Other mHealth Apps for the Apple Watch

Posted on April 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m already on the recorder that I don’t think that the Apple Watch is going to be a game changer for healthcare. After it’s launch I still believe that to be the case. In fact, I’m not sure if it will be a game changer for anything (not just healthcare). It’s an interesting novelty item and some elements of the interface are cute. The marketing is great as would be imagined from Apple, but they’re selling the sizzle and not the steak.

With that perspective out of the way, I was intrigued by this MacWorld article that lists 5 outside the box health apps for the Apple Watch. They basically said outside the box was something beyond heart rate (not a very high bar). Here’s what they listed:

WebMD – This is not their database of education. It’s a medication reminder, tracking and medication schedule app.

Skin – This app lets you scan your skin for areas of concern and then you can preview the scan on your watch. The app also evaluates the skin. I guess that’s one way to track changes in your skin over time.

ReSound Smart – This app controls your smart hearing adds and adjusts the volume, noise filters, etc. It also uses geotagged locations to adjust the settings automatically (something that likely works with your phone too).

Clue – This app helps women track their periods and get a full overview of their cycles. The watch app is mostly for accessing the data as opposed to entering the data.

BACtrack – Connects to a smart beathalyzer to give you an idea of your blood-alochol level. Also, reminds you after 15 minutes to do another test to get a more accurate result.

The ReSound Smart app is the most interesting one to me on this list. Although, my biggest problem with it is that it has a limited use case. You have to have hearing aids and you have to have smart hearing aids. I’m sure it’s a great product for people with hearing aids and no doubt I’d love something like it if I was in that situation but I’m not so it’s hard for me to really measure its value.

The rest of them didn’t seem all that interesting. Medication reminders is going to work well on the watch, so it’s good that WebMD is doing it, but we’re going to see that from 100 providers. Plus, is it that much better on the watch than to the smartphone itself?

I love interesting apps like this list provides, but I’m not seeing any game changers on this list of Apple Watch health apps.