Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Healthcare Dashboards, Data, and FHIR

Posted on March 30, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in a dashboard society. We love our dashboards! We have mechanisms to track, analyze, and display all sorts of data at our fingertips any time of the day or night and everywhere we turn. We like it that way! Data is knowledge. Data is power. Data drives decisions. Data is king.

But what about healthcare data? Specifically, what about YOUR healthcare data? Is it all available in one place where you can easily access it, analyze it, and make decisions about your health? Chances are, it’s not. Most likely, it’s locked up inside various EHRs and many tethered (read: connected to the provider, not shareable to other providers) patient portals you received access to when you visited your doctors for various appointments. In some cases, the information that is there might not be correct. In other cases, there might not be much data there at all.

How are you supposed to act as an informed patient or caregiver when you don’t have your data or accurate data for those you are caring for? When health information is spread across multiple portals and the onus is on you to remember every login and password and what data is where for each of these portals, are you really using them effectively? Do you want to use them? It’s not very easy to connect the dots when the dots can’t be located because they’re in different places in varying degrees of completeness.

How do we fix this? What steps need to be taken? Aggregating our health information isn’t just collecting the raw data and calling it a complete record. It’s more than being able to send files back and forth. It’s critical to get your data right, at the core, as part of your platform. That’s what lets you build useful services, like a patient dashboard, or a provider EHR, or a payer analytics capability. A modern data model that represents your health information as a longitudinal patient record is key.

Many IT companies have realized HL7 FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) is the preferred way to get there and are exploring its uses for interoperability. These companies have started using FHIR to map health information from their current data models to FHIR in order to allow information exchange.

This is just the beginning, though. If you want robust records that support models of the future, you need a powerful, coherent data model, like FHIR, as your internal data model, too.  Then take it a step further and use technologies similar to those used by other enterprise scale systems like Netflix and LinkedIn, to give patients and caregivers highly available, scalable, and responsive tools just like their other consumer-facing applications. Solutions that are built on legacy systems can’t scale in this way and offer these benefits.

Our current healthcare IT environment hasn’t made it easy for patients to aggregate their health information or aggregated it for them. If we want to meet the needs of today and tomorrow’s patients and caregivers, we need patient-centric systems designed to make it easy to gather health information from all sources – doctors, hospitals, laboratories, HIEs, and personal health devices and smartphones.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Seven Types of HIMSS18 Attendees: An Exhibitor’s Perspective

Posted on March 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The HIMSSanity is over and everyone’s departed Las Vegas and headed for home (or SXSW). This year, my company was an exhibitor in Hall G at HIMSS. Our booth was on the main aisle, or “the thoroughfare” as those of us in the booth liked to call it. As such, I noticed some trends in the types of booth visits we encountered this year during HIMSS. These visits can be summed up into seven different types.

Integration on the Brain. “I need something to connect my disparate systems together.” Whether it’s EHR-to-EHR, EHR-to-other systems, PHR-to-EHR, or many Health IT combinations, there was no shortage of requests at HIMSS for a system or platform to make these connections happen more seamlessly. Inquiries about integration and connecting various technologies came up more frequently at our booth than any other topic at the show. These conversations were great for MedicaSoft because we can help them solve integration problems.

Partnership Hustle. “I make APIs, products, or provide services to complement your software offering. I think we’d make great partners.” HIMSS is certainly a place to find synergies and begin conversations for potential win-win situations for companies who want to partner together and go to market. Sometimes these meetings are the start of a perfect “meet cute.” Other times, they fall short. Either way, there are lots of folks out there with a wide variety of products and services making their rounds and searching for perfect business partners.

Swag Gatherer. “I came here for the swag.” You know this person. This person has no desire to interact with you. They’re not sure what your company does and many times they don’t care to ask. This person wants to collect as much free stuff at the conference as possible. Sometimes they are annoyed when you don’t have a giveaway. You know you’ve encountered a swag gatherer by their refusal to make eye contact and how fast they exit your booth once they’ve snatched up whatever swag or tchotchke you have to offer.

