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How e-Prescribing Features Improve Your Practice Life

Posted on July 9, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Dr. Tom Giannulli, CMIO at Kareo.

e-Prescribing, the process of electronically fulfilling a medication prescription directly from your practice, is far from new. In fact, this service has been around long enough that the majority of patients have come to expect the convenience that accompanies it.

Most private practices are using some type of medical software that aids in the e-Prescribing process. Some may have incorporated said software because they felt obligated, but others have realized that an integrated software solution can do more than help meet the requirements for the meaningful use electronic health record (EHR) initiative.

They recognize that it may also help to improve their practice.

As the clinical leader for an electronic health record (EHR) vendor serving independent practices, I can attest that Kareo’s cloud-based software is designed with the intent to improve the unique needs of the private practice. The changes in regulations and requirements might mean you should change the way you practice, but it doesn’t have to reduce the personal connection between patients and their providers.

Improve Upon Value-Based Care

Value-based care is driven by data and has required practices to become more efficient and effective in order to reduce overall healthcare costs.

Without the automated support that accompanies e-prescribing, compiling the number of required reports could become overwhelming and significantly reduce your efficiency. Our software can make compiling this data with accurate reports both simple and manageable, which saves you valuable time. It makes tracking the quality metrics related to drug compliance much easier, but it’s also tracking quality by:

  • Helping to reduce your liability with legible prescriptions
  • Improving upon prescription accuracy
  • Reducing medication errors
  • Improving upon patient compliance
  • Monitoring fraud and abuse from duplicate prescriptions

Having an automated perspective on drug interactions and prescription history at your fingertips allows you to focus on measures that improve preventative care. This global perspective on each patient’s individual treatment can potentially reduce abuse and readmissions.

Leverage a “Heads Up” Philosophy

You won’t hear many, if any, physicians state that they chose medicine for the abundance of paperwork.

The time EHR can save on administrative tasks provides the physician with more time to do what they enjoy—care for their patients. Patients often choose a practice because they want that personal connection with their physician. Someone who knows their story, and is aware of their health history. Most patients don’t enjoy waiting while the physician is writing notes, asking them to repeat their medical history, or trying to find the correct button on the computer. This won’t help to increase patient satisfaction, and gain patient loyalty. With the information right in front of you, you have more time to devote to quality communication, which gains your patient’s trust.

There are several secondary key benefits to practicing “Heads Up” Medicine with e-prescribing that help improve the patient experience by devoting your attention to your patient, not your computer. You’re still getting the essential information with an easy method of information collection by pointing and clicking.

  • Reviewing key points and a simple question and answer interview can help you build your narrative.
  • Your EHR is accessible on a mobile device, such an IPad, and not just on a website
  • You don’t have to spend the extra time typing the narrative in each time and starting from scratch.

Save Significant Time

Time is valuable to you, and your patients. The time saved with automated support does more than make your patients happy by getting them in and out of their visit quicker, it also shows that you respect their time.

Less time waiting and more time with their providers often results in better patient satisfaction. Word of mouth is often the most effective form of marketing and satisfied patients refer new patients to help you continue to grow your business.

Our software takes care of the bulk of your work with chart, bill and fill to reduce administrative tasks and improve your workflow. It helps you write the note, ensures that you get the billing codes correct and fills the prescription and orders lab work. This allows you to improve your workflow by:

  • Getting the billing done quickly and accurately to expedite payment
  • Allowing you to see more patients in the same amount of time
  • Helping you gain a better balance between your work and personal life to reduce the risk of burnout
  • Making sure your patients don’t leave because of extended wait times

Maintain a Personal Connection

Engaging more with your clients can foster patient satisfaction and loyalty to your practice. Your patients want compassionate care provided and human interaction, and you can leverage this “heads up” philosophy with the simple solutions offered in EHR software to manage the bulk of your administrative work.

Seek out technology and service solutions to improve your practice, increase patient satisfaction and provide you with more time to focus on priorities to aid in the growth of your practice, rather than being burdened with administrative tasks. Because you chose to work in private practice for the patients, not the paperwork.

