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Scanadu to Shut Down Scout Medical Device Per FDA Regulation

Posted on December 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The famous Qualcomm Tricorder prize winner and IndieGogo crowdfunding success, Scanadu, has just hit some major bumps in the road. In fact, you might say they lost their engine completely. After winning the X Prize foundation’s tricorder competition, they went on to raise more than $1.6 million on IndieGogo from 8509 backers.

After shipping the product, Techcrunch just broke the news that Scanadu was now planning to disable the Scout’s functionality. Yes, that’s right. People paid $149-269 for the Scanadu Scout and now Scanadu is going to brick all of the devices. Here’s their official comment to Techcrunch:

“From the beginning of the campaign, this was an investigational device that was part of a study which has now reached its endpoint with data collection for the study ending in November 2016. FDA regulations require that all investigational studies be brought to closure and their respective devices be deactivated. As a result, we will deactivate the Scanadu Scout® devices by May 15, 2017.

Interestingly, the Scanadu website, Twitter, Facebook, etc are all quiet. In fact, most of them have been quiet since April. What hasn’t been quiet is customers anger towards Scanadu. That’s true on social media, but also in the IndieGogo comment section where Scanadu had raised $1.6 million.

You can imagine people’s anger. Their expensive device will now be useless. As one commenter pointed out, someone bought 100 of them. That person will now essentially have 100 expensive bricks. In the comments, people are calling for a class action lawsuit, refunds from IndieGogo and outrage at the company doing this to them. The most salient point is that it’s hard to imagine anyone ever buying a product from Scanadu again after something like this occurs. One commenter suggested the following:

The consent doc also says: “If you have any questions about your rights, call the Scripps Office for the Protection of Research Subjects at (858) 652-5500. ” [Note: Scripps is performing the study based on the Scanadu data.]

Some people in the comments are even commenting that there’s no such FDA regulation. I’m not an expert on FDA regulation, but my gut tells me there’s more to this story than we know today. I could easily see how there could be an FDA regulation that required a company to shut down devices that made claims they couldn’t achieve and therefore put people’s health in danger. I’m not sure if this is what’s happening with Scanadu, but when there’s smoke there’s usually fire.

I think we all loved the romanticized idea of a medical tricorder. Haven’t we all wanted one since we first saw it portrayed on Star Trek? Scanadu was trying to make it a reality, but it seems their efforts have fallen flat. This is a good warning to everyone else out there. FDA compliance is no joke. Even winning an X Prize, a successful crowd funding campaign, and raising $35 million in funding doesn’t guarantee success.

Innovation in healthcare is hard!

The Speed of Innovation in Mobile Networks – Enabling The Future of Healthcare

Posted on September 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been attending the CTIA Super Mobility Conference in Las Vegas today and it’s been eye opening to say the least. The efforts they’re making to make wireless networks work for the IOT (internet of things) and even things like drones is incredible. Much of the buzz at the event has also been around the coming 5G networks.

Matt Grop EVP and CTO at Qualcomm offered this comparison of the progression from voice to 4G LTE to 5G:

Later, Rajeev Suir, President and CEO of Nokia, then suggested that we need 5G networks because the applications of the future will require it. This is an interesting statement to consider. Today during my Healthcare API discussion the need for faster connections came up and illustrated how healthcare could benefit from this additional speed. In fact, the innovations in healthcare are likely going to be facilitated or even demand the faster speeds to become a reality.

Think about neural networks and genomic medicine. That type of processing isn’t going to happen on the phone. The data for those won’t be stored on your phone, laptop, or desktop. It’s going to be stored and processed in the cloud and then sent back to your phone. The exchange of data that is going to need to happen is going to be huge and we’re going to need really fast networks to enable this future.

Think about all of the sensor data that is going to be reporting up to the cloud to be processed by these neural networks and pharmacogenomic processing engines. We’re not going to plug in to transfer this data. It’s going to use these ubiquitous wireless networks that currently connect our smart phones.

This all certainly leads to a fascinating future. I love the way technology can open the door to opportunities that would have never been thought possible previously. New high speed mobile networks like 5G are an example of that. The only question is if even 5G will be fast enough.

HIMSS 2016 Moved from Mobility to Devices

Posted on March 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Thinking back on a week at the HIMSS Annual Conference, I think it’s fair to say that the industry has moved beyond the smart phone and moved on to new devices. That’s not to say that mobile doesn’t matter, but mobility has just become a feature of most software the same way we talk about a cloud application. No one buys cloud, but they might look at whether the application is a cloud application. The same is true for mobility. You don’t buy mobility, but you might want to know if the application is available on mobile devices.

