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Healthcare Dashboards, Data, and FHIR

Posted on March 30, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in a dashboard society. We love our dashboards! We have mechanisms to track, analyze, and display all sorts of data at our fingertips any time of the day or night and everywhere we turn. We like it that way! Data is knowledge. Data is power. Data drives decisions. Data is king.

But what about healthcare data? Specifically, what about YOUR healthcare data? Is it all available in one place where you can easily access it, analyze it, and make decisions about your health? Chances are, it’s not. Most likely, it’s locked up inside various EHRs and many tethered (read: connected to the provider, not shareable to other providers) patient portals you received access to when you visited your doctors for various appointments. In some cases, the information that is there might not be correct. In other cases, there might not be much data there at all.

How are you supposed to act as an informed patient or caregiver when you don’t have your data or accurate data for those you are caring for? When health information is spread across multiple portals and the onus is on you to remember every login and password and what data is where for each of these portals, are you really using them effectively? Do you want to use them? It’s not very easy to connect the dots when the dots can’t be located because they’re in different places in varying degrees of completeness.

How do we fix this? What steps need to be taken? Aggregating our health information isn’t just collecting the raw data and calling it a complete record. It’s more than being able to send files back and forth. It’s critical to get your data right, at the core, as part of your platform. That’s what lets you build useful services, like a patient dashboard, or a provider EHR, or a payer analytics capability. A modern data model that represents your health information as a longitudinal patient record is key.

Many IT companies have realized HL7 FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) is the preferred way to get there and are exploring its uses for interoperability. These companies have started using FHIR to map health information from their current data models to FHIR in order to allow information exchange.

This is just the beginning, though. If you want robust records that support models of the future, you need a powerful, coherent data model, like FHIR, as your internal data model, too.  Then take it a step further and use technologies similar to those used by other enterprise scale systems like Netflix and LinkedIn, to give patients and caregivers highly available, scalable, and responsive tools just like their other consumer-facing applications. Solutions that are built on legacy systems can’t scale in this way and offer these benefits.

Our current healthcare IT environment hasn’t made it easy for patients to aggregate their health information or aggregated it for them. If we want to meet the needs of today and tomorrow’s patients and caregivers, we need patient-centric systems designed to make it easy to gather health information from all sources – doctors, hospitals, laboratories, HIEs, and personal health devices and smartphones.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Seven Types of HIMSS18 Attendees: An Exhibitor’s Perspective

Posted on March 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The HIMSSanity is over and everyone’s departed Las Vegas and headed for home (or SXSW). This year, my company was an exhibitor in Hall G at HIMSS. Our booth was on the main aisle, or “the thoroughfare” as those of us in the booth liked to call it. As such, I noticed some trends in the types of booth visits we encountered this year during HIMSS. These visits can be summed up into seven different types.

Integration on the Brain. “I need something to connect my disparate systems together.” Whether it’s EHR-to-EHR, EHR-to-other systems, PHR-to-EHR, or many Health IT combinations, there was no shortage of requests at HIMSS for a system or platform to make these connections happen more seamlessly. Inquiries about integration and connecting various technologies came up more frequently at our booth than any other topic at the show. These conversations were great for MedicaSoft because we can help them solve integration problems.

Partnership Hustle. “I make APIs, products, or provide services to complement your software offering. I think we’d make great partners.” HIMSS is certainly a place to find synergies and begin conversations for potential win-win situations for companies who want to partner together and go to market. Sometimes these meetings are the start of a perfect “meet cute.” Other times, they fall short. Either way, there are lots of folks out there with a wide variety of products and services making their rounds and searching for perfect business partners.

Swag Gatherer. “I came here for the swag.” You know this person. This person has no desire to interact with you. They’re not sure what your company does and many times they don’t care to ask. This person wants to collect as much free stuff at the conference as possible. Sometimes they are annoyed when you don’t have a giveaway. You know you’ve encountered a swag gatherer by their refusal to make eye contact and how fast they exit your booth once they’ve snatched up whatever swag or tchotchke you have to offer.

IT Spy. “I must find out what the competition is doing right now, let me pretend I’m in the market for IT products and booth hop.” We’ve all seen it. We know when it’s happening. It can be hilarious when the spying company tries to act like they are NOT doing this. It’s pretty obvious. I’m on to you. My only request? Be nice about it. We’ll show you what we have. You don’t have to be obnoxious or play dumb. We are happy to share.

Things You Don’t Need. “You really need our product or service even if you think you don’t need our product or service.” Everyone has this happen at one point or another. Someone comes by and really wants to sell you something you don’t need. Sometimes they politely go on their way. Other times they linger on, refusing to acknowledge that you don’t need their product or service. Sometimes being upfront doesn’t help and they continue to launch into their sales pitch anyway. You have to give these folks credit, they really are trying to sell.

Neighborhood Friendly Booth Staff or First-time HIMSS-goer. “I just thought I’d say hello.” This could be neighboring booth staff coming over to say hello. It could also be an exhibitor or attendee who’s there for the first time. In either case, these are friendly people who want to ask questions. They are getting their bearings for the show and trying to learn as much as possible. Many times they ask for advice or directions.

Match Made in Heaven. “We’re looking to buy or replace our patient portal, PHR, EHR, or integration platform.” The crème de la crème of conference attendees. This person has done their research. They know what they want and what they want is what you offer! These types of meetings leave you jazzed for the rest of the conference and eager for post-conference follow-up. This type of conference attendee actually answers your emails and phone calls when you follow-up because they have a genuine interest in what you do and how you can help them solve their IT problems or challenges.

HIMSS18 exhibitors and attendees, what other types of booth attendees did you see this year at the show?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Real Problem with High Healthcare Costs

Posted on February 27, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The rising cost of healthcare in the U.S. is something that nearly everyone experiences on a regular basis. Looking at the trend over the last few decades, there is an eye-opening surge in cost. There’s a great article/table by Kimberly Amadeo that outlines health care costs by year from 1960 to 2015. The cost per person for health care in 1960 was $146. In 2015, the cost per person was $9,990, over 68 times higher than it was in 1960.

The trend shows no sign of slowing; 2018 costs have only gotten higher. The National Conference of State Legislatures cited a figure from a Kaiser Employer Survey stating that annual premiums reached $18,764 in 2017. Costs for people purchasing insurance on an exchange or privately increased even more.

Increasing healthcare costs impact everyone. Why have costs gotten so high? Wasn’t the Affordable Care Act supposed to make coverage more affordable? Instead, many are faced with even higher insurance premiums for themselves and their families. Sometimes that equates to having to make difficult choices in care. And should people have to decide whether or not they can afford to seek care or treatment?

Many people want to blame insurance companies or hospitals or lobbyists or politicians. In truth, it’s a complex issue. And one of the core reasons it’s so hard to dissect is that there is a real lack of data – cost and price information, and clinical information on care quality and outcomes. Nobody has all of the data in one place. Without all of the data, the real problem or problems can’t be seen. If a problem can be guessed, it can’t be fixed. As in the Wizard of Oz, the real drivers are lurking behind the curtain; worse, the data that describes the drivers is splintered and located in different places, waiting to be collected in a way that reveals the whole truth.

How can health IT help? Are there ways that we can help solve the data problem and reduce high healthcare costs? Electronic Health Records can help gather the data. Adding claims data to complete, longitudinal patient health records can also help. Connecting PHRs, EHRs, and claims data together can help bridge the data gaps and tell more of a complete story. Until we have that story, the industry will continue to operate in siloes. Costs will continue to rise. And people will have a harder time seeking out the care they need.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Opportunity for Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) to Untangle Health Records

Posted on February 6, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

As the government’s Meaningful Use incentive program accelerated the adoption of Electronic Health Records, it also increased the use of patient portals and PHRs to meet MU patient engagement measures. You see this today when you’re offered a portal login at your doctor appointments. Other encouraging trends developed around the same time:

  1. Studies proved that engaged patients tend to exhibit more positive health outcomes at lower costs.
  2. Interest increased among patient populations to be involved in their health and wellness, including a desire to see (and even contribute to) their electronic medical records.
  3. Technology innovations flourished to support health (wearables, health devices, applications, etc.).

Despite these trends and the relative success of MU-driven deployments, the patient portal and personal health record landscape leaves much to be desired for their primary users and audience – patients. Many of these tools were created simply to satisfy MU requirements and while they do this, they don’t completely tie together patients’ complex health histories, include data from multiple providers, or travel with the patient from visit to visit. Instead, patients have many different portals – a different one from every different provider. Who wants 10 different portals? Nobody has time for that!

Patients need help assembling a single view of their health records. HIEs are unique in that they work with many different health systems, hospitals, and providers in their regions. HIEs represent an opportunity to be a true integrator of health information between providers and their patients. This can be a regional solution now, and with efforts like the Patient Centered Data Home (PCDH), there is greater opportunity for HIEs to share data across state and regional lines, further expanding their reach and extending real benefits to patients who want their data in one place.

HIEs can leverage their unique position into a meaningful benefit for patient by first creating a single patient record or universal health record (UHR). This UHR or platform works seamlessly with PHRs. By making PHRs available to providers in their exchange, they can then share health data among every provider they link up with and the connections grow from there when you add in PCDH connections in other regions and states. Once there is a platform in place that is truly interoperable, sharing data between providers, patients can start using PHRs that have useful, relevant health data from all of their providers. HIEs can then start building in other capabilities like analytics, population health, care quality metrics, and more.

A patient’s medical journey involves multiple providers and different physical locations as their lives and health evolve. Their health information – in a single, universal health record – should evolve with them. HIEs can play a significant role in making that happen.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/26 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft on the topic of “Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a statistic stating that roughly 117 million people have one or more chronic health conditions. One in four people has two more chronic conditions. That is so many people! It’s 2018 and there are tons of innovative technologies out there. Why aren’t we doing a better job of managing our health conditions?

In a recent blog, I posted that chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record or patient portal to link wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What changes in healthcare technology need to be made to more effectively treat and manage patients with chronic conditions?

Join us to talk about patient portals and chronic disease management during this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Would you (or do you) use technology to help manage your health and wellness? Why or why not? #HITsm

T2: Effectively managing chronic disease can involve changing habits and forming good habits. What are some ways IT can help patients form and maintain good habits? #HITsm

T3: What’s a feature you wish patient portals had that they currently do not? #HITsm

T4: If patient portals collected data so providers could participate in MACRA/MIPS more seamlessly, would you be more apt to encourage their use in your organization? #HITsm

T5: Does your employer provide you a PHR as an employee benefit? If so, does it motivate you to be an engaged patient? #HITsm

Bonus: What are the benefits of having a complete personal health record that you can access anywhere? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
2/2 – From Makerspaces to Virtual Spaces: How 3D Changes Everything…
Hosted by Chuck Webster, MD (@wareFLO)

2/9 – The Role of HealthIT in Driving Payer Provider Employer Collaboration
Hosted by Heather Lavoie (@HSLavoie) from @Geneia

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – #HIMSS18
Hosted by #HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors

3/2 – Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare
Hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management

Posted on January 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

Half of all U.S. adults, roughly 117 million people, have one or more chronic health conditions. 1 in 4 people have two or more chronic conditions. As a nation, we need some help addressing the chronic disease epidemic. Many patient portals today give patients access to pieces of their health information – lab results, for example – and some will flag upcoming appointments or refill a prescription, but where are the tools and the data in a portal to actually help patients manage chronic conditions, thereby improving their overall health and wellness? Sadly, many patient portals provide a very narrow view, with few opportunities to link data to actions to results in a way that closes the loop between patients and caregivers. Without a complete view of a patient’s health measures, wellness goals, and plans of action – and the tools to manage them – it is very difficult to connect health and wellness to address the whole patient.

Chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record to link both wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What does it take to improve and maintain wellness? First, you need patient engagement. You need motivated patients who want to do a good job of actively tracking their conditions and working toward wellness goals. How do you convince a chronically ill patient to do this? Start by offering a tool that’s easy for them to track their data – complete with a workflow and user interface that makes it a breeze to enter and distill information at a glance and when they are on the go. Use technology similar to what patients use in their daily lives on their smart phones and laptops. Give patients tools to understand their health and take action based on how they are doing and what their health goals are! Provide a portal that allows the integration of popular wearable devices and lets the patient decide who should have access (Spouses? Caregivers?) to help them enter and manage their information.

Effectively managing chronic disease requires changing poor habits and forming good habits. Sometimes people need a gentle nudge or a push outside of the exam room. A platform that can send out reminders, gamify the experience, and even call a patient can go a long way in helping steer chronic disease patients in a more positive wellness direction. It’s not all about reminders, either. Texts and calls informing patients when they are doing a good job managing their daily wellness habits can also help.

Beyond helping patients, there’s an added benefit to coupling wellness capabilities with a PHR for providers – it has the ability to not only affect chronic disease factors, but to collect the data providers need to participate in the Quality Payment Program; the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). To quickly review, the Quality Payment Program allows clinicians to be rewarded financially for providing high-quality and high value care through Advanced Alternate Payment Models (APMs) or MIPS that are based on various measures. These measures can be integrated into the PHR, allowing physicians to track their patient populations, run reports, submit information to the Quality Payment Program, and receive merit payments.

What are your thoughts? Would you use a PHR to manage a chronic condition you are experiencing? Would you encourage your loved ones to use one? As a provider, how do you feel about a PHR making it easier for you to track MIPS/MACRA measures?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Future of Healthcare Rests on the Backs of Our Ability to Influence Behavior

Posted on May 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This morning I was pondering the future of our healthcare system and the constantly changing and shifting world of healthcare reimbursement. Some observations are undeniable. Our current system is flawed and not sustainable. Something has to change.

As I look at all the changes happening in healthcare, I came to one major realization. Every program to reduce the cost of healthcare rests on the back of our ability to influence patients’ choices.

The future of health insurance companies hinges on their ability to change patients’ behavior. Looking at ACOs and MACRA, doctors reimbursement is going to be tied directly to the choices their patients make (or don’t make). Employers that are looking to lower their healthcare costs are going to invest in programs and technologies that ensure their patients are making healthy choices.

While many healthcare IT companies fall short of this goal, we do see some that are going to play a major role in influencing patient behavior. Take something as simple as a patient portal. Can access to your medical records influence your behaviors? Can access to your doctor or a nurse through a patient portal help influence the decisions you make? Absolutely. Do they go far enough? Absolutely not, but they’re a start.

Take a look at telemedicine. Will easy access to a doctor change our behavior? Could telemedicine mean that we choose to be seen by a doctor earlier as opposed to delaying a visit to the doctor because it’s too painful to schedule an appointment and go into the doctor? Absolutely. Plus, telemedicine is just one simple example of how we’re making a visit easier. Online self scheduling could influence this as well. A whole new wave of messaging apps and provider communities are forming which allow us to get “health care” remotely.

As I’ve written before, my fear is that most healthcare IT companies don’t go deep enough into the behavior change and instead focus mostly on process optimization. Behavior change is a surprising byproduct for some, but is certainly not their intention. In fact, that’s true for most of the examples I describe above.

It becomes more and more clear to me every day that the real breakout companies in healthcare are going to be those who figure out how to influence patients’ behavior. That includes influencing them the 98% (or whatever the correct stat is) of time that patients spend outside of the exam room. Every reimbursement effort is going to be focused around it.

The real challenge for these companies is going to be tracking and quantifying the value they created. It’s hard to track attribution when it comes to a patient’s health. It’s so complex that it’s easy to incorrectly assess who or what is responsible for a patient’s improved health. Plus, it’s extremely hard to quantify the benefit of these behavior changes. A company focuses on influencing patients’ behaviors is also going to have to get really good at tracking the benefit of that influence and attribution of what influenced the patient.

These are extremely challenging opportunities. Healthcare is full of them. I already see some companies heading down this path. I’m excited to see which ones really break through.

Can Patients Be Trusted?

Posted on August 14, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

“Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain!”  This was how Dr. CT Lin, CMIO at University of Colorado Hospital & Health Sciences Center, opened his talk at the Healthcare Forum.  Dr. Lin’s premise was that we have kept healthcare information hidden from patients for far too long.  Giving patients access to their medical record does not create confusion and extra work for providers, but instead there is strong evidence in Dr. Lin’s research that patients are highly engaged and satisfied with access to their record and it does not create added burden on providers.

While the mystique of the all knowing, all powerful doctor is a strong one, healthcare is changing.  We’re quickly moving from the all knowing, no mistake doctors, to a more realistic paternal collaboration between doctors and patients.  No doubt this change is a hard shift in medical culture.  Take a simple look at the 5th century BC Hippocratic Oath [emphasis added]:

“I will impart a knowledge of this art…to pupils who have signed the covenant, and have taken an oath according to the medical law, but no one else.”

In the 70’s we started to see the very first shift away from closed records and medical knowledge when patients were allowed to access their paper records.  In the 80’s and 90’s we started to see the first patient portals.

Dr. Lin described the old healthcare mentality as follows:

  • Knowledge is power.  Respect my studies.
  • I am too important for clerical tasks.
  • Patients do best when they do what I say.
  • There is nothing wrong with the way I work.

Then, he suggested where we are headed in healthcare:

  • Collaboration is powerful.
  • Communication improves safety.
  • Connection fosters participation.
  • Change requires a burning platform.