About Tom Giannulli, MD, MS
Tom Giannulli, MD, MS, is the chief medical information officer at Kareo, a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. He is a respected innovator in the medical technology arena with more than 15 years of deep experience in mobile technology and medical software development. 

5 Steps to Ensure Revenue Integrity After Implementing a New EHR

Posted on June 18, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

In the rush to implement EHRs for Meaningful Use incentives, many practices lost sight of what matters most for continued success—revenue integrity, says Joette Derricks, healthcare compliance and revenue integrity consultant in Baltimore, MD. Revenue integrity—the idea that practices must take proactive steps to capture and retain revenue—isn’t a novel concept. However, it’s becoming increasingly important for physician practices operating in a regulatory-driven environment, she adds.

Revenue integrity is also an important part of ensuring smooth cashflow during and after the transition to a new EHR, says Derricks. This is a time when revenue opportunities are easily overlooked as practices adjust to new navigation, templates, and more, she adds.

Revenue integrity is all about compliance, says Derricks. “It’s about taking a holistic approach to operational efficiency, regulatory compliance, and maximizing reimbursement,” she adds. “It’s about doing things the right way.”

Maximizing reimbursement isn’t about ‘gaming’ the system to upcode. Rather, it’s about implementing processes and procedures to ensure that practices are paid for all of the services they perform without leaving money on the table or generating revenue that payers will later recoup, she explains.

Derricks provides five simple steps practices can take to ensure revenue integrity following an EHR implementation:

1. Review EHR templates. Do templates include the most specific CPT and ICD-10-CM codes? And do physicians understand the importance of avoiding unspecified codes, when possible?

2. Examine the interface between the EHR and practice management system. Do the codes that physicians assign in the EHR feed correctly into the practice management system? For example, when a physician performs an E/M service in addition to a procedure, does the EHR map both codes to the practice management system for billing purposes? Does the practice management system correctly bundle and unbundle services, when appropriate?

3. Run your numbers frequently. Ideally, practices will perform a monthly data analysis to help gauge performance and identify potential missed revenue opportunities, says Derricks. For example, she suggests running a report of the practice’s top 20 billing codes in a particular month. Then, compare those codes with the top 20 codes the practice billed that same month in the previous year. What has changed, and why? And have these changes benefited or hurt the practice? For example, practices may see new codes in that list because they added chronic care or transitional care management, both of which provide additional revenue. Or practices may discover a system glitch that incorrectly bundled services that are separately payable, thus causing a revenue loss.

“Everybody can play the ‘I’m too busy’ game, but this is too important to fall into that trap,” says Derricks. “I applaud the office manager or practice administrator who recognizes the value of constantly being on the lookout for system-wide improvements and analyzing their own numbers.”

Some practice management systems provide robust billing analytics that can help practices identify the root cause of billing errors and omissions. Working with a consultant is another option, says Derricks. Consultants provide unbiased input regarding inefficiencies and vulnerabilities and can provide a ‘fresh set of eyes’ necessary to effect change. They also often have access to benchmarking tools and other resources that can help practices identify revenue gaps and delays, she adds.

For example, Derricks suggests performing an assessment for revenue gaps and roadblocks to reduce the workflow process errors that delay revenue. Download the assessment.

4. Provide physician training. Physicians need thorough training on how to use the EHR properly so as to avoid data omissions, says Derricks. They also need annual training on new CPT and ICD-10-CM codes as well as new documentation requirements, she adds.

5. Create an environment that promotes compliance. This requires a top-down approach from physicians and practice managers, says Derricks. “Everyone should have their eyes open and feel comfortable being able to address concerns,” she says. “It should be an open-door policy in terms of looking at processes versus putting your head down.”

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Why Physician Practices Need a MIPS Expert on Staff

Posted on April 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Marina Verdara, Sr. Training Specialist for CMS Incentive Programs, Kareo.