With that said, there are still many that use the term mobile health to describe any devices that could be used in your health. That’s a pretty broad definition since it could include apps on your smartphone, the watch on your wrist, the Fitbit in your pocket, or some other sort of sensor attached to your body in some way. This leaves off ingestibles and implantables which I guess could apply to this broad definition of mobile health as well.

I believe 2016 was a breakout year for consumer health device companies at HIMSS. While in previous years I might see a number of these consumer health device companies at CES, very few of them really had any presence at HIMSS. HIMSS 2016 had a lot of these device manufacturers with much larger presences. This includes large companies like Philips (who killed it on the #HIMSS16 hashtag) and Qualcomm (of course they acquired CapsuleTech which has always had a good presence at HIMSS), but also a large smattering of smaller device companies scattered throughout the HIMSS 2016 exhibit hall floor.

I can’t say that I saw anything new from these companies, but HIMSS isn’t really the place for them to launch new products. Most of these companies save product launches for other events like CES or Mobile World Congress. Instead, their presence at HIMSS shows an interesting evolution in the journey of these generally consumer focused health devices. HIMSS is about the healthcare enterprise. What’s still not clear to me is how many of these consumer health devices can find a foothold in the enterprise healthcare world. However, it’s notable that so many are trying.

Solving Medical Device Interoperability – Is Qualcomm Building that Platform?

Posted on September 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If you’ve spent some time in the mHealth and mobile health space (which are basically the same thing), then you’ve likely run into Qualcomm. They’ve made a big investment in that space with their Qualcomm Life initiative together with their 2Net platform that helps home health devices connect and share data. In many ways it made a lot of sense for a wireless provider (mostly chips from my understanding) to get involved in this space since it was a way for them to sell more chips. It seems like every new medical device needs some wireless technology embedded in it. On the other hand it sometimes felt awkward since Qualcomm really doesn’t directly sell products to healthcare organizations or consumers.

Many people probably missed the announcement that Qualcomm Life acquired Capsule Tech. A lot of people in healthcare don’t know about Capsule Tech. Even fewer probably know about Qualcomm Life. However, Capsule Tech has done a great job building a business around medical device management. Capsule Tech is known as the black box under the hospital bed that captures all the medical device data in a hospital room and sends that data where it needs to go. They’ve recently expanded beyond the black boxes into things like data analytics, but at their core they’re all about collecting and sharing medical device data.

When you think about it from that perspective, that’s kind of what Qualcomm Life has been doing with home health devices and their 2Net platform. They’re collecting and sharing home health data where it needs to go.

As you look at a combined company, you can easily see a platform for medical device data starting to form. It will take some time for them to make it a reality, but you can see how Capsule together with Qualcomm Life could become the hub of medical device data. Now they have expertise in hospital grade medical devices and more patient focused home health devices as well. I can’t think of any other organization that’s merging the two like they could do. Some specific healthcare organizations are doing it on their own, but not a vendor.

Kevin Phillips, VP of Marketing and Product Management at Capsule Tech, told me that many of their customers were asking them for medical device solutions that reached into the home. It makes sense that a hospital using Capsule Tech for their enterprise medical devices would turn to them for their home health efforts as well. Now that Capsule Tech is part of Qualcomm Life, they’ll have a suite of solutions they can make available to their hospital customers.

From the 2Net partner perspective, Capsule Tech brings a large number of healthcare organizations to the table that could now consider buying their wireless health solutions. The key is going to be how well Qualcomm can integrate their 2Net platform with Capsule Tech. Capsule Tech has integrated with pretty much all of the major EHR vendors out there. Can Qualcomm leverage these EHR integrations to the benefit of their 2Net partners?

I asked this very question of Dr. James R. Mault, VP and Chief Medical Officer of Qualcomm Life. He danced around the subject citing the EHR blocking that was highlighted by ONC earlier this year and how many EHR vendors and health systems have made it really hard to create these type of integrations. However, Dr. Mault also described how there’s been some major changes recently in this regard thanks to the push towards value based care and reduced hospital readmissions. Organizations are realizing they have to start opening up. I’d describe his answer as hopeful, but realistic when it comes to the challenges they face with EHR integrations. If Qualcomm Life could offer their partners a path to the EHR through Capsule Tech, that would be a real coup.

At the end of the day, the proof is in the pudding. This conceptual medical device data sharing platform across the healthcare enterprise and home health sounds great. I’ll be interested in how Qualcomm Life and Capsule Tech do at executing it. Are hospitals really ready to purchase the home health products? Will these solutions help them in their value based reimbursement, ACO, and/or reduced hospital readmission efforts? It’s going to be interesting to watch and see which Qualcomm Life partners are of interest to the hospital market. I told them I’d follow up at HIMSS 2016 to see how they’re doing.

Qualcomm Toq Smartwatch

Posted on November 26, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you will remember my post on the Qualcomm Toq Smartwatch announcement. I just got word that I’m on the list to get one of these watches. I can’t wait to try it out. In fact, I’m even more excited after watching this video demoing the smartwatch:

I can see a number of times I would love to have this smartwatch. I love having my calendar on it. Sure, I could pull out my phone, but a smartwatch right there seems a lot nicer for some reason. I also love the notification aspect of it. I often miss messages on my phone, but this would be easier to check and see if I need to address something or not. I also can see me reading my Twitter feed on it as well.

Of course, from a health perspective, I’m looking forward to see what health apps are built into the watches. I wonder if it and smartphones will replace all the other hardware based fitness trackers for example. Fred Wilson, a NYC VC, has a great post on Software vs Hardware startups. He asks an interesting question about whether the innovation will happen in hardware or software.

What do you think of the smartwatch?

Sprint and Techstars Mobile Health Accelerator

Posted on October 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Not that we needed another mobile health accelerator, but I was really intrigued by the companies that are backing this mobile health accelerator. First, besides loving healthcare IT, I also love the startup community. I consider myself more of an entrepreneur than a journalist, but no doubt I have parts of both in me. As part of that love, I addictively read a venture capitalist, Brad Feld’s blog. So, I was really intrigued by his post announcing the new “Powered by TechStars” Mobile Health Accelerator with Sprint.

I also find it interesting that this is the second mobile health accelerator that is Powered by TechStars (Nike+ Accelerator was the first).

We’ll see what comes out of the accelerator. I have a lot of confidence in the TechStars mentorship approach to accelerators. Plus, Sprint has some deep pockets and it seems every telco is looking at how to do mobile health. Although, I was a bit surprised to see Sprint’s name on this since I haven’t seen their name at the various mobile health events I’ve attended. Instead, that’s usually been dominated by Verizon, AT&T, and Qualcomm. We’ll see if that changes at this year’s mHealth Summit.

If you want to be part of this mobile health accelerator in Kansas City, they’re accepting applications.

Smart Watch Announcements – Qualcomm’s Toq and Samsung’s Galaxy Gear

Posted on September 4, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We posted about the rumored iWatch from Apple a while back, but today Apple was beat to the punch with both Qualcomm and Samsung announcing smart watches today. The smart watch movement could mean a lot for mobile health.

Qualcomm’s smart watch offering is called the Toq and isn’t planned to go on sell until the middle of next month. Plus, Qualcomm calls it a technology demonstration instead of a commercial endeavor. That means they’re looking to partners to carry this torch. Qualcomm isn’t turning into a consumer electronics company. Here’s AllThingsD’s description of the smart watch:

It features several different watch faces, including one that matches the time with upcoming calendar appointments, and another that displays both time and weather information. The Toq can also control the phone’s music player, as well as display text messages and send one of several preset replies. Clearly designed as a companion to a smartphone, the watch settings are controlled from an app that runs on an Android smartphone.

Watch owners can also get other types of Android notifications that would normally flash on their phone screen. Users can decide which apps’ notifications are shown on the watch. Qualcomm will also make available a developer tool kit that will let interested companies create their own “applets” for the watch.

At the same time, the combination of the Mirasol display and other power-saving features means that the device can be always-on (there’s no on-off switch) and still get several days of use between charges.

I think this is best described as a second screen for your smart phone. Although, it’s a second screen that’s always on thanks to the Qualcomm Mirasol display technology.

The Samsung Galaxy Gear smart watch will launch on Sept 25 in more than 140 countries and available worldwide in October. Here’s AllThingsD’s description of the device:

Designed to be a smartphone companion, the Android-based wearable features a stainless steel frame with a 1.63-inch, 320 by 320 pixel touchscreen and rubber straps that come in six different colors, including orange, yellow and white.

For now it appears that the Galaxy Gear is designed to work only with the Galaxy Note 3 and the Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition tablet, which were also announced. Once connected via Bluetooth, the watch can alert you to incoming texts and emails. A feature called “Smart Relay” also mirrors what you’re seeing on your smartphone to the watch.

With a built-in mic, you can make and receive phone calls and draft messages, create calendar appointments and more using Samsung’s S Voice command system. The watch’s strap also has an integrated 1.9-megapixel camera. But before you get excited about living out your dream as a spy, the camera makes a shutter noise that can’t be disabled.

That’s a huge problem that the Galaxy Gear only works with the latest Galaxy Note products. I imagine this will change once Samsung is able to push out an update to the Samsung S3 and S4’s. If they can’t do that, then this device is really going to suffer. The battery life on the device is estimated at 25 hours and will launch with more than 70 compatible apps including the RunKeeper app.

