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How Nursing Informatics is Changing the Healthcare Landscape – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 26, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/29 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Cathy Turner (@MEDITECH_Nurses) and Ashley Dauwer (@amariedauwer) from @MEDITECH on the topic of “How Nursing Informatics is Changing the Healthcare Landscape.”

When it comes to treating patients, there is one constant: the critical role that nurses play in delivering quality care. As care becomes more complex and stretches far beyond the acute hospital walls, nursing roles will continue to evolve. The nursing informaticist role emerged at the unique junction between healthcare and technology. Nursing informaticists are essential because they serve as an advocate between nurses directly caring for patients and information technology experts, helping to implement and optimize information technology to transform healthcare.

Two weeks ago hundreds of nurses convened at MEDITECH’s annual Nurse Forum. Year after year I am impressed with how our community of nurses come together to discuss how new technologies can address challenges and obstacles facing nurses today. It’s important for nurses to leverage events and social media to network, share successes, and demonstrate how they are embracing technology to impact patient care.

Resources:

Join us for a lively discussion at this week’s #HITsm chat as we explore these themes and discuss the following questions:

T1: What is nursing informatics and what does it mean to you? #HITsm

T2: How are nursing informaticists influencing changes in healthcare? #HITsm

T3: What technologies are improving patient care and nursing workflows? #HITsm

T4: What tips or advice do you have for new nursing informaticists? #HITsm

T5: How can social media help nurses in their healthcare career? #HITsm

Bonus: For the nurses, who is your biggest inspiration and why? For the non-nurses, name a nurse that inspires you and why. #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
7/6 – What’s the Future of Patient Communication?
Hosted by Lea Chatham (@LeaChatham)

7/13 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

7/20 – TBD
Hosted by Jared Jeffery (@Jk_Jeffery)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Doctors at the Nurses Station – Fun Friday

Posted on June 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Time for a little Fun Friday as we head into the weekend. This week’s Fun Friday is a video from ZDoggMD as his alter ego, Doc Vader. In this video Doc Vader spends time at the nurses station. There’s some funny truth to the idea of doctors trying to do the work that nurses do. Always important to remember how important every person in a healthcare organization is to the success of the healthcare organization. Enjoy the video and the weekend!

Are EMR Vendors Really This Clueless?

Posted on August 24, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I know that EMR vendors don’t always understand their end-users as well as they should. That’s a shame, but it’s likely to happen given how far apart their day-to-day lives are. Still, I was truly taken aback by the following.

In the introduction to a report on nurse perceptions of EHRs, researchers shared some words on their market research philosophy. I don’t think the writers intended to criticize anyone, but nonetheless, the vendors don’t come out looking very good in the process.

“Some (mainly vendors) have questioned why we conduct research to front-line users of core HIT systems, such as physicians, nurses, billers, schedulers etc.,” they wrote. “They argue that only the high-ranking decision-makers matter when it comes to tracking customer satisfaction (NPS) and winning a greater piece of the market. We’ve had senior leaders among prominent vendors essentially tell us that they don’t care about what frontline users have to say.”

Okay. (Taking a breath, letting out the bad air, taking in the good.) I don’t wanna go off on a rant here, but are those vendors completely stupid?  Are they trying to destroy whatever credibility they have left among end users?  Are they hinting that we should just sell their companies’ stocks short and live in the Bahamas the rest of our days?

To be clear, the researchers actually put a reasonably cheerful spin on all of this. They suggest, ever so politely, that if vendors pay attention to end users, they will “unlock a competitive gold mine.”  “Yes, it would require additional development resources, adjusting some roadmap goals, and resetting internal expectations, but the payoff is a quantifiable Unique Selling Proposition that just doesn’t exist very often in HIT – having a highly-rated platform among users,” they note, quite reasonably.

Being me, however, I’ll be a bit less nice. Vendors, I’m amazed we still have a health IT industry if that’s really how your leaders really think. It takes a uniquely dumb organization to keep selling products the actual users hate, and an even dumber one to ignore user feedback that could fix the problem.

