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Galaxy Will See You Now

Posted on May 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We all know how dramatic our lives have changed thanks to technology. Many of us remember the impact a computer in every home had on our lives. Now we’re seeing that same transformation happening as we all start carrying a smartphone in our pocket. Each of these technologies has opened up new worlds of possibilities in our personal lives and also for healthcare. I think we’ll see a similar transformation with the introduction of voice recognition and AI (Artificial Intelligence).

When we start talking about AI, most of us probably think about the movies they’ve seen where AI was on display. Hollywood’s use of AI in movies often makes it so it doesn’t feel very real. However, if you have a smartphone, then you’ve probably used AI. I know my first real experience with AI was on my Samsung Galaxy S3. I remember my wife and I going on a date and we spent the majority of our date asking “Galaxy” various questions. We got surprisingly good answers including easy access to the show times for the movie we ended up seeing.

Most of us have had this type of experience with AI on our smartphone. It’s pretty magical, but I must admit that I didn’t use it that often when it was just on my phone. There were a few cases it was really useful like when I was driving and needed directions to a gas station. The hands-free access to information was extremely powerful, but it wasn’t part of my daily experience. However, that changed for me when I introduced an always on AI solution in my home. Now it’s become a daily part of me and my family’s life.

How does this apply to healthcare? It’s becoming very clear that the home is the healthcare hub of the future. Think about having always on tablets, smart TVs, and other devices positioned throughout your home where you can easily access your health information, medical knowledge, and healthcare providers. That’s powerful. Plus, those devices and attached sensors are starting to easily monitor you, your environment, and your health. This two way connection creates an extremely powerful combination that will change the way we view healthcare.

Certainly there are practical examples of home health services that exist today including monitoring recently discharged patients, monitoring seniors, connecting patients with doctors, and much more. We’re seeing all of these connected home health services happen more and more every day. Just what we’ve already begun to implement will improve the healthcare we provide dramatically. However, we’re just starting to explore what AI and new technologies can do for healthcare. The best is still to come.

How long will it be before we can sit at home and we can ask our tablet or smart TV “Galaxy, how’s my blood pressure doing today?” Or “Galaxy, can you schedule me a telemedicine visit with my doctor to discuss my prescription refill?” Not to mention Galaxy proactively reaching out to you to motivate healthy decision making.

What’s so incredible is that executing these ideas and many more aren’t that farfetched given the powerful technology that exists today. We still need to connect a few dots, but it’s all extremely doable from a technical perspective.

What’s going to be harder is the cultural shift and change of mindset. However, that’s happening already and it will accelerate over time. I’m sure my kids wouldn’t think twice about asking our TV or tablet for a doctor’s appointment and then having the doctor streamed right to the TV or their tablet. They probably wonder why it’s not already possible.

Even while we wait for this more automated AI future, there are still big home health things happening on smartphones and tablets. Each of those things is a building block to this exalted future. I’m ready for Galaxy to see me now. In fact, in some ways he already does. Are you ready?

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Google Fit and Other Fitness Trackers

Posted on February 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve always been intrigued by the various fitness trackers. I’ve never been that excited about their pure healthcare value, but I do believe that the amount we move (or don’t move) matters to our health. So, it makes since to track how much we move as one element of your health.

The problem I’ve had with all the fitness trackers I’ve used is that they end up in a drawer far too quick. In fact, I could never reliably wear one. My wife did better and made it a few weeks, but I just hated having a device attached to me. So, it never worked for me. (Side Note: HIMSS16 has a fitness challenge and they’re even accepting donations of fitness tracker devices you have gathering dust in your drawer.)

The closest I’ve come to a fitness tracker working for me is my cell phone. I was excited when my Samsung Galaxy S5 had the S Health app loaded on it and would track my steps and it could even do my heart rate. It was novel to see my step counts and see the trend over time. I was always excited when I’d go dancing and my step count would go through the roof and blow away all the goals that it had set for me.

