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Galaxy Will See You Now

Posted on May 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We all know how dramatic our lives have changed thanks to technology. Many of us remember the impact a computer in every home had on our lives. Now we’re seeing that same transformation happening as we all start carrying a smartphone in our pocket. Each of these technologies has opened up new worlds of possibilities in our personal lives and also for healthcare. I think we’ll see a similar transformation with the introduction of voice recognition and AI (Artificial Intelligence).

When we start talking about AI, most of us probably think about the movies they’ve seen where AI was on display. Hollywood’s use of AI in movies often makes it so it doesn’t feel very real. However, if you have a smartphone, then you’ve probably used AI. I know my first real experience with AI was on my Samsung Galaxy S3. I remember my wife and I going on a date and we spent the majority of our date asking “Galaxy” various questions. We got surprisingly good answers including easy access to the show times for the movie we ended up seeing.

Most of us have had this type of experience with AI on our smartphone. It’s pretty magical, but I must admit that I didn’t use it that often when it was just on my phone. There were a few cases it was really useful like when I was driving and needed directions to a gas station. The hands-free access to information was extremely powerful, but it wasn’t part of my daily experience. However, that changed for me when I introduced an always on AI solution in my home. Now it’s become a daily part of me and my family’s life.

How does this apply to healthcare? It’s becoming very clear that the home is the healthcare hub of the future. Think about having always on tablets, smart TVs, and other devices positioned throughout your home where you can easily access your health information, medical knowledge, and healthcare providers. That’s powerful. Plus, those devices and attached sensors are starting to easily monitor you, your environment, and your health. This two way connection creates an extremely powerful combination that will change the way we view healthcare.

Certainly there are practical examples of home health services that exist today including monitoring recently discharged patients, monitoring seniors, connecting patients with doctors, and much more. We’re seeing all of these connected home health services happen more and more every day. Just what we’ve already begun to implement will improve the healthcare we provide dramatically. However, we’re just starting to explore what AI and new technologies can do for healthcare. The best is still to come.

How long will it be before we can sit at home and we can ask our tablet or smart TV “Galaxy, how’s my blood pressure doing today?” Or “Galaxy, can you schedule me a telemedicine visit with my doctor to discuss my prescription refill?” Not to mention Galaxy proactively reaching out to you to motivate healthy decision making.

What’s so incredible is that executing these ideas and many more aren’t that farfetched given the powerful technology that exists today. We still need to connect a few dots, but it’s all extremely doable from a technical perspective.

What’s going to be harder is the cultural shift and change of mindset. However, that’s happening already and it will accelerate over time. I’m sure my kids wouldn’t think twice about asking our TV or tablet for a doctor’s appointment and then having the doctor streamed right to the TV or their tablet. They probably wonder why it’s not already possible.

Even while we wait for this more automated AI future, there are still big home health things happening on smartphones and tablets. Each of those things is a building block to this exalted future. I’m ready for Galaxy to see me now. In fact, in some ways he already does. Are you ready?

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Should We Be Looking to Children to Learn About Remote Patient Monitoring?

Posted on February 24, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

In a recent blog post, Taylor Mallory Holland wrote about how “Remote Patient Monitoring Isn’t just for Adults” including the following:

Remote patient monitoring has become a popular way for healthcare providers to ensure that patients stay healthy at home. More than two-thirds of hospitals and health systems have already deployed these solutions, according to Spyglass Consulting, mostly to monitor adults with chronic diseases.

She then went on to talk about how Children’s Health in Dallas is using Vivify Health’s care management platform and Samsung Galaxy tablets to get children out of the hospital faster, but still be able to remotely monitor their patients.

While it’s true that home health monitoring is a hot topic with the chronic, elderly patient, it might behoove us to spend a lot more time exploring the opportunities that are available with children as well. It turns out that patients that are children can teach us a lot about how to design the right software and systems to truly make a patient’s life better.

Lately it seems like every health IT solution wants to talk about patient engagement. Remote patient monitoring is the epitome of patient engagement, no? You’re literally engaging with the patient in one of their most sacred places: their home. However, one of the biggest challenges related to patient engagement is that far too many patients don’t care enough to actually engage.

This is why remote patient monitoring with children is so powerful. As a parent of four, I can attest to you that there’s nothing a parent won’t do for the health of their child. The duty and responsibility you feel for your child’s health is real. This often gets the bad rap of helicopter parent (which can be bad if taken too far), but in a healthcare situation you want a “helicopter” parent that’s totally involved in the care of their child. In fact, if we really believe in patient engagement, then we need parents that are involved and participating in the care their child receives. Luckily, most parents are totally engaged in their child’s health and that provides a tremendous opportunity for healthcare.

I’m not suggesting that we shouldn’t be working on remote monitoring tools for patients in every age group. Remote patient monitoring can be a valuable thing regardless of age. However, we may want to spend a bit more time looking at the way patient engagement happens with younger patients since their parents are already interested and engaged. No doubt we can apply some of those lessons and learnings to the older patient populations as well.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

‘Watson’ Analytics to Being Used to Increase Smartphone, EHR capabilities

Posted on May 31, 2011 I Written By

I for one thought it was really cool that they developed a computer system that could outperform people on Jeopardy.  I am not ready to have my own robot at home, though that would reduce the housework I would have to do, but I love to see people trying to push their limits, and develop things that have never been done before.  That is exactly what the people at IBM are doing.

The full article can be found here, but here are some of the most amazing things that they are developing based on the “Watson” technology:

IBM has doubled the number of healthcare solution architects and technology specialists working at the Solutions Center, tasking them with helping physicians connect smartphones, tablets and other devices to EMRs while also helping healthcare providers build new solutions for remote patient monitoring.

Meanwhile, more than a quarter (27 percent) of specialists and primary care physicians use a tablet PC or similar device nowadays. As clinicians adopt smart devices at five times the rate of the general population,

Using clinical voice recognition from Nuance Communications and medical terminology management from Health Language, IBM is working to improve the mobile EMR experience through voice recognition and technology that provides understanding of medical text, similar to the way Watson analyzed hundreds of millions of pages of text from books, encyclopedias and periodicals to compete on Jeopardy!

With the rapid adoption of electronic medical records and other health IT applications, the amount of data associated with health care providers in North America is expected to reach close to 14,000 petabytes by 2015.

Now for those of you, like me, that don’t know how much a petabyte is, it is equivalent to 1024 terabytes which is equal to about 13.3 years of HDTV content.  It is incredible how fast this industry is growing.  Information has always been the source of power in healthcare, and now we are in a position to use more, and more accurate, information than ever before.  What is truly incredible is that most of it can be accessed in the palm of your hand.