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Uptown Funk Parody by Med Students at WashU Medical Students

Posted on August 14, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday! Time for a little fun Friday video to start your weekend off right. This great parody video from WashU Medical students called “First Year Funk” will work:

From the comments, it looks like this summarizes the First Year Funk for medical students quite well. I love the chorus that keeps repeating, “First year funk you up. First year funk you up.” Must have been a nice break from the challenges of med school.

Elder Care, EMR to Control Doctors, and EMR to Educate Med Students

Posted on December 28, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


I think the elder care market is going to be a great opportunity. However, I wonder if we’re currently ahead of the curve. You have to make so many compromises to really do well in the elder care market. 5-10 years from now you won’t have to make those compromises.


I can definitely see this. I think that EMR can also be used to hold people accountable. Your view on these depends on your position in healthcare and whose using them to control you or hold you accountable.


I really love this concept and I love it paired with the previous tweet. EMR documentation templates can create a framework for med students to learn. Many worry that it will create robotic doctors, but I don’t think that is the case. Implemented properly, it can help med students be less robotic and more effective.

Is Digital Learning The Future For Med Students?

Posted on February 25, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

There are a lot of great apps out there for med students. Because mHealth is going to be so important for future doctors to have a good grasp on, it would be wise for medical programs to implement learning about this technology into curriculum. The University of California Irvine School of Medicine created a program to do just that.

The iMedEd Initiative aims to “[reinvent] the traditional medical school curriculum,” according to the press release. It will include tablet-based learning and portable ultrasound clinical training, which will help build the digital and interactive learning environment. UCI is the first school to do this, but if it’s successful, I imagine it won’t be the last.

The initiative was launched in 2010, and was named the 2012-2013 Apple Distinguished Program of the year. Students receive an iPad, which is loaded with their textbooks, study materials, and instructional materials such as podcasts. With the cost of traditional textbooks, it seems like this program may decrease the cost of medical school, and being able to have everything that is needed to study available on the iPad can be rather convenient as well.

Dr. Ralph V. Clayman, dean of the UC Irvine School of Medicine, offered some insight into the success of the program:

The digital platform has enables us to effectively respond to this responsibility in a manner heretofore unimaginable. By having all aspects of our medical school curriculum on iPad, learning becomes a 24/7 opportunity no longer tied to the classroom or a desk. We believe our students are learning better than they have in the past.

It was also found that the first class participating scored, on average, 23 percent higher on their national exams, as compared to previous med school classes at UC Irvine.

These findings sure seem to show that this is an effective way to teach, and learn. I think it would be great if other programs like this start popping up. Granted, I don’t think traditional teaching should become obsolete. I’m sure there are potential med students out there who would prefer those methods. But it seems like an interesting program that students really will enjoy, and help improve scores as well.

Not an EMR Pessimist

Posted on January 31, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems like from my recent post about the possible reasons Healthcare IT can’t spend $20 billion has some people thinking that it was a negative post about the funding and possibly Healthcare IT/EMR as well.

I can assure you that I am most definitely an optimist in life and EMR. I don’t think I could support and implement an EMR if I wasn’t that way. In fact, that was kind of the purpose of my post about the long term benefits of broad EMR adoption. My point in that post was to suggest that the benefits of broad EMR adoption will be incredible. Just that it’s probably hard for most of us (including myself) to see the possibilities of having an EMR in every doctor’s office.

My hope in highlighting the possible challenges is to hopefully provide a platform for a larger discussion of the issues associated with this unprecedented investment in health care. In fact, I’d say that one of my main goals with this blog is to provide those interested in EMR points to consider when implementing an EMR. I believe information and discussion is powerful and I hope that I’ve helped to make that discussion and information sharing to happen.

What is certain is that I’m very optimistic that we’ll get to broad EMR adoption. It’s inevitable. I’ve met a lot of students in medical schools and they can’t understand why every doctor doesn’t use an EMR. This digital generation of students are digital natives. It’s all they’ve known. Once they finally start entering the marketplace in droves we’re going to see a huge shift in EMR adoption and I believe far fewer failures in the process (along with other reasons).

In fact, it makes me wonder if the reason health care has been slower than almost every other industry to adopt technology is because doctors spend so long in school. These digital natives have just begun entering the health care workforce and so they’re impact hasn’t been felt yet. Just a theory, but at least interesting to consider.