While healthcare organizations may have rammed a jerry-rigged mess down users’ throats for a while, that can’t last forever — in fact, the day of reckoning is coming soon. As EMR users become more confident, wired and demanding, they’ll demand that their systems actually work for them. Imagine that!

This reckoning won’t just impact your future plans, it will come to bite you now.

If you were hoping to turn your multi-year contract into a nice, fat revenue stream, forget it. Users will scream (and inflict some pain) if the EMR is lousy to use. In a population health-based world calling for everyone to be clinical data power users, they’ll have far more clout. You’ll either spend tons of time fixing and updating things or lose your contract if your customer has an out. Either way, you’ve hollowed out your revenue stream. Good luck with that.

Healthcare Communication Cartoon – Fun Friday

Posted on July 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Happy Friday Everyone! This feels like a short week because of the holiday. Time for some fun Friday. I really like this first one because it has so many layers of humor. IT people like myself will see the humor from the tech angle, but nurses will see the humor from the overworked nurse angle. Tech will hopefully help with situations like this.

And the importance of communication in healthcare. Another area where tech should help, but in many cases it’s hindering us.

Nursing and Healthcare Reform Cartoons – Fun Friday

Posted on June 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s time again for some Fun Friday cartoons. This week’s comics are more general healthcare cartoons, but they were both too funny to not share. I hope you enjoy them.

If you don’t love nurses, then we can’t be friends. They are some of the most amazing people in the world and undervalued and underappreciated in healthcare.

This one might be a little too close to home for many in the current healthcare reform environment. Humor that borders on reality are my favorite.

Vocera Aims For More Intelligent Hospital Interventions

Posted on November 14, 2016 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Everyday scenes that Vocera Communications would like to eliminate from hospitals:

  • A nurse responds to an urgent change in the patient’s condition. While the nurse is caring for the patient, monitors continue to go off with alerts about the situation, distracting her and increasing the stress for both herself and the patient.

  • A monitor beeps in response to a dangerous change in a patient’s condition. A nurse pages the physician in charge. The physician calls back to the nurse’s station, but the nurse is off on another task. They play telephone tag while patient needs go unmet around the floor.

  • A nurse is engaged in a delicate operation when her mobile device goes off, distracting her at a crucial moment. Neither the patient she is currently working with nor the one whose condition triggered the alert gets the attention he needs.

  • A nurse describes a change in a patient’s condition to a physician, who promises to order a new medication. The nurse then checks the medical record every few minutes in the hope of seeing when the order went through. (This is similar to a common computing problem called “polling”, where a software or hardware component wakes up regularly just to see whether data has come in for it to handle.)

Wasteful, nerve-racking situations such as these have caught the attention of Vocera over the past several years as it has rolled out communications devices and services for hospital staff, and have just been driven forward by its purchase of the software firm Extension Healthcare.

Vocera Communications’ and Extension Healthcare’s solutions blend to take pressures off clinicians in hospitals and improve their responses to patient needs. According to Brent Lang, President and CEO of Vocera Communications, the two companies partnered together on 40 customers before the acquisition. They take data from multiple sources–such as patient monitors and electronic health records–to make intelligent decisions about “when to send alarms, whom to send them to, and what information to include” so the responding nurse or doctor has the information needed to make a quick and effective intervention.

Hospitals are gradually adopting technological solutions that other parts of society got used to long ago. People are gradually moving away from setting their lights and thermostats by hand to Internet-of-Things systems that can adjust the lights and thermostats according to who is in the house. The combination of Vocera and Extension Healthcare should be able to do the same for patient care.

One simple example concerns the first scenario with which I started this article. Vocera can integrate with the hospital’s location monitoring (through devices worn by health personnel) that the system can consult to see whether the nurse is in the same room as the patient for whom the alert is generated. The system can then stop forwarding alarms about that patient to the nurse.

The nurse can also inform the system when she is busy, and alerts from other patients can be sent to a back-up nurse.

Extension Healthcare can deliver messages to a range of devices, but the Vocera badge and smartphone app work particularly well with it because they can deliver contextual information instead of just an alert. Hospitals can define protocols stating that when certain types of devices deliver certain types of alerts, they should be accompanied by particular types of data (such as relevant vital signs). Extension Healthcare can gather and deliver the data, which the Vocera badge or smartphone app can then display.