The most exciting part of both of these announcements is that we’re just getting started with the Smart Watch technology. I’m not sure how this is going to evolve, but I love the always on feature of a smart watch. I also love the idea of it being a second screen. Plus, with an accelerometer on the watch and likely more bio sensors to come, there’s a great opportunity for mobile health apps.

Google Glass Incubator for Healthcare – Glassomics

Posted on August 16, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week I spent a lot of time at the SXSW V2V conference in Las Vegas. While at the conference I had the chance to meet and talk with Kyle Samani, founder of Pristine, where we discussed Pristine’s work in bringing Google Glass to healthcare. He’s particularly focused on bringing Google Glass to healthcare, but I have little doubt that Google Glass will be valuable to many parts of healthcare (I’m sure Kyle would agree).

I recently read about a new Google Glass incubator on iMedicalApps. Here’s a short quote from the article:

“We are going to see a revolution going forward of wearable computational devices, with Google Glass being the first one out of the gate,” says Chief Innovation Officer of Palomar Health, Orlando Portale.

This prediction is the reason Palomar Health and Qualcomm Life have teamed up to build an incubator for developers called Glassomics.

The incubator aims to provide platforms and eventually, hospital venues to create medical apps for computer glasses, smart watches, and wearable devices for patients.

Qualcomm has been a big player in the mobile health space for a while, so it’s no surprise to see them following the mobile health trend into Google Glass. I think it’s interesting they are calling it Glassnomics when it seems the incubator has a much larger focus than glass into all wearable devices.

I’m still not completely sold on Google Glass in particular, but I have little doubt that it has made a whole new category of tech product main stream. We’ll see if Google Glass becomes the dominant platform or if a startup company comes along and makes a better version. Either way, I’m excited at the potential of Google Glass in healthcare.

Is the Tricorder Device a Reality?

Posted on June 4, 2012 I Written By

Back in January, Qualcomm and the X-Prize Foundation announced a contest that offered $10 million to anyone that could develop a tricorder similar to the one that was used in Star Trek.  I wrote back then that I didn’t think it was that unrealistic, and after reading a recent article, I am even more convinced that we will see such a device in the very near future.

The article was written by Mark Mills of Forbes.com who addresses how social media will lead to the next revolution: Social Medicine.  I’ve written about the use of social media and how beneficial it can be to healthcare on so many levels, but he describes it better than I ever could.

The company that he talks about, Scanadu, definitely seems to have the write idea in terms of using social media to make the tricorder a reality.  You can see a short video below that gives a great visual of what they are trying to accomplish in making healthcare more accessible and efficient for everyone.

How awesome would it be to be able to take pictures of a rash or injury that your kid had, add a few details of how they are feeling, and within seconds get a pretty good idea of what is wrong with them.  If it was an emergency you would know quickly and be able to get them the help they needed.  In general, an emergency is relatively obvious, so to me the greater value is in preventing unnecessary trips to the doctor when the condition will simply pass with time.

In this world of instant gratification it would be awesome to to be able to get more regular updates on your health.  The one major risk here is that people will rely solely on their smartphone and attached devices rather than going to a professional when they really need it.  The beauty there is that it would be super easy to send an email or phone message to the patient’s doctor letting them know what is going on with their patient so they could step in if needed.

It will be incredibly exciting to see how Scanadu and other companies develop modern technology into the social medicine of the future.  Do you think there is any limit to what is possible in the future of healthcare?

 

Qualcomm Tricorder X Prize Offering $10 Million Prize to Developers

Posted on January 17, 2012 I Written By

We all remember those awesome little tricorders from the Star Trek series that could analyze a person’s level of health almost immediately.  All the doctor had to do was push a button and he immediately knew exactly what he needed to do to help the person.

Qualcomm and the X Prize Foundation have announced a development competition designed to create just such a device.  The two CEO’s of the respective companies, Dr. Paul Jacobs, Qualcomm Foundation Chair and Qualcomm Incorporated Chairman and CEO, and X PRIZE Foundation Chairman and CEO Dr. Peter Diamandis, announced during the keynote address at CES that the prize would be $10 million dollars.

Compared to the other development competitions that I have previously covered, this one is in a “whole different galaxy.”  While the idea may seem a little far-fetched, it really does not seem that unrealistic to me.

We already have portable devices for blood pressure, blood glucose levels, and even EKG’s.  How much of a stretch is it to simply combine all of those devices together?  With that kind of prize, this competition is sure to bring out some serious talent who are committed to making the science fiction of my youth a reality.

There is way more information than I could possibly cover here, so please check out their website where you can find all of the details of the contest including press releases, and how to enter.