I’ve since switched to the Google Nexus phone which has Google Fit built in. It has a similar step tracker and I definitely turned on Google Fit when I started with the phone. However, then I never heard or saw any notifications about it. I did’t really even realize it was on. Then, this week I got the notification from it that Google Fit was going to be disabled to save my battery since I hadn’t opened it in a long time (I can’t remember how many months they said).

What can I say? I totally forgot that it was even tracking me and it didn’t tell me that it was doing it. I do remember getting a notification or two that I’d had an active hour or something, but I’d just give myself a pat on the back and swipe off the notification. I guess that’s not considered using the app.

The other reason I probably didn’t care as much about the Google Fit tracking is that I knew that it was only tracking a small part of my movement since the cell phone is often with me, but not always. I work from home and so when I’m home I take my cell phone out of my pocket and it sits on my desk all day. That means it’s not tracking any of my movement during most days. I also play a lot of sports and I don’t want my cell phone in my pocket while I play. I guess that’s why all the Fitness trackers are these little devices that you could potentially wear while playing. Although, that feels like work and for what value?

Many have been dealing with this for years. What’s interesting is that I’ve been watching it for years as well and not much has changed. Is it nice that Google Fit is tracking my activity with almost no effort from me? Definitely, but with all the gaps in data it’s collecting, is that data really all that meaningful?

Would love to hear other people’s experiences with these trackers. Is there something new that’s changed your perspective on things?

What’s Next for Smartphone Innovation?

Posted on November 13, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

GigaOm recently reported that Apple is working on a curved screen smartphone and pressure-sensitive touch censors for future iPhones.

Samsung had already announced a curved screen smartphone as is demonstrated in this video:

As I think about these new smartphone innovations, I don’t see anything real game changing with this technology. Certainly I understand that the biggest game changers in technology are often when a company combines a bunch of relatively innocuous innovations into one tight package. I believe the iPhone is the perfect example of this principle.

With that said, I have to feel a little disappointed by even the small innovations that are coming out in the latest smartphones. Bigger screens, curved glass, and pressure sensitive sensors don’t do much for me. I’d love to hear what you think about the pace of smartphone innovation. What could they innovate that would really be a game changing innovation for healthcare?

The hardware piece aside, I think on the smartphone software side there is still a ton of potential for innovation coming very soon. We’ll see where it takes us. I’m not expecting huge hardware innovation in smartphones anytime soon. When it comes to eyewear computing like Google Glass, that’s a different story.

CDC Launches New Mobile App

Posted on January 14, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

It was only a matter of time before the CDC developed a mobile app — and it looks like it is jam-packed with features. Unfortunately for me, it isn’t compatible with my mobile device, but I was able to read enough about it, to make me wish I could download it. The CDC is one of my go-to websites, so I’m sure the mobile app is just as good.

Available for most Android and iOS devices, this is free for all. Some of the features include:

  • CDC Health articles: These are written by “subject matter experts and health communicators,” and are on a variety of topics. 
  • Disease of the week: This feature has quizzes, prevention tips, images and videos pertaining to a certain topic. I like to think of this as “convince yourself that you have this disease” of the week. Okay, not really. But I could see myself doing that.
  • CDC Vital Signs: This contains information that relates to public health topics, and “calls to action” about them. It has information on everything from seatbelt use to HIV testing to obesity.
  • Newsroom: Simple enough, this contains press releases from the CDC. They often release important information, so this might be helpful to have on hand.
  • Podcasts

For those accessing the CDC app from a tablet, it has been optimized to work better there. It can be used on the iPad, and the Google Play Store tested (and fount it to work well) on the Google Nexus 7″, Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1″, Amazon Kindle Fire, Motorola Xoom 10.1″, Samsung Galaxy 1, 7″, and the Samsung Galaxy 2, 7″.

From what I can tell, this is a great resource. For anyone that follows the CDC on a regular basis, this is a must-have. I think it would be interesting if the CDC would add some kind of notification system — if there’s an outbreak of illness or disease on someone’s area, they would be instantly notified. That could end up causing widespread panic, but I think it could be a great feature. Overall though, I wish I could download this app to my phone, because it does have a lot of different functions.

As I mentioned, this is a free app available for both Android and iOS devices.