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AliveCor Interview – Raises $30 Million

Posted on March 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When I look across the mobile health ecosystem, one of the big winners is AliveCor. They’ve done an incredible job with their company and bringing their ECG readings to a much wider audience. The news recently came out that they’d raised their Series D round of investment of $30 million. As part of that announcement, my colleague Neil Versel from Meaningful Health IT News did an interview with the COO from AliveCor, Doug Biehn. You can check out the full interview below:

I hadn’t caught up with AliveCor for a while, so it was interesting to hear how much progress the company has made. Neil does a good job covering how AliveCor has been trying to figure out the balance between a consumer solution and a provider (FDA cleared) solution.

One of my favorite comments from the video above is when Neil asks about their new AlieCor platform and Doug Biehn says, “We’ve been launching new apps in the consumer space every 6 weeks for the past year, but this is our first big entree into the medical professional market.” I love this sort of iterative development in healthcare. While AliveCor does ECG, I think they’re just getting started. I’ll be interested to see what else comes out of this company as it continues to iterate and mature.

The ONC Health IT Complaint Form That Has No Teeth

Posted on September 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Neil Versel over on MedCityNews just reported that the ONC Healthcare IT Complain form that was announced on Friday is not working. If you go and visit the health IT complaint form, it just says “You are not authorized to access this page.”

While it’s quite ironic that the complaint form is down, I’m pretty sure it’s a simple fix. I’ve seen that error before on many websites and I’m guessing the ONC/HHS web people just need to make the form go live and then the page will load properly with the form.

I was discussing the irony of the form being down with Neil Versel on Facebook and I told him that I was more interested in what ONC is going to do with the complaints than whether the form was working or not. If ONC isn’t going to do anything with the complaints they receive, then the form might as well be down. Submitting a healthcare IT complaint to an organization that can do nothing about it might be a little cathartic, but not very much. In fact, over time it just leads to more anger that people have complained and nothing’s been done.

I asked Neil, “Do they [ONC] have any power to do anything?” He answered, “No. The HIT Safety Center they are working on is basically toothless.”

That’s been my impression as well. ONC would love to do something about it, but they don’t have many levers they can pull. The worst they could do is terminate an EHR’s certification, but they’ve been doing that already.

Neil and I did discuss that maybe all of the data they receive from their healthcare IT complaint form could be used to make a case for why they need more options available for them to punish bad actors in healthcare IT. As it is it seems the only thing they can offer healthcare IT complainers is some empathy. Of course, they can’t do that until they get their form working. Where’s the form I can fill out to let ONC know that their complaint form isn’t working?

Great Interview with Jonathan Bush

Posted on May 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Jonathan Bush is the very best interview in healthcare IT. A few years back, Neil Versel grabbed Jonathan Bush at his athenahealth cloud party at HIMSS for an interview. It’s now become quite a tradition. They talk a lot about CommonWell, the impact of Medicare penalties, and much more. Here’s this year’s interview of Jonathan Bush at HIMSS by Neil Versel:

P.S. Yes, HIMSS was forever ago and I’m just catching up on stuff now.

4 Health IT and EHR Blogs

Posted on August 29, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I’ve been regularly trying to feature other Health IT and EHR bloggers out there. A lot of them are creating some really great content and I’m always happy when there are more smart people joining in on the healthcare IT conversation. I hope you enjoy discovering some new blogs that might help you in your work.

Meaningful Health IT News – This is Neil Versel’s healthcare IT blog. Neil is the most prolific healthcare IT journalist out there having written for pretty much every healthcare IT publication over the past couple decades. I’ve mentioned before that Neil’s blog was one of the first ones I looked to when I started writing a blog. I modeled some of the things I do after him. I figured he was a real journalist and I wasn’t, so I should learn from him. I should disclose that Neil’s blog is part of the Healthcare Scene network of blogs. I’m lucky to be able to work with someone like Neil. I only wish he had more time to write on his blog.

Data 4 U – This is a new health IT blog by Lynn Zahner, a former obstetrician/gynecologist, who’s transforming into a health IT professional. Looking at even just the first 3 posts I’m excited to see what Lynn will bring next. It’s always great to have a clinician’s perspective on healthcare IT. I hope Lynn’s able to keep it up.

Kat’s Space – Kat’s blog is a new find for me. She’s a RN and digital marketing interested in tech and social media. It’s too bad I hadn’t found her before now. Sounds like we’d get along really well. She’s also a Google Glass explorer and so she provides some really interesting insights into the Glass and wearable technology space.