Healthcare providers go to school to learn how to care for patients, and that’s what they do best. However, billing processes, performance-based payment adjustments, and payment incentives are typically not included in this education. Being responsible for today’s regulatory complexities and workload may not have been what providers envisioned for their career. And it’s taking a toll. Nearly half of physician practices spend more than $40,000 per full-time physician per year on complying with Medicare payment and incentive programs, according to an MGMA survey. These costs factor in loss of physician productivity and staff training needs, along with IT expenses.

Independent practices must find a way to streamline the CMS incentive program reporting process. One important way to do this is by designating a “MIPS expert” among your staff. This could be your lead clinician or another manager who has oversight of patient encounter documentation.  While 2017 reporting is done, now is the time to specify the MIPS expert so they can ensure compliance throughout all of 2018.  Don’t wait until 2018 is done to specify your MIPS expert.

MIPS Recap

In 2015, The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced new goals for value-based payments in Medicare that changed your practice’s payment structure. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) and the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) introduced a system where providers receive payment based on the value and quality of services provided, not the volume. These changes repealed the Sustainable Growth Rate Formula, streamlined multiple quality reporting programs into MIPS, and provided incentive payments for participation in Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs).

HHS made these changes as the first steps to creating a Medicare for healthier people. Their goals are to create a Medicare system that will be here for generations to come while also providing open, flexible, and user-centered health information.

Navigating The System

This sounds like a great plan, right? But, how do you keep up with the frequent MIPS changes and alerts while maintaining a successful private practice?

You need a MIPS expert.

You wouldn’t leave your busy practice in the hands of a mechanic, and you shouldn’t leave your billing and incentive payments in the hands of someone who doesn’t understand MACRA and MIPS. You need an internal staff member who is your MIPS champion. This is the person who can partner with your EHR vendor to ensure that the eligible providers in your practice earn the highest incentive available, as well as avoid any negative penalties. In my role of training practices on implementing a streamlined CMS reporting system, I can tell you that practices with a designated MIPS expert are much more successful and efficient in their MIPS reporting process—and these are the practices that are earning the highest possible score.

Invest in the education and training of your internal MIPS expert so you can be confident that your practice is among the highest earners.

3 Reasons You Need a MIPS Expert at Your Practice

1. A MIPS expert will help maximize your payments. MIPS is all about streamlining your practice to become more efficient in how you diagnose and improve patient outcomes. When you do this well and report your data, you increase your chances of earning a positive payment adjustment.  

Participating in MIPS earns you a payment adjustment according to evidence-based and practice-specific quality data. The better the quality of your data, the better your chances of earning a positive payment adjustment.  

Your MIPS expert will understand the details of the MIPS program. They should be familiar with the activities and measures that are most meaningful to your practice. Your MIPS expert can help your eligible clinicians select measures that best apply to the specialty to prove their performance and maximize their payments.

2. A MIPS expert will be your education partner. This staff member should stay educated and informed of the latest regulatory details. Here at Kareo, we notify eligible clinicians and the designated MIPS expert of ongoing education opportunities. These are offered on a set schedule and as needed with new changes to MACRA and MIPS.

3. A MIPS expert will mobilize your practice staff and clinicians. To successfully meet MIPS requirements, the entire practice needs to be engaged. The MIPS expert can partner up with your EHR vendor to ensure that eligible clinicians in your practice understand the MIPS requirements and know how to navigate through the system. In this process, your practice can identify areas where any given workflow should be modified to earn the highest possible score and receive maximum payment for the great care they deliver.

Resources for Your MIPS Expert

As we mentioned above, MIPS experts at independent practices must stay up to date on all MIPS alerts and resources available to you through the Quality Payment Program. They should take time to educate themselves, understand changes, and read all alerts provided by Medicare or by their EHR vendors.

Your MIPS expert should be able to find an education partner using one or both of these paths:   

  1. Your Regional Extension Center: Contact them to ask questions and get connected with a MIPS education partner.
  2. Your Electronic Health Record company: As an example, Kareo has MIPS training specialists who can partner with your MIPS expert to help maximize payments, stay up to date on the latest changes, and provide support. We have training sessions and ideas for implementation of new workflow processes.  

Don’t be intimidated by the complexity of MIPS. Take time to designate a MIPS expert on your staff and get them connected to their education partner today.

About Marina Verdara
Marina is a Sr. Training Specialist guiding Kareo customers to higher levels of success with their CMS Incentive Program reporting, including MIPS and Meaningful Use. Marina has over seven years of experience working directly with several hundred small practice clinicians on a variety of projects specializing on CMS Incentive programs such as Meaningful Use, PQRS, and MACRA. Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

The Win-Win of Today’s Telemedicine Technology for All Practices

Posted on March 22, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sean Brindley, Product Development Manager, Kareo Telemedicine

The healthcare profession has been talking about telemedicine and its potential benefits almost as long as there have been phones. Over the last five years, adoption of telemedicine programs has increased steadily, but for some practices, particularly smaller, independent offices, the questions loom larger. How disruptive will adopting telemedicine be to office workflow? Will telemedicine overburden office staff? What are the risks involved in trying it? How will they get reimbursed for the investment? And, most important, what benefits can telemedicine bring to the individual practice that offset the impact of the learning curve?

Unlike even one or two years ago, today’s answers are mostly positive.

Reimbursement Is Real

Let’s tackle the big question first – reimbursement. Starting at the simplest point, most practices today give away a lot of practitioner time in telephone consults that are not reimbursable. Finding a way to generate revenue on even some of those would be a boon to most practices. But the news is far more positive than that. Thirty-five states, plus eight more pending, have enacted telemedicine parity requiring certain payers to pay for telemedicine consultations just as they would reimburse face-to-face visits. Private payers have been at the forefront of telemedicine adoption, likely recognizing telemedicine as a highly cost-effective delivery system for healthcare.  At the same time, a recent bill (The Creating High-Quality Results and Outcomes Necessary to Improve Chronic (CHRONIC) Care Act of 2017), has relaxed the restriction on Medicare reimbursements for telemedicine, and while Medicaid reimbursement varies substantially from state to state, there are places where the reimbursement practices go further than Medicare. All practices should carefully review the rules and regulations in their states. Parity doesn’t always mean parity. This is why it’s an advantage to have a telemedicine visit option that’s built into the EHR and practice management system, not a separate application. This ensures a smooth reimbursement process. For example, in Kareo when a video appointment is scheduled, the system automatically verifies that the patient is covered for telemedicine. This removes much of the burden from the office staff and greatly increases the chances that the telemedicine program will provide a revenue stream for the office.

What’s In It For Practices?

Beyond the potential for reimbursing telemedicine visits, how will telemedicine impact the operation of offices? First, telemedicine can increase the number of daily or weekly visits without increasing the practitioner’s work hours because visits conducted via most well-designed telemedicine systems take less time than an in-person visit. For example, a practice with three providers who each add two video visits per day, at an average reimbursement of $72, will earn an extra $103,680 in revenue over the course of a year. Telemedicine also greatly reduces the number of no-shows and cancellations. Patients with a telemedicine appointment are less likely to cancel because of work issues, transportation, child care, or just plain forgetting. An office appointment that has to be cancelled at the last minute can even be changed to a video visit, keeping the patient on track and not wasting the practitioner’s time. Having telemedicine available makes a practice more competitive against the rising number of “convenient” healthcare outlets like urgent care, walk-ins and on-demand care.

What’s In It For Patients?

Perhaps most important, telemedicine has the potential to improve patient health and increase quality outcomes since it provides an easy way to stay in ongoing touch with patients. The best use cases are for routine follow-up care where the appointment does not require a physical examination. For example, ideal cases for video visits are ongoing care for chronic conditions, observing treatment plans, reviewing slightly abnormal lab results, providing prescription updates, and discussing lifestyle changes for weight loss, smoking cessation and much more. Better quality outcomes also mean better reimbursement under today’s quality-driven healthcare system. Some of the specialties regularly using telemedicine are:

  • Primary Care
  • OB/GYN
  • Neurology
  • Nephrology
  • Mental/Behavioral Health
  • Gastroenterology
  • Endocrinology
  • Cardiology
  • Dermatology
  • Pulmonology
  • Infectious Disease
  • Urology
  • Hematology/Oncology

How Much Impact on Staff?

Traditionally, many providers have offered separate applications for telemedicine, which required additional steps and training for office staff, making it more difficult to implement, especially for small practices. However, telemedicine is now more feasible for all practices because new technology from Kareo integrates telemedicine seamlessly into the EHR platform. For example, our customers can schedule telemedicine appointments directly in their practice management system, maintaining current office workflow for scheduling, charting and billing with no extra steps or training required. The automatic eligibility verification removes much of the financial burden and produces on average 10 times the provider’s cost per visit.  Patients can request appointments online and conduct the visit through a mobile device or desktop.

Removing the Risk

In busy practices, all changes can feel risky in terms of impact on staff, patients and investment costs. The integration of telemedicine with popular EHR platforms removes much of the impact on staff. Since more than 64 percent of patients say they would be happy to have a telemedicine video appointment, the offering to patients is far more positive than negative. Finally, the investment risk has dropped to minimal. EHR providers that offer software-as-a service, such as Kareo, are now giving practices a chance to pay per telemedicine visit, thereby being charged only for what they use. These low per-visit fees reduce the start-up burden on small practices, so the financial risk drops to negligible. In this way the office can implement a telemedicine practice at its own pace, allowing reimbursements to keep pace with usage.

Chances are good that even the overworked independent practice can use today’s telemedicine technology as an opportunity to increase revenue, unburden staff, and enhance patient satisfaction with the most minimal of investments. After years of promise, telemedicine has become a win-win

About Sean Brindley
Sean Brindley is product development manager for Kareo Telemedicine. More information can be found on Kareo’s Go Practice blog.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

5 Ways Your Certified EHR Can Help Boost Your MIPS Score

Posted on February 5, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

How did you do in the first year of reporting under the Quality Payment Program? Are you expecting a negative payment adjustment under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS)? Or did you only submit the minimum data necessary in 2017 to avoid this adjustment? The good news is that you can get on track to report critical MIPS measures in 2018 that will safeguard and perhaps even enhance your revenue in 2020 and beyond.

In fact, your electronic health record (EHR) technology may already include various features that can help increase your MIPS score, says Marina Verdara, senior training specialist at Kareo. All you need to do is take advantage of them. Verdara discusses five ways in which medical practices should be able to capitalize on their EHR to improve performance under MIPS.

  1. Use an EHR Certified With the 2015 Criteria

Technology certified using the 2015 criteria supports interoperability across the care continuum, and it also enables physicians to earn additional revenue under MIPS, says Verdara. According to the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act final rule, physicians earn a one-time bonus of 10 percentage points under the advancing care information (ACI) performance category of MIPS when they report objectives and measures using only 2015 edition certified electronic health record technology during calendar year 2018. In 2018, 25% of a physician’s MIPS score is tied to ACI.

“The federal rule indicates the clinician will earn a 10% bonus to their ACI score if they report using only a 2015 CEHRT, but they will determine this based on the measures submitted,” Verdara explains. “Therefore, a clinician can switch anytime during 2018 as long as they can report at least 90 days for the ACI category.”

In addition to this bonus, clinicians are eligible to receive a bonus of 10 percentage points applied to the ACI category if they report Stage 3 objectives and measures, says Verdara. They can do this if their certified EMR can document and track these measures. Refer to Table 7 in the MACRA final rule for more information about these measures.

  1. Choose Applicable Quality Measures

In 2018, 50% of your MIPS score is based on the quality measures you submit. Your 2015 Certified EHR should support your quality measure selection. “For instance, our physicians have an easy-to-use tool within our EHR that prompts them to narrow down measures that are most applicable for their specialty,” says Verdara. Customers can contact them directly for more information about each measure, its specifications, and what CMS is looking for when calculating numerators and denominators.