Lang hopes the integrated systems can help the professionals prioritize their interventions. Nurses are interrupt-driven, and it’s hard for them to keep the most important tasks in mind–a situation that leads to burn-out. The solutions Vocera is putting together may significantly change workflows and improve care.

Dear Nurses – Fun Friday

Posted on June 17, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This week my cousin sent me a message late at night on Facebook. She’s a nurse and had just experienced her first patient who coded on her. Needless to say it was a traumatic experience and she was reeling from the experience. I’m not sure how much I helped her, but I tried to show some empathy and at least be there to listen to her in her time of need.

This experience reminded me of what a challenging job it is to be a nurse. We certainly don’t show them enough appreciation. With this in mind, it seemed fitting for this Fun Friday post to share ZDoggMD’s “Dear Nurses” parody of Tupac Shakur’s “Dear Mama.”

A big thank you to all the nurses out there that make healthcare great and don’t get nearly the recognition they deserve.

Is Mobile Health Missing Nurses?

Posted on October 4, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the most under appreciated groups in healthcare is the nurse. I’m sure that every nurse agrees with me. I think that it’s gotten better in many ways for nurses, but from my experience nurses are often taken for granted. I’m probably to blame as much as the next person.

When I think about all the things I’ve written across the Healthcare Scene network of blogs, it’s pretty rare that I ever do a post that’s focused on the nurses. I can think of hundreds and possibly thousands of times I’ve written about the impact on physicians and patients. Nurses. Not so much. Occasionally they’ll get a tangential mention, but rarely are they the center of any healthcare IT story.

As I think about the mobile health space, I think the same is often true. There are thousands of mobile apps focused on doctors. There are thousands of mobile apps focused on patients. How many are focused on nurses? I can’t remember writing about very many nurse focused mobile health apps.

I think I was reminded of this when I saw @MatthewBrowning in my Twitter stream today. As an RN, he built a product called YourNurseIsOn.com which it seems has now been renamed to IntelliBlast Communication System. It was great to see a nurse providing an IT solution for nurses. I haven’t talked to Matthew for a long time, but I remember him talking about how hard it was for him to sale into hospitals. Despite the fact that it’s hard to sale anything to hospitals, I wonder if the fact that he was selling a nurse focused product made it even harder. Maybe that’s why they changed the name? I don’t know, but what I do know is that it’s been pretty rare that I’ve seen an organization focused on products for nurses.

I think most people realize the vital role that nurses play in healthcare. However, there seems to be a mismatch in the role nurses play in healthcare and the mobile and other healthcare IT tools that are built for them. I wonder what mobile health tools would be created for nurses if they were the focus and not just an afterthought.

11 Great iPhone Apps for Nurses — According to Apple

Posted on May 13, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

It seems like every day, I read another article about nurses using tablets and smartphones in the workplace. I was just thinking the other day that I should do a round-up of great apps for nurses, but it looks like Apple beat me to it. This list was compiled by Apple last year, and they are their top 11 iPhone apps for nurses. While I still plan to make a list of apps for both the iPhone and Android devices that nurses can use, I thought I’d share these apps as well.

Most of these apps are free (though they may involve a paid subscription), though some cost less than $10. After reading about them, I can definitely see how they could be helpful. So, nursing friends, if you have an iPhone or an iPad that you use at work — these might be something you want to look into. Here’s a brief description, and cost, of each app that made Apple’s top apps for nurses list:

1.  Voalte OneBefore you get too attached to this one, your hospital must be equipped with the Voalté Server. And if it is, then great! Because this app allows for phone calls through a hospital’s VoIP system, secure text messaging using a user directory, and alarm management. Medical professionals are able to receive alarms, and respond quickly, which helps with overall workflow.

Cost: Free 

2Nursing CentralThis is a comprehensive database designed to help nurses find answers to just about any question they might have.There is detail information on diseases, tests, drugs, and more, and a medical dictionary with more than 60,000 entries.

