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Inaccurate EMR Data, Patient Engagement, and Studycure: Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on September 23, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

EMR and EHR

Primary Docs See Hope For Stronger Financials With EMR

A recent study revealed that 51 percent of doctors felt the EMRs would help solve their problems. In fact, some believe that it will help them financially as well. Their theory? Better coding and documentation will lead to more efficiency and reduction of costs. Is this a worth-while belief, or are these doctors setting themselves up for disappointment?

EMR Data Often “Innaccurate” Or “Missing”, Study Says

EMR adoption is expected to reach nearly 80 percent of healthcare organizations by 2016. This may come as a relief to some who believe that EMRs eliminate data errors that come with paper-based systems. However, EMRs may not be as accurate and complete as everyone might hope. Symptoms on patients who die quickly may not be recorded, and accuracy can depend on if a patient was treated at night or during the day. Teamwork may be the solution to eliminating EMR-based errors.

Hospital EMR

Your Facebook-like Health and Status Feed

Should healthcare practices integrate a social media-like system, incorporating real health time and status feeds, into clinical workflow? In theory, it would be a great idea. However, as with Facebook and Twitter, not every status gets read. This may get information out quickly, but maybe not to who needs to see it.

Happy EMR Doctor

Patient Engagement in the Digital Era

Patient Engagement has gone from eye-to-eye contact to Googling health questions. While this may seem like patient engagement is becoming less personal, it can be positive. Patients can be more involved in their health care, and take control of it. Dr. Michael West discusses that and more in his article this week.

Smart Phone Health Care

Studycure: Experiment Your Way to Better Health

Need some extra motivation to meet goals? Studycure is part social experiment, part motivation, and aims to help people meet their health goals. By implementing a texting program that sends reminders throughout the day and questions concerning your goal, it analyzes after a certain period of time if the methods used to meet a goal are being met. Goals are customizable, can be shared with friends and family, and others goals can be tracked and used as inspiration.

Studycure: Experiment Your Way to Better Health

Posted on September 11, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Next on the list on our journey through a list of five personal data innovations to watch that I talked about last week is Studycure.

Now, before I get everyone too excited, this website is in beta, so it’s a bit rough. You have to request an invitation, but I got mine within about five minutes of registering. Despite all that, I love the idea of Studycure.

To put it simply, it’s part motivation to get healthier and happier, part experiment. Sometimes, when you are trying to accomplish a certain goal, such as weight loss, it’s hard to know what is working, and what is not. Studycure users take a basic, scientific procedure — an if, then statement — and apply it to different “theories” concerning their health. You can select any amount of time you want to test out your if, then experiment, and at the end of that time period, the data is analyzed and helps you to make a decision on that particular theory. As I’m writing this, it sounds kind of confusing, but it makes total sense. Here’s a video from the website, which makes things far more clear:

There are quite a few different sections, like sleep, diet, exercise, and spirituality. Before creating my own tasks, I decided to see what other experiments were going on. By doing this, I was able to get a better feel for the website. People can put a “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” on experiments that are listed, and you can join ones that have already been created. Because a lot of the experiments that were already created were along the same lines as what I was going to do, I just joined those. The more the merrier, right? You can invite friends and family to join in, or just to see progress. You can even share the data with healthcare professionals.

Here are the four I decided to try out for seven days:

IF: I turn off my computer at 11pm, THEN: I won’t feel tired in the morning

IF: I make a ‘to-do’ list, THEN: I will be less stressed

IF: I eat breakfast, THEN: I’ll lose weight

IF: I exercise for 20 minutes or more each day, THEN: I will feel happier

From what I gather, users receive email or text reminders throughout the day, encouraging them to keep going. As the video mentioned, articles and studies that are discovered concerning your topics of choice will be recommended, as well as studies you can participate in. At the end of your “experiment,” you can determine whether or not it really worked or not by using the data compiled by Studycure.

I’m excited to see if this works. It’s definitely an interesting idea and I think there is a lot of potential for expansion. I could see doctors using Studycure to try and determine patterns in patients lives, and help them eliminate (or create) certain habits. Only time will tell if Studycure will take off. Have you joined or created any experiments on Studycure?