Accountable Health – I think we can all use a great accountable health blog. In fact, we can likely use more than one to try and figure out what’s happening with ACOs and other accountable care programs that are in the works. This blog is written by Fred Goldstein. Fred has a unique view of the accountable care world since he’s the Founder of the Population Health Alliance. I think Fred’s blog is one to watch if you care about where healthcare reimbursement is headed.

Health IT Tweet Roundup – Neil Versel Edition

Posted on July 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As you know, each weekend I like to do a roundup of interesting tweets and add a bit of commentary. This time I thought it would be fun to grab some tweets from just one person, Neil Versel. Neil has been doing a number of really great posts on his blog Meaningful Health IT News lately (Full Disclosure: Neil’s blog is part of the Healthcare Scene blog network). The following tweets highlight some of Neil’s recent blog posts.


I agree that Blue Button Plus is a great step forward for Blue Button. This post is particularly interesting because Neil didn’t see the promise of Blue Button before the changes were made and it was called plus.


This is a great discussion on the meaningful use requirements and Blue Button’s role in them. Join in if you have some knowledge on the area about what your EHR is doing.


Neil’s right about people who don’t cover healthcare regularly not understanding many of the true dynamics at play. I do find it interesting that Neil is such a fan of clinical decision support. I still think it’s in such an infant state. I can’t wait for much more advanced clinical decision support.

Texting Program Helps Patients Give Hospital More Immediate Feedback

Posted on May 31, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Recently, Neil Versel wrote about a truly horrible hospital experience his father had before his passing over on Meaningful Health IT News. It got me thinking, how many patients have terrible experiences like this, and, does the hospitals’ staff even realize it? Most hospitals give their patient’s a form to fill out toward the end of their stay to evaluate their care. A situation I was in a few months ago makes me wonder, however, how accurate those are in determining the care the patient actually received.

When my son was in the hospital during his second week of life with RSV, I was very disappointed with the care he received overall. Yes, there were a few good nurses, but for the most part, my husband and I felt several times like having our son there was an inconvenience to the hospital. One time, when I left for a few hours and my sister stayed with my son, a nurse tried to discharge us (despite the fact that my son was still on oxygen, and was being suctioned every few hours) without even consulting us. At one point, we were told they wanted more room for “more sick” patients, so they might send us home, even though our baby was still very ill. I voiced my concerns a few times but they were dismissed and I was basically told I didn’t have much of an opinion in my son’s care. However, when the time came to fill out the “confidential evaluation form” I was hovered over by the nurse as I filled it out and was given very little time to actually fill it out. What the nurse came away with was a form that would have probably insinuated that our stay was fine, seeing as I hastily finished it without much thought. I planned to complain later, but time got away from me, as it usually does with a newborn baby. I knew I wasn’t the only one to have a poor experience in the pediatrics/mother and child floor at the hospital, as everyone I spoke to who had delivered here said they had a terrible experience. However, the walls are full of notes from mothers staying how wonderful the hospital is. If nurses are hovering over patients as they fill out comment cards or are “encouraged” to fill out a thank you note, how accurate are the results? And even if the patient isn’t watched while filling it out, a piece of paper is very easy to misplace or be forgotten about.

So when I read this article about a texting program implemented at Park Nicollet Health Service in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, I was intrigued. The program, which is called CareWire, sends text messages to patients before and after their stay, sends appointment reminders, and asks questions about the patient’s stay in the hospital. The program was implemented to increase patient satisfaction. According to this article at MedCity, the part of the texting program that proves to be most useful is a “post-discharge” text that patients receive within a few hours after the patient leaves the hospital. The patient is asked to rate their experience on a 0 to 10 scale, and then Carewire “uses an algorithm to parse of the reason for any low scores, such as the type and time of the visit, which doctor the patient saw, and other relevant data. Customer Service reps then can follow up immediately on any low scores.”

Apparently, the hospital said that the program has helped to raise the satisfaction of patients and is being offered to other facilities in the area.

I love the idea of having a texting program like this. There is no risk of being rushed to fill out a form, or being eyed by an intimidating nurse as you teeter between putting a low score on one of the questions. Many hospitals have a company call patients a few weeks after their stay to answer questions, but this texting program allows for immediate, and more than likely, honest feedback. The fact that CareWire can determine facts such as the time of visit, which doctors (and hopefully, nurses) gave care, etc. during the patient’s stay make this program even better, as it can pinpoint where specific problems may be.