Cost: Free

3. NurseTabs: FundamentalsThere are a couple of NurseTabs apps, which are specifically designed for new nurses. This one covers the basic skills and procedures nurses need to know. After selecting a specific procedure, the nurse will be given step-by-step information, including what kind of equipment should be used.

Cost: 9.99

4. PatientTouchThis app was created to help improve workflow, and help nurses spend more time with their patients.  It assists in specimen collection, infant care, communications, and more. PatientTouch is completely HIPAA compliant, and hopefully will help increase quality of care, while decrease costs. 

Cost: Free

5. MedigramMedigram is a simple way to securely send messages containing medical information. This makes it possible to collaborate with other medical professionals in a secure and quick manner.

Cost: Free

6. NurseTabs: MedsurgeAnother app by NurseTabs that was created specifically for new nurses, or nursing students. It contains over 300 diseases and disorders, organized in an easily searchable way. After selecting a certain ailment, the user can access tons of information about it, including a nursing process approach on how to handle the situation. It’s also a great place to review for the NCLEX exam.

Cost: 9.99

7. Lab Values ReferenceIf you are working with lab results a lot, this could be very helpful. I actually might download this myself (access to my lab results immediately makes me constantly look things up until I hear from my doctor.) It has coverage of the 375 most commonly performed lab results, which includes the normal ranges or findings, results, explanations of abnormalities, and more.

Cost: .99

8. NCSBN Learning Extension Medication FlashcardsStressing out about the NCLEX? No need to worry anymore. This app is a great resource for memorizing drug information, as you can sort cards into different categories, learn interesting facts, and more.

Cost: Free

9. The Merck Manuals for Mobile + WebMerck Manuals are one of the most widely used and accepted medical reference guides. And now, you can have it at your fingertips. The app is free, but you have to pay for the subscription. There are three different manuals that can be downloaded — the 19th edition for mobile and web, patient symptoms guide, and Davis’ drug guide.

Cost: Free

10. Shots by STFM: Does anyone like getting shots? I sure don’t think so. And I imagine nurses don’t get any joy out of administering them. This app helps making the process a little easier when trying to determine the correct dosages, especially for unique situations. It contains the CDC recommended course for vaccines, information on ingredients, side effects, and more.

Cost: Free

11. Lexicomp: Lexicomp is a great resource with trusted information about drug and clinical information. There are quite a few databases available with information, pictures, videos, and more. These can be accessed with or without a data/WiFi connection.

Cost: Free to download, but you will need a subscription to Lexicomp as well

National Nurses Day Tribute

Posted on May 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today is National Nurses Day and this week is a celebration of all the amazing nurses in healthcare. I think nurses are the unsung heroes of healthcare. They do an extraordinary job and get very little recognition.

When I think about EMR in general it impacts nurses as much or more than anyone in the clinic. Yet in most cases, nurses have very little involvement in the EMR purchase process. Sure, most places do some sort of meeting with the nurses and they take a little feedback from them, but from my experience they have little involvement in which EMR is chosen.

This means that most nurses just have to deal with whatever EMR their clinic or hospital chooses. Most of them do it with the grace of a nurse.

My favorite nurse story comes from my experience with this wonderful nurse I worked with named Shelley. She is a vivacious and passionate nurse that loved her job. She wasn’t afraid to tell you what she really thought and had a heart as big as I’ve ever seen. Plus, she gave the best bear hugs!

When it came to the idea of going to EMR, Shelley was one of the biggest critics. She was not looking forward to the change and was vocal about it. Despite her and others fear of EMR, we pressed forward. One of the very first days after we implemented the EMR I came into the nurses station where I saw one of the nurses struggling with some EMR function. Next thing I know, EMR averse Shelley is reaching over the nurse’s shoulder and teaching her how to fix her EMR problem. It became a kind of running joke in the clinic that Shelley could go from EMR critic to EMR trainer.

I think this highlights the beauty of so many nurses. First, the ability to adapt to challenging situations. Second, the concern and care for fellow nurses and patients. Shelley was such a great representative of nursing to me.

On this National Nurses Day, I want to honor my friend Shelley and all the other caring, professional, wonderful nurses out there. This video from RWJF highlights the greatness of nurses.