Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Strong Statements from Vinod Khosla at HLTH

Posted on May 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week I had the opportunity to attend a small piece of the new HLTH conference in Las Vegas. My time at the event was cut extremely short as I had to head to Science Camp with 80 5th graders (including my daughter), but I was able to hear the opening keynotes on Sunday. I was most interested in hearing from Vinod Khosla who I don’t always agree with, but he often causes me to look at something a little different or to see the future in a new way. As usual, that’s what he delivered on stage (Between pitches for his companies of course). Here’s a look at some of the pictures and tweets I shared from Vinod’s talk at HLTH.


Needless to say, HLTH was a big event. When you pour $5 million into an event, it better be big. Not to mention the marketing they did for the event. I’m glad to not see HLTH ads on every website I visit now. The turnout for the event seemed good. I saw a lot of social media people there that I know. I was surprised by how many young people were at the conference. Maybe the CEOs they reference in their marketing were a lot of startup CEOs.


This was an extremely powerful and thought provoking statement for me. His assertion is that instead of treating people based on their symptoms, the devices and sensors we use to monitor and measure our health will be so good that these health measurements will drive medicine and not the symptoms we experience. Chew on that concept for a while and you’ll see how it’s not that far fetched even if it is still a ways away.


I’m no expert on medical education, but this does bring up some challenging questions for medical schools. In many ways, it’s similar to what I feel about elementary school for my kids. Sure, there’s a baseline of knowledge that is helpful to understand. However, when it comes to diagnosis, treatment, etc, we’re going to have to seriously consider how we train future doctors. New skills are going to be required to effectively treat a patient. I can’t imagine most medical schools are going to be ready to adapt to this change.


I tweeted this after Vinod talked about all the various tests, labs, etc he’s getting. He sees it as research and suggests that it’s not something that other people should be doing. Vinod seems to have a similar view of health testing as Mark Cuban. Mark Cuban controversial suggested that those who can afford it should do regular blood tests. Opponents argue that it drives unnecessary procedures, unnecessary health fears, and plenty of other issues from over testing. I’ve always felt like there was a balance and it was important for Vinod and Mark to understand these possibilities as they test regularly. However, having this baseline of information could be extremely valuable in discovering what really influences our health.

Some pretty interesting things to think about. Is it very practical for a health IT professional? Probably not and that’s probably why I didn’t see any health IT professionals, CIOs, or other people like that at the HLTH conference. That’s not the goal of the conference really. It seems like there will be another HLTH in 2019. Will be interesting to see what vendors return and who doesn’t.

Of course, some people got distracted at HLTH by the wedding chapel:


Then again, maybe a HLTH Wedding might be a great outcome for some people.

Virtual Reality and Treating Dizziness

Posted on July 20, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Mark Cuban has a pretty amazing post that talks about his experience as an active, engaged patient in his care and how he found virtual reality helped him achieve the desired relief from dizziness that he desired. If you’ve stayed up with the virtual reality space, you’ll find this quite intriguing since virtual reality is often condemned because of the dizziness it causes. Obviously, what you’re watching on VR matters a lot.

Go ahead and read Mark’s full post to see his experience as an active patient trying to deal with his Dizziness. We’ll be here when you get back. You can also watch this video he made:

It’s pretty amazing how active Mark Cuban was in his care. Sure, he has the money to be as active as possible. He literally was looking at buying a massive medical device or even investing in a business to bring the treatment he wanted to Dallas. That’s extraordinary and something that most of us can’t do as patients.

For those who haven’t read the whole story, Mark Cuban was getting treatment in California that was helping him with his dizziness from Dizziland.com. However, he couldn’t stay in California to finish the treatment. That’s when he discovered that the Samsung VR set he had might be the solution to creating a portable solution for him. Turns out, it did the trick for him. As a true businessman, he’s now working with the company to commercialize the product.

To be clear, this device setup is not FDA approved. It’s something that Mark found and tried that worked for him. We won’t be seeing doctors prescribing this for a while to come. Although, it will be interesting to see if and how solutions like this do go to market. Will they need to be FDA approved? Will they be regulated? How much will they cost? Lots of interesting questions since the videos and technology to watch them are quite cheap.

I love the story of technology making an impact on someone’s health for good. I also love seeing an active patient taking a serious interest in their care. Although, it’s amazing how a billionaire’s interest in their health is similar to any person with a major health issue.

Mark Cuban’s Suggestion to Do Regular Blood Tests

Posted on April 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been really intrigued by the tweets from Mark Cuban and the response from many to his tweets from those in the healthcare IT community. Here’s a summary of the 3 tweets which ignited the discussion:

  1. If you can afford to have your blood tested for everything available, do it quarterly so you have a baseline of your own personal health
  2. create your own personal health profile and history. It will help you and create a base of knowledge for your children, their children, etc
  3. a big failing of medicine = we wait till we are sick to have our blood tested and compare the results to “comparable demographics”

My friends Dan Munro and Gregg Masters have both been writing a lot about the subject, but there are many others as well. They’ve been hammering Mark Cuban for “giving medical advice” to people when he’s not a doctor. I find these responses really ironic since many of the people who are railing against Mark Cuban are the same people who are calling for us to take part in the quantified self movement.

What I think these people who rail against Mark Cuban want to say is: Don’t misunderstand what Mark’s saying. More testing doesn’t always improve healthcare. In fact, more testing can often lead to a lot of unneeded healthcare.

This is a noble message that’s worthy of sharing. However, I think Mark Cuban understands this. That’s why one of his next tweets told people to get the tests, but don’t show the results to their doctors until they’re sick. In fact, Mark even suggests in his tweets that the history of all these tests could be beneficial to his children and their children. He also calls it a baseline. Mark’s not suggesting that people get these blood tests as a screening for something, but as a data store of health data that could be beneficial sometime in the future.

How is Mark Cuban storing the results of a bunch of blood tests any different than him storing the results from his fitbit or other health sensor?

One problem some people have pointed out is that if you’re doing these blood tests as a baseline, then what if the blood tests weren’t accurate? Then, you’d be making future medical decisions based on a bunch of incorrect data. This is an important point worth considering, but it’s true of any health history. Plus, how are we suppose to make these blood tests more accurate? If the Mark Cuban’s of the world want to be our guinea pigs and do all these blood tests, that’s fine with me. Having them interested in the data could lead to some breakthroughs in blood testing that we wouldn’t have discovered otherwise.

Along with improving the quality of the data the tests produce, it’s possible that having all of this data could help people discover something they wouldn’t have otherwise seen. Certainly any of these possible discoveries should go through the standard clinical trial process before being applied to patients broadly. However, researchers only have so much time and so many resources to commit to clinical trials. Could all the data from a wide swatch of blood tests better help a research identify which research or clinical trials are worth pursuing first? I think so.

For me it all goes back to the wide variety of health sensors that are hitting the market. A blood test is just a much more powerful test than many of the health sensors we see on the market today. So, the warning to be careful about what you read into all these blood tests is an incredibly important message. However, with that fair warning, I don’t see any problem with Mark’s suggestion. In fact, I think all of the extra data could lead to important discoveries that improve the quality of the tests and what measurements really matter.