid-Columbia Medical Center; President, Gorge Health Connect, Inc. (@ahier @MCMCHealth)