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Applying Geospatial Analysis to Population Health

Posted on June 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Megan Williams wrote a very interesting piece called “Geospatial Analysis: The Next Era of Population Health” in which she highlighted Kaiser’s efforts to use geospatial analysis as part of their population health efforts. Here’s her description of their project:

This means using data to inform policy adjustments and create intervention programs that lead to meaningful change. One of the best examples of this lies with healthcare giant Kaiser Permanente. In April, they launched a database that gave researchers the ability to examine patient DNA and bump it against behavioral and environmental health factors. The goal of the project is to pull information from half a million patients and use it to build one of the most “diverse repositories of environmental, genetic and health data in the world,” which could then be used to inform research around conditions including diabetes and cancer and their relationships to issues including localized violence, pollution, access to quality food and other factors.

This type of effort from Kaiser is quite incredible and I believe will truly be part of the way we shift the cost curve on healthcare costs. One challenge to this effort is that Kaiser has a very different business model than the rest of the healthcare system. They’re in a unique position where their business benefits from these types of population health efforts. Plus, Kaiser is very geographically oriented.

While Kaiser’s business model is currently very different, one could argue that the rest of healthcare is moving towards the Kaiser model. The shift to value based care and accountable care organizations is going to require the same geospatial analysis that Kaiser is building out today. Plus, hospital consolidation is providing real geographic dominance that wasn’t previously available. Will these shifting reimbursement models motivate all of the healthcare systems to care about the 99% of time patients spend outside of our care? I think they will and large healthcare organizations won’t have any choice in the matter.

There are a number of publicly and privately available data stores that are going to help in the geospatial analysis of a population’s health, but I don’t believe that’s going to be enough. In order to discover the real golden insights into a population, we’re going to have to look at the crossroads of data stores (behavioral, environmental, genomic, etc) combined together with personal health data. Some of that personal health data will come from things like EHR software, but I believe that the most powerful geospatial personal health data is going to come from an individual’s cell phone.

This isn’t a hard vision to see. Most of us now carry around a cell phone that knows a lot more about our health than we realize. Plus, it has a GPS where all of those actions can be plotted geospatially. Combine this personally collected health data with these large data stores and we’re likely to get a dramatically different understanding of your health.

While this is an exciting area of healthcare, I think we’d be wise to take a lesson from “big data” in healthcare. Far too many health systems spent millions of dollars building up these massive data warehouses of enterprise health data. Once they were built, they had no idea how to get value from them. Since then, we’ve seen a shift to “skinny data” as one vendor called it. Minimum viable data sets with specific action items tied to that data.

We should likely do the same with geospatial data and population health and focus on the minimum set of data that will provide actual results. We should start with the skinny data that delivers an improvement in health. Over time, those skinny data sets will combine into a population health platform that truly leverages big data in healthcare.

Where do you see geospatial data being used in healthcare? Where would you like to see it being used? What are the untapped opportunities that are waiting for us?

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Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT? – Post #HIMSS16 Blab

Posted on March 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can watch the recording of our discussion in the video embedded below:

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business and Dell is sponsoring my trip to participate in the Dell Healthcare Think Tank. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT-blog

On Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with the Chief Medical Officers of both Samsung and Dell. As we recover from HIMSS 2016, we’ll be sharing the positive things we saw, heard and are doing in healthcare IT. Far too many people at HIMSS are focusing on the challenges and downside of healthcare IT. In this live video chat, we’re going to focus our discussion on the innovations and amazing technologies that are making healthcare better for everyone.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Plus, considering the size of HIMSS, the three of us likely only saw a small portion of the amazing innovations and technologies that were on display at HIMSS. Please join us on blab and share things you found at HIMSS that everyone should know about.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Also, you can see Dr. Nick and myself on the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event March 15th on Twitter using the #DoMoreHIT hashtag and the Livestream.

Learning More About Samsung’s Work in Healthcare and #HIMSS16

Posted on February 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

As we head into the 2016 HIMSS Annual conference, Healthcare Scene sat down with David Rhew, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung. In our discussion we talk about Samsung’s role in healthcare and the HIMSS16 conference. We also talk about a wide variety of topics including: the digital hospital, the connected home, BYOD, mobile device security, and wearables to name a few. No doubt Samsung is playing a bigger and bigger role in healthcare. Learn more in this video conversation embedded below:

After talking about Samsung Healthcare’s plans and expectations for the HIMSS16 conference, David Rhew, M.D. and Healthcare Scene opened up the floor for other live viewers to join the conversation in what we call the “After Party.”

In this discussion we talk about the challenge of standards and mobile device interoperability and then we were joined by Dr. James Legan and Dr. Charles Webster who share some first hand experiences and insights into how the right medical devices can dramatically change the physician and the patient healthcare experience along with Dr. Rhew sharing his experiences. Find out all the details in the video embedded below:

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

Should We Be Looking to Children to Learn About Remote Patient Monitoring?

Posted on February 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

In a recent blog post, Taylor Mallory Holland wrote about how “Remote Patient Monitoring Isn’t just for Adults” including the following:

Remote patient monitoring has become a popular way for healthcare providers to ensure that patients stay healthy at home. More than two-thirds of hospitals and health systems have already deployed these solutions, according to Spyglass Consulting, mostly to monitor adults with chronic diseases.

She then went on to talk about how Children’s Health in Dallas is using Vivify Health’s care management platform and Samsung Galaxy tablets to get children out of the hospital faster, but still be able to remotely monitor their patients.

While it’s true that home health monitoring is a hot topic with the chronic, elderly patient, it might behoove us to spend a lot more time exploring the opportunities that are available with children as well. It turns out that patients that are children can teach us a lot about how to design the right software and systems to truly make a patient’s life better.

Lately it seems like every health IT solution wants to talk about patient engagement. Remote patient monitoring is the epitome of patient engagement, no? You’re literally engaging with the patient in one of their most sacred places: their home. However, one of the biggest challenges related to patient engagement is that far too many patients don’t care enough to actually engage.

This is why remote patient monitoring with children is so powerful. As a parent of four, I can attest to you that there’s nothing a parent won’t do for the health of their child. The duty and responsibility you feel for your child’s health is real. This often gets the bad rap of helicopter parent (which can be bad if taken too far), but in a healthcare situation you want a “helicopter” parent that’s totally involved in the care of their child. In fact, if we really believe in patient engagement, then we need parents that are involved and participating in the care their child receives. Luckily, most parents are totally engaged in their child’s health and that provides a tremendous opportunity for healthcare.

I’m not suggesting that we shouldn’t be working on remote monitoring tools for patients in every age group. Remote patient monitoring can be a valuable thing regardless of age. However, we may want to spend a bit more time looking at the way patient engagement happens with younger patients since their parents are already interested and engaged. No doubt we can apply some of those lessons and learnings to the older patient populations as well.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare