Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Communal Themes Between Behavioral Health and General Healthcare – #NatCon16

Posted on March 7, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Instead of getting a break after HIMSS, I’m doing back to back conferences as I attend the National Council for Behavioral Health’s NatCon Conference in Las Vegas. If you’re following along at home, the twitter stream for the event is #NatCon16 and is full of a ton of gems from the conference.
Chris Matthews and John Lynn at NatCon
Today I got the chance to hear and meet two of the keynote speakers: Chris Matthews and @KevinMD. Chris Matthews provided a lot of great insights into the political environment and a lot of amazing insider stories. My biggest takeaway from his talk is that we’re stuck in a massive quagmire and I don’t see much of that changing in the future. Presidential candidates can make all the promises they want, but they mean nothing if they don’t have the political support and finances to pay for it. @KevinMD was great to meet and hear talk about the benefits of using social media. Of course, he was mostly preaching to the choir for me. However, I’m sure that his comments were extremely eye opening for many in the audience.
KevinMD and John Lynn
Besides these two keynotes, I attended a few different sessions in the tech track of the conference. The most surprising thing to me was how similar these sessions were to any sessions you might have in any healthcare IT conference. This wasn’t really shocking, but it was a surprise that the messages and challenges were so much the same. Here are a few examples:

Third Party App Integration with EHRs
In one session, the vendors were talking about their inability to integrate their behavioral health apps into the various EHR software. They all said it was on the roadmap, but that there wasn’t an easy way for them to make it a reality. One of them appropriately called for EMR customers to start demanding that their EHR vendors open up their systems to be able to integrate with these third party apps.

Fear of Social Media
I usually find at conferences that this breaks out into two groups. One group loves social media, embraces it and benefits from it. The other group is totally afraid of the repercussions of using it. @KevinMD offered some great insights on how to overcome this fear. First, don’t say anything on social media that you wouldn’t say in a crowded hospital hallway. Second, start by using something like LinkedIn or Doximity which is a more private type of social media and are both professional networks. The real key I’d suggest is that you should own your brand. Don’t leave your brand image up to other people.

Business Models
There was a lot of discussion around various uses of technology in behavioral health and the need for the business models to catch up with the technology. Many would love to use all these technological advances, but they aren’t sure how they’re going to get paid for doing so.

I’m sure I could go on and on. I know that many in the general medical field look at behavioral health as a totally different beast. No doubt there are some differences in behavioral health, but I think that we’re more alike than we are different. Looking forward to learning even more over the next two days.

Tips For Doctors Entering the Social Media World

Posted on June 13, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about physicians and social media. Since then, I read another article about why physician’s should get involved. Mike Sevilla, M.D., a family physicians and blogger, listed six reasons and told his journey with social media over the years at the Connecting Healthcare + Social Media Conference a few weeks ago. The reasons he gave were:

1. To tell your story

2. To find a community

3. To express opinions and commentary

4. To discover what you are passionate about

5. To conduct social media marketing

6. To manage your online reputation and streamline your practice

The article I linked to goes into more details, but as I thought about it, these seemed like some very helpful tips. Let me talk about number six for awhile. When I was searching for a OB/GYN, and later, a pediatrician, I read pages and pages of reviews for doctors. It amazed me how many negative reviews were on there. I mean, some of they could have been justified, sure, but I felt bad for some of the doctors that might not have even known those reviews were out there and had no way to defend themselves. My doctor was incredible, but a few disgruntled patients wrote terrible reviews online about him, which probably pushed people away from going to him. If a doctor is involved with social media, whether it be Facebook, Twitter, or even just reading comment boards, he or she may be able to defend their reputation, and then create a better image with their patients. I’ve found that when I’ve become friends with past teachers, employers, or co-workers, my opinion of them almost always changed. I saw that they were human — they had friends, family, likes, dislikes…everything.

I think a lot of these tips point to one thing — bettering your image and becoming involved. I think that’s great. There is definitely an art to social media, and not every doctor is going to be great at it. However, over at mHIMSS.com, web content producer for Healthcare IT News Michelle McNickle created a great list of 10 physicians to follow on Twitter. You can find more out about each of the site I just linked to, but for conveniences sake, here is the list:

1. Kevin Pho, MD — @kevinmd

2. Mike Sevilla, MD — @drmikesevilla

3. Val Jones, MD — @drval

4. Tim Sturgill, MD — @SymTym

5. Bertalan Meskó, MD — @berci

6. Shelley Binkley, MD — @healthewoman

7. Mark Browne, MD — @consultdoc

8. Joseph Kim, MD — @DrJosephKim

9. Jay Parkinson, MD — @jayparkinson

10. Mehmet Oz, MD — @DrOz

So, if you are a doctor, follow the above tips to start your journey into the social media world. And for anyone who wants to have daily tips, ideas, or thoughts from doctors, you might start by taking a look at the 10 doctors mentioned above.

