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Doing a Proper HIPAA Risk Assessment with Mike Semel

Posted on December 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HIPAA Risk Assessments have become a standard in healthcare. However, not everyone is doing a proper HIPAA Risk Assessment that would hold up to a HIPAA audit.

In this video HealthcareScene.com sits down with HIPAA Expert Mike Semel to discuss the HIPAA Risk Assessment and what a health care organization can do to make sure they’ve done a proper HIPAA Risk Assessment.

Doing a Proper HIPAA Risk Assessment with Mike Semel

Posted on November 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HIPAA Risk Assessments have become a standard in healthcare. However, not everyone is doing a proper HIPAA Risk Assessment that would hold up to a HIPAA audit. In this video, we sits down with HIPAA Expert Mike Semel to discuss the HIPAA Risk Assessment and what a health care organization can do to make sure they’ve done a proper HIPAA Risk Assessment.

Learn more about Mike Semel and his services on the Semel Consulting website.

Full Disclosure: Semel Consulting is a sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Windows Server 2003 Support Ends July 14, 2015 – No Longer HIPAA Compliant

Posted on June 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

If this post feels like groundhog day, then you are probably remembering our previous post about Windows XP being retired and therefore no longer HIPAA compliant and our follow up article about a case where “unpatched and unsupported software” was penalized by OCR as a HIPAA violation.

With those posts as background, the same thing applies to Microsoft ending support for Windows Server 2003 on July 14, 2015. Many of you are probably wondering why I’m talking about a 2003 software that’s being sunset. Could people really still be using this software in healthcare? The simple answer is that yes they are still using Windows Server 2003.

Mike Semel has a really great post about how to deal with the change to ensure you avoid any breaches or HIPAA penalties. In his post he highlights how replacing Windows Server 2003 is a much larger change than it was to replace Windows XP.

In the later case, you were disrupting one user. In the former case, you’re likely disrupting a whole group of users. Plus, the process of moving a server to a new server and operating system is much harder than moving a desktop user to a new desktop. In fact, in most cases the only reason organizations hadn’t moved off Windows XP was because of budget. My guess is that many that are still on Windows Server 2003 are still on it because the migration path to a newer server is hard or even impossible. This is why you better start planning now to move off Windows Server 2003.

I also love this section of Mike Semel’s post linked above which talks about the costs of a breach (which is likely to happen if you continue using unsupported and unpatched software):

The 2015 IBM Cost of a Data Breach Report was just released and the Ponemon Institute determined that a data breach of healthcare records averages $ 398 per record. You are thinking that it would never cost that much to notify patients, hire attorneys, and plug the holes in your network. You’re right. The report goes on to say that almost ¾ of the cost of a breach is in loss of business and other consequences of the breach. If you are a non-profit that means fewer donations. If you are a doctor or a hospital it could mean your patients lose trust and go somewhere else.

I’m sure that some will come on here like they did on the Windows XP post and suggest that you can keep using Windows Server 2003 in a HIPAA compliant manner. This penalty tells me otherwise. I believe it’s a very risky proposition to continue using unsupported and unpatched software. Might there be some edge case where a specific software requires you to use Windows Server 2003 and you could set up some mix of private network/firewalls/access lists and other security to mitigate the risk of a breach of the unsupported software. In theory, that’s possible, but it’s unlikely most of you reading this are in that position. So, you better get to work updating from Windows Server 2003.

Are Legacy EHR Sytems the HIPAA Ticking Time Bomb?

Posted on February 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Healthcare IT and EHR security is a really important topic right now. Many organizations have started to spend time and resources on this problem after a series of healthcare and non-healthcare breaches. The Anthem breach being the most recent. Overall, this is a great thing for the industry since I think there’s more that could be done in every organization to shore up the privacy and security of patient health data.

In a recent conversation I had with Mike Semel, we talked about some of the challenges associated with legacy EHR and Healthcare IT systems in offices. Our conversation prompted to me to ask the question of whether these legacy EHR systems are the ticking time bombs of many healthcare organizations.

Think about what happens to many of these legacy EHR systems. They get put in some back office or under someone’s desk or in some nondescript closet where they’re largely forgotten. In many cases there are only 1-2 people who regularly use them and in many cases the word “regularly” equates to accessing it a few times a month. These few people are usually not technically savvy and know very little about IT security and privacy.

Do I need to ask the question about how good the security is on a system for which most people have forgotten?

These forgotten systems often don’t get any software updates to the application or the operating system. The former is an issue, but the later is a major problem. Remember that when updates to an operating system are issued, it’s essentially blasted out to the public that there are issues that a hacker can exploit. If you’re not updating the O/S, then these systems make for easy pickings for hackers.

Forget about great audit log tracking and other more advanced security on these legacy systems. In most cases, organizations are just trying to limp them along until they can decommission them and put them out to pasture. It makes for one massive security hole for most organizations.

Of course, this doesn’t even take into the account the fear that many organizations have that these systems will just give up the ghost and stop working all together. There’s nothing quite like security on a Windows 2000 Server box sitting under someone’s desk just waiting for it to die. Hopefully those hard drives and other mechanical elements don’t stop before the data’s end of life requirements.

These legacy systems aren’t pretty and likely present a massive HIPAA privacy and security hole in many organizations. If you don’t have a good handle on your legacy systems, now might be a good time to take a look. Better to do it now than to deal with it after a HIPAA breach or HIPAA audit.

Firewall & Windows XP HIPAA Penalties

Posted on December 11, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Anchorage Community Mental Health Services, Inc, has just been assessed a $150,000 penalty for a HIPAA data breach. The title of the OCR bulletin for the HIPAA settlement is telling: “HIPAA Settlement Underscores the Vulnerability of Unpatched and Unsupported Software.” It seems that OCR wanted to communicate clearly that unpatched and unsupported software is a HIPAA violation.

If you’re a regular reader of EMR and HIPAA, then you might remember that we warned you that continued use of Windows XP would be a HIPAA violation since Windows stopped providing updates to it on April 8, 2014. Thankfully, it was one of our most read posts with ~35,000 people viewing it. However, I’m sure many others missed the post or didn’t listen. The above example is proof that using unsupported software will result in a HIPAA violation.

Mike Semel has a great post up about this ruling and he also points out that Microsoft Office 2003 and Microsft Exchange Server 2003 should also be on the list of unsupported software alongside Windows XP. He also noted that Windows Server 2003 will stop being supported on July 14, 2015.

Along with unsuppported and unpatched software, Mike Semel offers some great advice for Firewalls and HIPAA:

A firewall connects your network to the Internet and has features to prevent threats such as unauthorized network intrusions (hacking) and malware from breaching patient information. When you subscribe to an Internet service they often will provide a router to connect you to their service. These devices typically are not firewalls and do not have the security features and update subscriptions necessary to protect your network from sophisticated and ever-changing threats.

You won’t find the word ‘firewall’ anywhere in HIPAA, but the $ 150,000 Anchorage Community Mental Health Services HIPAA penalty and a $ 400,000 penalty at Idaho State University have referred to the lack of network firewall protection.

Anyone who has to protect health information should replace their routers with business-class firewalls that offer intrusion prevention and other security features. It is also wise to work with an IT vendor who can monitor your firewalls to ensure they continue to protect you against expensive and embarrassing data breaches.

Be sure to read Mike Semel’s full article for other great insights on this settlement and what it means.

As Mike aptly points out, many organizations don’t want to incur the cost of updating Windows XP or implementing a firewall. It turns out, it’s much cheaper to do these upgrades than to pay the HIPAA fines for non-compliance. Let alone the hit to your reputation.

The Just Enough Culture of HIPAA Compliance

Posted on September 10, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I was lucky to finally have a long lunch with Mike Semel from Semel Consulting. Ironically, Mike has a home in Las Vegas, but with all of his travel, we’d never had a chance to meet until today. However, we’ve exchanged a lot of emails over the years as he regularly responds to my blog posts. As Mike told me, “It feels like I’ve known you for a long time.” That’s the power of social media in action.

At lunch we covered a lot of ground. Mostly related to HIPAA security and compliance. As I try to process everything we discussed, the thing that stands out most to me is the just enough culture of HIPAA compliance that exists in healthcare. I’ve seen this over and over again and many of the stories Mike shared with me confirm this as well. Many healthcare organizations are doing just enough to get by when it comes to HIPAA compliance.

You might frame this as the “ignorance is bliss” mentality. In fact, I’m not sure if it’s even fair to say that healthcare organizations are doing just enough to comply with HIPAA. Most healthcare organizations are doing just enough to make their conscience feel good about their HIPAA compliance. People like to talk about Steve Jobs “reality distortion field” where he would distort reality in order to accomplish something. I think many in healthcare try and distort the realities of HIPAA compliance so they can sleep good at night and not worry about the consequences that could come upon them.

Ever since HIPAA ombnibus, business associates have to be HIPAA compliant as well. Unfortunately, many of these business associates have their own “reality distortion field” where they tell themselves that their organization doesn’t have to be HIPAA compliant. I don’t see this ending well for many business associates who have a breach.

The solution is not that difficult, but does take some effort and commitment on the part of the organization. The key question shouldn’t be if you’re HIPAA compliant or not. Instead you should focus on creating a culture of security and privacy. Once you do that, the compliance part is so much easier. Those organizations that continue this “just enough” culture of HIPAA compliance are walking a very thin rope. Don’t be surprised when it snaps.