While it would seem that people should be able to voice their concerns and receive immediate reconciliation of the problem, it isn’t always that easy. Sometimes it can be intimidating, especially when in the hospital, which is likely not the most uplifting situation to be in. At least, that is how I feel.

The article I first linked to talks about how other hospitals are implementing other ways to get immediate feedback, such as administering a survey through a tablet right before the patient leaves. While this is somewhat similar to filling out a piece of a paper, I feel like more people would actually fill it out because, unlike a piece of paper that can be thrown away or misplaced and never filled out, there isn’t really a  risk of that happening. The information would then be uploaded immediately to a computer, and hopefully one of the hospital’s employees could review it and help to reconcile any potential problems.

Having this immediate feedback is essential, in my opinion, for increasing patient satisfaction and helping to identify problem areas. This may increase some costs at the hospital, as Healthy Heartland, the vendor for MedCity, said it would potentially add $3 or $4 per visit to use the texting program. However, if patient’s are able to receive better care in the long run, I feel like this cost is well-worth the cost. I mean, if someone’s experience at a hospital is mediocre at best, they may not feel the need to complain or fill out a satisfaction form. However, if their response to a text indicated they could have received better care at a certain time, it might eliminate certain problems before they spiral out of control, and the horrible experience that Neil Versel’s father had could be prevented. Just something to think about.

What do you think? Do you think that this type of immediate feedback would increase patient satisfaction and, hopefully, the quality of care given at hospitals? Would you take the time to respond to a text?

Meet the Bloggers Panel Video and Dell Healthcare Think Tank at HIMSS12

Posted on March 9, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Meet the Bloggers Panel at HIMSS12
As many of you know, I was on a Meet the Bloggers panel at HIMSS 2012. I didn’t realize it at the time, but Charles Webster, MD (@EHRworkflow) was sitting on the front row filming us the whole time from a video camera he had attached to his hat #hatcam. I think some good information was shared for those interested in using blogging and/or social media in healthcare.

The moderator of the panel was Brian Ahier and the panelist were Healthcare Scene contributor Jennifer Dennard, Neil Versel from Meaningful Health IT News and Carissa Caramanis O’Brien of Aetna.

Neil was gracious enough to do all the work of embedding each video clips into a Meet the Bloggers at HIMSS post. So, instead, of embedding them all here, head over to his site to enjoy them. I will just embed one video of me talking about healthcare social media below:

One thing became abundantly clear at HIMSS. I love social media and know a little something about it. One of my favorite meetings was with a health IT vendor who wanted to tell me about them and talk about blogging/social media. They started asking questions about blogging/social media first and an hour later we were out of time. That interaction made me wonder if I should put together some one or two day social media training/strategy sessions for vendors. I think one key to social media is authenticity which means I think it’s hard to outsource it.

Dell Healthcare Think Tank
I didn’t participate in the Dell Healthcare Think Tank that happened at HIMSS, but two writers for Healthcare Scene did: Jennifer Dennard and Neil Versel. They posted the whole video for the event and I’ll embed it below. I was able to watch a good portion of it and found a number of the comments quite interesting. I find it really intriguing that Dell would hold an event like this. In many ways, this is how I get the knowledge and insight that I post on this blog. I spend time with many of the people that attended the think tank and we talk about the healthcare IT world.

eCollaboration at HIMSS12, MU Stage 2, Healthcare Social Media, Tablets and Accessible Patient Data

Posted on February 5, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m sure many of you are recovering from the Super Bowl right now. I got exactly what I wanted from the Super Bowl: a great game. I didn’t care too much either way, but I am glad that I predicted the Giants to be the winners. Too bad I’m not a betting man. Although, I guess that’s the trick with betting….but I digress.

Time for my regular weekend round up of interesting things happening in the healthcare IT and EMR twittersphere. We’ve got some really interesting tweets this week. Here we go.


When I created and posted my list of HIMSS 12 sessions, they hadn’t created the agenda for the eCollaboration Forum at HIMSS and so I couldn’t add any sessions. However, the eCollaboration Forum at HIMSS 12 agenda is up now, so check it out. I know there are a number of sessions I’m going to add from the forum. I also love that they have the online option linked in this tweet for those not attending HIMSS 2012.


This is really important news. I think a lot of us are REALLY interested to see the final meaningful use stage 2 details. Good find by Neil Versel.