This shift requires us to move from a physician centered healthcare system to a patient centered healthcare system.  Is it any wonder why physicians feel threatened?  However, Dr. Lin has studied how this shift impacts both doctors and patients and the results are profound.

Dr. Lin discussed these results during his presentation at the Healthcare Forum (embedded below):

His presentation focused on studies he conducted on: online messaging, online release of test results, and online release of doctor notes.  In each case, Dr. Lin presents the fears many doctors have of connecting with patients in this manner and also the many doctors who see potential benefits of pulling back the curtain.  Some of those fears include: “This is a crazy idea; the phone will ring off the hook” and “Patients will be more anxious.”  One doctor only agreed to participate in his study because he thought that Dr. Lin was doing a “rigorous study” and he was certain that the study would validate his fears.

The results from his research consistently showed that the “floodgates” of patient requests didn’t open and where studied there was a dramatic improvement in patient satisfaction.   The irony of people’s reaction to the study was that it varied based on the clinic’s perspective.  For example, a busy clinic that has more patients than it can handle was happy to reduce the number of patient calls while a slower clinic was not happy with that result.  An even more surprising result was doctors who found they were better doctors after the change.

Plus, there were plenty of anecdotal examples of patient benefit that were not captured in the qualitative portion of the study.  For example, one patient who had been given access to their physician’s notes reported this experience: “I lost my luggage while traveling.  I went to a local doc and said: ‘If you have Internet Explorer, I can show you my chart.  Could I have a few days of my meds?”  Access to the physician notes changed the entire experience.

Dr. Lin’s research has also been confirmed by a 250 doctor initiative called OpenNotes which came to similar conclusions.  When you involve the patient, the world does not come to an end.  Patients are happier, more satisfied, more connected, and more empowered.  Dr. Lin concluded, “Patient centered information technology is fast moving, often out of focus, but always exciting.”

The Breakaway Group, A Xerox Company, sponsored this coverage of the Healthcare Forum in order to share the messages from the forum with a wider audience.  You can view all of the Healthcare Forum videos on The Healthcare Forum website.

Missed Patient Portal Changes to MU Stage 1

Posted on July 8, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s fun to have this post on Monday since we did a few years of Meaningful Use Monday posts. This actually comes from a regular reader of EMR and HIPAA who works at an EHR vendor. He wanted to point out a change to meaningful use stage 1 that they’d missed. I expect there are likely others that might have missed this change as well.

Practices attesting stage 1 in 2014 for their year one or two must have the Patient Portal. ONC made a change and made the menu item Core for this in Stage 1. We thought it was stage 2 only. I reached out to a dozen or so REC consultants we work with and more than half of them had missed this point also.

CMS replaced the Stage 1 objectives for providing electronic copies of (CORE) and electronic access to health information (MENU) with the objective to provide patients the ability to view, download, or transmit their health information.

This means that any provider attesting to Stage 1 MU in 2014 (either Year 1 or Year 2) must attest to the objective: “Provide patients ability to view download and transmit their health information.” This will be a CORE measure and will require the portal.

More information is available on page 3 of this
http://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/Downloads/Stage1ChangesTipsheet.pdf

Looks like we’re going to have more patient portals in place really soon. Is your organization ready with a patient portal to meet this meaningful use measure?

2013 Health IT Predictions – 3-D Printing in Healthcare

Posted on January 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I never can resist clicking on a tweet that looks at the future landscape of healthcare IT. I love to see what other people are saying about it. Although, as is the case above, I usually find that people are pretty cautious in their predictions. The challenge is that a year is probably not a big enough time frame to really make bold predictions.

For example, the above article suggests the following as major healthcare IT trends: patient portals, mobile devices, and telemedicine. They are absolutely right. Does anyone doubt that all of these things won’t be major happenings in 2013? We know they will because they’ve already started happening today. Next year will just be an extension of this year.

On the other hand, I was intrigued by this tweet about 3-D Printing in healthcare:

If you don’t know about 3-D printing, then check it out on Wikipedia. It is an absolutely incredible technology that’s going to absolutely revolutionize manufacturing products as we know it. That includes many of the products we use in healthcare. Is it going to happen next year? I don’t think so. Certainly much progress will be made in 2013, but 5 years from now 3D printing is going to be able to do insane things when it comes to creating your own products with a simple 3D printer.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. What drastic things do you think will happen in healthcare 5 years from now? Feel free to look even farther out if you prefer.