New Friend Request…From the Family Doctor?

Posted on May 11, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

It seems like every company, person, or product has a Facebook page nowadays. I’m not complaining — I actually really like being able to connect through Facebook. Several months ago, I noticed quite a few pages for hospitals or doctors popping up, and I even “liked” a few of them myself. After “liking” them, I didn’t think much of it, until one day I saw an update from one, Intermountain Moms. Apparently, every week, “Nurse Dani” answers the questions of moms everywhere. Simply write a question under the status update, and she answers it.

I thought this was pretty neat. In fact, I asked my own question. It was something that I felt silly calling my son’s pediatrician about but was worrying me. Within a matter of minutes, Nurse Dani responded to my question. Not only did she put my nerves to rest, but she was so kind in answering. It felt like I was talking to an old friend. As I read the rest of her responses to other mom’s questions, the same respect was given. And while I’m not about to start text messaging my nurses and doctors (so not ready for that kind of relationship), I think it’s nice that more health professionals are getting involved with their patients through social networking.

According to an article on US News, doctors across the country are connecting through Facebook, Twitter, and FourSquare. Apparently, there is a website called TwitterDoctors.net, which is essentially a place where doctors who “tweet” register their names and make it easy for patients to find them. This article talks about how different doctors are implementing social networking into their websites. Here is a little bit of what the author said:

Some doctors are latching onto social media to issue real-time alerts and reminders, a unarguably valuable service for time-pressed patients. Stream cites colleagues who tweet when they’re running late for appointments, for instance, so patients know they needn’t rush to the office. Others post hours for flu shot clinics and encourage patients not to overlook the vaccine.

To me, I think this is great. I would love to have these types of updates readily available. Who likes waiting at the doctor’s office? Recently, when we took my son to his well-child appointment, we waited an hour in the waiting room. Or being able to post my concerns or questions and receive instant feedback, especially concerning menial topics that are worrying me but may not warrant a doctor’s visit?

I can see some downsides to this though. The professional relationship between doctors, nurses, etc. with their patients might become a bit blurry. There should definitely be limits. Like, should patients and their doctors be actual Facebook friends? When I graduated from high school, I remember becoming friends with some of my former teachers. They refused to add students that were currently still in school, and I can see why. Once someone in a position of trust (i.e., a teacher or doctor) becomes more intimately invovled in one of their student’s or patient’s life, things can get weird.

But in general, as I’ve already said, I love that practitioners are becoming involved in social networking. Like it or not, that’s the way the world is going, and I think it would be wise for doctor’s to know at least the simple parts of social networking (and maybe hire a tech-savvy office assistant to manage the Facebook page).  As the article I previously mentioned quotes Kevin Pho, a medical blogger, saying:

These are powerful, tremendously influential tools. Doctors should be taking advantage of the opportunity.”

So what do you think? Is it a good thing that doctors and hospitals are getting involved with patients through social networks, or is it making the doctor-patient relationship too casual?

Eloquent EMR and EHR Notes

Posted on October 2, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I came across a tweet by the infamous @kevinmd that struck me. I think it really caught my attention, because I’ve been:
1. Reading a lot of complaints from people about the verbose EHR note
2. Seeing a lot of relatively new EHR software demo EHR notes that aren’t verbose at all.

Here’s the tweet:
@kevinmd – Kevin Pho, M.D.
The loss of eloquence in EMR notes is.gd/Tqf6Y3

The article linked at the end of that tweet is a pretty interesting read. The author compares the eloquence of a dictated note versus one from an EMR. It was an interesting read since the author was a self proclaimed lover of their EMR. However, they weren’t a big fan of the EMR notes (unlike the Happy EMR Doctor who had someone praise his EMR note).

What I’ve been seeing lately in the EMR world is a revolution around the quality of the EMR note. I’m not yet ready to declare the verbose, lengthy, unreadable EMR notes dead yet, but this revolution in quality, relevant note creation will get us there. I look forward to the day when I can post “Death of the Long, Unreadable EMR Note.”