IT Spy. “I must find out what the competition is doing right now, let me pretend I’m in the market for IT products and booth hop.” We’ve all seen it. We know when it’s happening. It can be hilarious when the spying company tries to act like they are NOT doing this. It’s pretty obvious. I’m on to you. My only request? Be nice about it. We’ll show you what we have. You don’t have to be obnoxious or play dumb. We are happy to share.

Things You Don’t Need. “You really need our product or service even if you think you don’t need our product or service.” Everyone has this happen at one point or another. Someone comes by and really wants to sell you something you don’t need. Sometimes they politely go on their way. Other times they linger on, refusing to acknowledge that you don’t need their product or service. Sometimes being upfront doesn’t help and they continue to launch into their sales pitch anyway. You have to give these folks credit, they really are trying to sell.

Neighborhood Friendly Booth Staff or First-time HIMSS-goer. “I just thought I’d say hello.” This could be neighboring booth staff coming over to say hello. It could also be an exhibitor or attendee who’s there for the first time. In either case, these are friendly people who want to ask questions. They are getting their bearings for the show and trying to learn as much as possible. Many times they ask for advice or directions.

Match Made in Heaven. “We’re looking to buy or replace our patient portal, PHR, EHR, or integration platform.” The crème de la crème of conference attendees. This person has done their research. They know what they want and what they want is what you offer! These types of meetings leave you jazzed for the rest of the conference and eager for post-conference follow-up. This type of conference attendee actually answers your emails and phone calls when you follow-up because they have a genuine interest in what you do and how you can help them solve their IT problems or challenges.

HIMSS18 exhibitors and attendees, what other types of booth attendees did you see this year at the show?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Real Problem with High Healthcare Costs

Posted on February 27, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The rising cost of healthcare in the U.S. is something that nearly everyone experiences on a regular basis. Looking at the trend over the last few decades, there is an eye-opening surge in cost. There’s a great article/table by Kimberly Amadeo that outlines health care costs by year from 1960 to 2015. The cost per person for health care in 1960 was $146. In 2015, the cost per person was $9,990, over 68 times higher than it was in 1960.

The trend shows no sign of slowing; 2018 costs have only gotten higher. The National Conference of State Legislatures cited a figure from a Kaiser Employer Survey stating that annual premiums reached $18,764 in 2017. Costs for people purchasing insurance on an exchange or privately increased even more.

Increasing healthcare costs impact everyone. Why have costs gotten so high? Wasn’t the Affordable Care Act supposed to make coverage more affordable? Instead, many are faced with even higher insurance premiums for themselves and their families. Sometimes that equates to having to make difficult choices in care. And should people have to decide whether or not they can afford to seek care or treatment?

Many people want to blame insurance companies or hospitals or lobbyists or politicians. In truth, it’s a complex issue. And one of the core reasons it’s so hard to dissect is that there is a real lack of data – cost and price information, and clinical information on care quality and outcomes. Nobody has all of the data in one place. Without all of the data, the real problem or problems can’t be seen. If a problem can be guessed, it can’t be fixed. As in the Wizard of Oz, the real drivers are lurking behind the curtain; worse, the data that describes the drivers is splintered and located in different places, waiting to be collected in a way that reveals the whole truth.

How can health IT help? Are there ways that we can help solve the data problem and reduce high healthcare costs? Electronic Health Records can help gather the data. Adding claims data to complete, longitudinal patient health records can also help. Connecting PHRs, EHRs, and claims data together can help bridge the data gaps and tell more of a complete story. Until we have that story, the industry will continue to operate in siloes. Costs will continue to rise. And people will have a harder time seeking out the care they need.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Opportunity for Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) to Untangle Health Records

Posted on February 6, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

As the government’s Meaningful Use incentive program accelerated the adoption of Electronic Health Records, it also increased the use of patient portals and PHRs to meet MU patient engagement measures. You see this today when you’re offered a portal login at your doctor appointments. Other encouraging trends developed around the same time:

  1. Studies proved that engaged patients tend to exhibit more positive health outcomes at lower costs.
  2. Interest increased among patient populations to be involved in their health and wellness, including a desire to see (and even contribute to) their electronic medical records.
  3. Technology innovations flourished to support health (wearables, health devices, applications, etc.).

Despite these trends and the relative success of MU-driven deployments, the patient portal and personal health record landscape leaves much to be desired for their primary users and audience – patients. Many of these tools were created simply to satisfy MU requirements and while they do this, they don’t completely tie together patients’ complex health histories, include data from multiple providers, or travel with the patient from visit to visit. Instead, patients have many different portals – a different one from every different provider. Who wants 10 different portals? Nobody has time for that!

Patients need help assembling a single view of their health records. HIEs are unique in that they work with many different health systems, hospitals, and providers in their regions. HIEs represent an opportunity to be a true integrator of health information between providers and their patients. This can be a regional solution now, and with efforts like the Patient Centered Data Home (PCDH), there is greater opportunity for HIEs to share data across state and regional lines, further expanding their reach and extending real benefits to patients who want their data in one place.

HIEs can leverage their unique position into a meaningful benefit for patient by first creating a single patient record or universal health record (UHR). This UHR or platform works seamlessly with PHRs. By making PHRs available to providers in their exchange, they can then share health data among every provider they link up with and the connections grow from there when you add in PCDH connections in other regions and states. Once there is a platform in place that is truly interoperable, sharing data between providers, patients can start using PHRs that have useful, relevant health data from all of their providers. HIEs can then start building in other capabilities like analytics, population health, care quality metrics, and more.

A patient’s medical journey involves multiple providers and different physical locations as their lives and health evolve. Their health information – in a single, universal health record – should evolve with them. HIEs can play a significant role in making that happen.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/26 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft on the topic of “Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a statistic stating that roughly 117 million people have one or more chronic health conditions. One in four people has two more chronic conditions. That is so many people! It’s 2018 and there are tons of innovative technologies out there. Why aren’t we doing a better job of managing our health conditions?

In a recent blog, I posted that chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record or patient portal to link wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What changes in healthcare technology need to be made to more effectively treat and manage patients with chronic conditions?

Join us to talk about patient portals and chronic disease management during this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Would you (or do you) use technology to help manage your health and wellness? Why or why not? #HITsm

T2: Effectively managing chronic disease can involve changing habits and forming good habits. What are some ways IT can help patients form and maintain good habits? #HITsm

T3: What’s a feature you wish patient portals had that they currently do not? #HITsm

T4: If patient portals collected data so providers could participate in MACRA/MIPS more seamlessly, would you be more apt to encourage their use in your organization? #HITsm

T5: Does your employer provide you a PHR as an employee benefit? If so, does it motivate you to be an engaged patient? #HITsm

Bonus: What are the benefits of having a complete personal health record that you can access anywhere? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
2/2 – From Makerspaces to Virtual Spaces: How 3D Changes Everything…
Hosted by Chuck Webster, MD (@wareFLO)

2/9 – The Role of HealthIT in Driving Payer Provider Employer Collaboration
Hosted by Heather Lavoie (@HSLavoie) from @Geneia

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – #HIMSS18
Hosted by #HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors

3/2 – Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare
Hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management

Posted on January 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

Half of all U.S. adults, roughly 117 million people, have one or more chronic health conditions. 1 in 4 people have two or more chronic conditions. As a nation, we need some help addressing the chronic disease epidemic. Many patient portals today give patients access to pieces of their health information – lab results, for example – and some will flag upcoming appointments or refill a prescription, but where are the tools and the data in a portal to actually help patients manage chronic conditions, thereby improving their overall health and wellness? Sadly, many patient portals provide a very narrow view, with few opportunities to link data to actions to results in a way that closes the loop between patients and caregivers. Without a complete view of a patient’s health measures, wellness goals, and plans of action – and the tools to manage them – it is very difficult to connect health and wellness to address the whole patient.

Chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record to link both wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What does it take to improve and maintain wellness? First, you need patient engagement. You need motivated patients who want to do a good job of actively tracking their conditions and working toward wellness goals. How do you convince a chronically ill patient to do this? Start by offering a tool that’s easy for them to track their data – complete with a workflow and user interface that makes it a breeze to enter and distill information at a glance and when they are on the go. Use technology similar to what patients use in their daily lives on their smart phones and laptops. Give patients tools to understand their health and take action based on how they are doing and what their health goals are! Provide a portal that allows the integration of popular wearable devices and lets the patient decide who should have access (Spouses? Caregivers?) to help them enter and manage their information.

Effectively managing chronic disease requires changing poor habits and forming good habits. Sometimes people need a gentle nudge or a push outside of the exam room. A platform that can send out reminders, gamify the experience, and even call a patient can go a long way in helping steer chronic disease patients in a more positive wellness direction. It’s not all about reminders, either. Texts and calls informing patients when they are doing a good job managing their daily wellness habits can also help.

Beyond helping patients, there’s an added benefit to coupling wellness capabilities with a PHR for providers – it has the ability to not only affect chronic disease factors, but to collect the data providers need to participate in the Quality Payment Program; the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). To quickly review, the Quality Payment Program allows clinicians to be rewarded financially for providing high-quality and high value care through Advanced Alternate Payment Models (APMs) or MIPS that are based on various measures. These measures can be integrated into the PHR, allowing physicians to track their patient populations, run reports, submit information to the Quality Payment Program, and receive merit payments.

What are your thoughts? Would you use a PHR to manage a chronic condition you are experiencing? Would you encourage your loved ones to use one? As a provider, how do you feel about a PHR making it easier for you to track MIPS/MACRA measures?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

PHRs at Work

Posted on December 20, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in an age when our employers can offer a myriad of employee benefits – from pet insurance to wellness incentives. There is no shortage in what employers can offer as a benefit to their employees. Some employers, such as the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), are offering Personal Health Records (PHRs) to their employees as part of a package of health and wellness benefits.

Why offer a PHR to employees? PHRs can help people better gather all of their health information in one place – records from doctors and hospitals, lab results, data from personal devices (like FitBit) and apps, etc. They can help people understand what’s in their health records, manage their own health information, share it with people they trust, and plan for an emergency or for when future health needs arise.

All of this is done in one place that is completely under the employee’s control. Employee-owned PHRs can also allow patients to review their health information for accuracy and share information with trusted healthcare providers. Additionally, employer-hosted, patient-controlled PHRs can help employees or patients aggregate and consolidate the portals and health information they have spanning each doctor’s office, hospital, or health system they’ve visited so that all of their information resides in one place.

A common concern or barrier to employee adoption of PHRs is the fear that employers will look at an employee’s private health information. Fret not. Though it is natural to fear that your employer may look at your information, privacy safeguards are in place to prevent that from happening. PHRs like HealthCenter and USPS Health Connect let you control who sees your information, and provide monitoring to track all access.

What do you think? Would you like a PHR offered to you at work? How would it help you better manage your health or the health of your dependents or loved ones?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or LinkedIn.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

The Power of Combining Clinical & Claims Data

Posted on November 16, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

Whether the goal is to improve outcomes or increase efficiency, the healthcare industry finds itself searching for more and better data to support its efforts. Clinical data provides substantial details on patient encounters, but it is often difficult to assemble and integrate data from more than one healthcare provider. Claims data is better at following a patient across multiple care providers, but lacks information on patient health status and outcomes. Individually, both sets of data tell helpful stories, from chronicling the cost of care to reflecting how medicine is practiced. Together, clinical and claims data provide a fuller picture of a patient’s interactions with health care systems, the costs involved, and the results achieved. This larger picture provides the information that healthcare providers and insurers can use to guide their actions.

Assembling this data and making it available in a useful framework remains challenging. Data is not always available from providers and payers. When data is available, it is often not standardized (a particular issue with clinical data), making analysis difficult. So, how do organizations avoid investing time and money in efforts that fail to produce meaningful results? How do you make the data useful and improve patient satisfaction, care quality, and drive down system costs?

  1. Better data sharing agreements. Both providers and payers need more stringent data sharing agreements in place as well as insistence that they receive good data from plans.
  2. Address data quality issues head-on. Use real experts armed with specific tools to address any data quality issues within an organization.
  3. Use technology to help. Clinical data platforms can aggregate and integrate data into clinically relevant patient records, and claims data platforms extract relevant information from the complexity of the underlying claims data. Further, new advanced platforms help integrate clinical and claims data to support meaningful analytics.