I’m sure we’re going to continue seeing the trend of more and more doctors gleaning value from engaging in social media. At a minimum doctors are going to start finding more and more new patients using social media including things like physician blogging. A well done practice website and social media effort is going to be really valuable for the doctor of the future.


Yes, blogging will also help hospitals in a number of ways too. Social media can benefit hospitals, doctors, practices, etc.


I was fascinated by this tweet. First because I wonder what changes will make tablets more than just great for content consumption. Second, the idea of PCs being more intellectually flexible.


I know there are reasons why financial data is more portable and accessible than healthcare data, but it still irks me that we haven’t overcome those reasons…yet!

Examples of Health Startup Opportunity

Posted on December 21, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Anyone that is part of the healthcare IT and EMR world has to realize that we’re in a really incredible time for healthcare IT and EMR. There’s has never been more energy, excitement and actual investment in the Healthcare IT world than there is now. If you don’t believe me, buy your ticket to Las Vegas and attend HIMSS 2012 and I’m sure you’ll see what I mean. I have a feeling that HIMSS Las Vegas is going to be bigger than ever with more money flowing as well.

Just to provide a few examples of what’s happening, the prominent IT investor Esther Dyson has invested in 20 Health IT investments. That’s a whole lot of investment in healthcare IT. She obviously sees some real opportunities available at this time in health IT.

Another recent announcement was the recent batch of 15 Rock Health Startup companies. This is just one of at least 3 or 4 health focused incubators out there. Plus, the latest batch of health IT startup companies from Rock Health even has Neil Versel singing their praises after a previous not so glowing review of the health startup incubator (or health accelerator if you prefer).

One other thing that is easy to underestimate is the value that the US government is putting on supporting healthcare innovation through entrepreneurship. Normally I’m as skeptical as anyone in putting any sort of faith in government to produce results. I still think they have their hands tied in a lot of things, but I give a lot of credit to Aneesh Chopra, Todd Park and Farzad Mostashari for doing their very best to kick against the challenges of big government while enabling health entrepreneurs to be successful.

Priya Ramachandran wrote about an example of one initiative the government is putting forward to help entrepreneurs: Access to Public Health Data. Every time I hear someone talk about the data that’s available from these public repositories of health data, the entrepreneur inside of me kicks in with ideas on how to use that data for good.

It is a really tremendous time to be an entrepreneur in healthcare. I do think we still need a better platform for health IT startups to launch their products and get funding. I have a few ideas I’m working on in this regard. More on this in the future.

Thoughts on Top #HITsm Contributor Awards

Posted on December 20, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


Today my inbox was flooded with people congratulating @techguy and @ehrandhit for being part of the Top #HITsm Contributors of 2011. It’s very kind of them to recognize both of my active Health IT Twitter accounts. Officially @techguy was in the Top Individual #HITsm Contributors and @ehrandhit was in the Top #HITsm Organizations. I think @ehrandhit could have gone in organizations or publications, but either way I appreciate the recognition.

I think the comment at the top of the list describes the awards quite well:

By no means is the following lists all-inclusive. It does, however, represent some fantastic #HITsm voices on Twitter who regularly participate in weekly #HITsm TweetChats and share valuable Health IT information.

I always have a bit of a challenge with “Awards.” However, I think that #HITsm made a really great choice when they decided that instead of saying that this list is the “Best” or some other sort of magnanimous statement about the authority of their list, they instead said that these are some quality and valuable voices in #HITsm. No doubt there are a lot of others out there.

For example, I’d have loved to see @nversel and @john_chilmark on the list as well. They don’t use the tag #HITsm that often, but they definitely discuss those topics often on their various social media outlets. There are quite a few others that I could include in this category as well.

One thing I loved about the Top #HITsm Contributor list was how many familiar faces made it on the list. The great part is that there are so many smart minds on the list and social media makes them completely open and available to you. Without social media I’d likely know very few of those people and would have missed out on the tremendous interactions I’ve had with them at many a conference.

Maybe next year I should work with HL7 Standards and make the announcement of the awards part of the New Media Meetup at HIMSS. Might be kind of cool to get to meet all the great people in person. Yes, social media isn’t just about online connections, but taking those connections offline as well. As I often say:

Social Media (and Twitter in particular) is about connecting people!

In true social media fashion, the list of winners is also available as an embed, so you’ll find the list of Top #HITsm Contributor Awards embedded below as well. Here’s to another great year of Social Media in Healthcare.