Bringing together clinical data and claims data in a form that supports a variety of tools and analytics is key to the efforts of both healthcare providers and payers to improve outcomes, quality, and cost. This integrated data approach will yield better results than can be achieved with clinical or claims data alone. Stakeholders can and should leverage both policy and technology to develop solutions that produce meaningful results.

Are you combining clinical and claims data in your organization? What value have you gotten out of doing so? Why aren’t you doing it if you’re not?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or LinkedIn.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Why Do We Settle in Healthcare?

Posted on August 22, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Monica Stout, Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. This is the introductory blog in a three-part sponsored blog post series focused on new Health IT for integration. Each month, a different MedicaSoft expert will share insights on new and innovative technology and its applications in healthcare.

Imagine your typical Friday night. You’ve worked hard all week and now you’re ready to watch Netflix. You’ve picked the perfect movie. You’re ready to watch. You hit a button and your movie is right there, available and on demand. But what if it didn’t work? You’d be annoyed. You’d hop on social media to complain or see if Netflix is down. Someone somewhere would hear you.

On Black Friday or Cyber Monday, you might visit Walmart.com to search for some holiday deals. These are the busiest shopping days of the year. What if the website didn’t work? Or, what if you had to enter your shipping and billing data every single time you viewed an item? You’d be outraged. You might hop on social media to complain or see if others are experiencing the same problem. Someone somewhere would hear you.

Now imagine it’s the middle of winter and you’ve caught the latest bug du jour. You call your doctor for an appointment. When you arrive, you’re handed a clipboard and asked to fill out the same repetitive paper form with your health information that you fill out every time you visit. You’re certain they have this information already, but you’re required to fill it out yet again. You might wait 30, 40, or 60 minutes past your appointment time before you’re called back to a room.

Once you’ve made it to an exam room, a nurse comes in to take your vitals. The nurse will ask questions about what medications you are on. Nine times out of ten, the medications the nurse repeats back to you are outdated or entirely incorrect. You wonder where that data came from and are sure you’ve told this particular office the same thing the last four times you’ve gone there, so why is it wrong? Again, you wait in the exam room for the doctor. Your doctor comes in and spends more time looking at a laptop screen and clicking than making eye contact with you. Do you hop on social media and complain? Probably not. Does anybody hear you? No, because you’ve accepted that this is just how it is. In fact, you were grateful to receive a same-day appointment instead of waiting at home in misery.

The technology exists today to make things work and work fast. Other industries have intuitive UIs that people use every single day – we use them so much we don’t think about them. So, why do we settle for what doesn’t work in healthcare? Why do we accept a system that isn’t operating in ways that are beneficial or efficient to us as patients or to our doctors or nurses? Shouldn’t health information technology and the systems that support our health, well-being, and in certain situations, life or death, work more efficiently than our television subscription services or retail websites? Technology can do better in healthcare.

The technology on the back-end of Wal-Mart’s servers was robust enough to handle Black Friday and deploy with over 200 million users online THREE YEARS AGO. Amazing, right? But it’s that way because people won’t accept something that doesn’t work. If Wal-Mart’s website wasn’t available come Cyber Monday, consumers would vote with their dollars and move on to another retailer’s website that did work. That retailer would get all the business. Yet in healthcare, we keep revisiting a system that’s broken – where our health records are disjointed, incomplete, exist in duplicate (or many, many more), and just don’t work well together across practices, hospitals, or health systems. We don’t have a one centralized record with our health information serving as our source of truth. Sharing data across our providers is broken.

I realize that healthcare is more complicated than simply voting with our dollars and moving on, but why is that? The Wharton School Economics Professor Eric K. Clemons wrote a great piece on why healthcare is complicated. The technology is there to help advance healthcare to be what humans need it to be, so when will we stop accepting less? When will we demand more?

There is technology that’s easy to use and access, makes your information available, and centralizes your health information into one record. In our subsequent guest blogs, our experts will talk in more detail about these best of breed technologies and how they can be applied to healthcare to capture, exchange, and share data.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or LinkedIn.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.