When using your EHR to choose measures, Verdara suggests running a report for all of the quality measures your vendor supports, including those you may not plan to submit for attestation. That’s because the data could reveal one or more measures you hadn’t anticipated as advantageous for your practice that could ultimately boost your score, she adds.

Examine the entire report, and identify your top 10 measures (i.e., those on which you’ve performed most effectively). Now dig into the data. Are each of these measures applicable for your specialty? If so, focus on data capture for those 10 measures. If some of your top 10 measures are in other specialties, eliminate those from your workflow and choose ones that are relevant. “Make sure you understand how to document and improve the score for that measure,” says Verdara.

Ultimately, submit all 10 measures to CMS even though only six are required, says Verdara. During the submission process, the CMS attestation website automatically scores each measure based on available benchmarks, and physicians have an opportunity to remove the measures on which they’ve performed most poorly prior to final submission.

  1. Don’t Overlook Reporting Opportunities

Your EHR should be looking out for reporting opportunities so that you can focus on patient care. Verdara provides the example of smoking cessation counseling. Physicians commonly perform this type of counseling but may not receive credit under MIPS because they don’t check the box indicating the work was done. “We have built-in guides to help physicians understand why they might be missing out on a particular quality metric,” says Verdara, adding that physicians should be able to look to their EHR to prompt and guide them to understand where missed opportunities may lie.

  1. Use Clinical Decision Support to Enhance MIPS Performance

Your EHR should also provide prompts to remind physicians about age- and condition-specific preventive screenings and care that, when provided to patients, can help improve MIPS scores. Physicians using Kareo, for example, can improve performance on MIPS measures related to influenza and age-specific immunizations as well as screening for clinical depression, high blood pressure, and more, all of which directly translate to higher scores, says Verdara. “It helps the physician provide better care,” she adds. “It’s a win-win for the clinician and the patient.”

  1. Run Clinical Reports to Pinpoint Opportunities for Care Improvement

MIPS reports not only allow for attestation, but they also help practices understand what they do well—and what needs improvement, says Verdara. For example, practices tracking patients whose hemoglobin A1C is greater than 9% during the performance period can use this report for MIPS attestation and to improve outcomes. More specifically, they can reach out to patients with a poor A1C to provide additional counseling and guidance. “This is a good one to track because diabetes is an epidemic,” says Verdara. “It helps practices target patients who are non-compliant.” The same is true for measures related to controlling high blood pressure and asthma.

To learn more about MACRA, visit https://qpp.cms.gov/.

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Why Clinicians Need a 2015 Certified EHR

Posted on January 11, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

What does “2015 Certified EHR” mean to practicing clinicians? The once-flooded EHR market is now whittling down to those vendors equipped to respond to regulatory and industry changes. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology listed more than 4,000 EHRs with 2014 certification criteria, according to the most recent data from healthIT.gov. And to date, only about 200 EHRs have passed the rigorous 2015 certification criteria.

However, beyond the fact that 2015 is indeed the most recent certification criteria as issued by the HHS, why should medical practices care?  

When vendors certify their EHRs, physicians—and patients—are ultimately the beneficiaries, says Beth Onofri, EHR and industry advisor at Kareo, who led the 2015 Certification process for the Kareo Clinical EHR. Physicians benefit because the technology allows them to easily attest that they’ve met quality requirements specified in the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). This includes Advancing Care Information (ACI)-related measures that help physicians boost their payments. ACI accounts for 25 percent of a physician’s performance score that dictates reimbursement under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Patients benefit because they’re able to access and exchange their own health information more easily than ever before. It’s a win-win all around, says Onofri.

“The 2015 criteria require functionality supporting unprecedented patient engagement, care coordination, and information exchange, all of which bodes well for physicians striving to improve outcomes.”
—Beth Onofri, EHR and Industry Advisor at Kareo

Although using a certified EHR is important, implementing one that’s certified using only the 2015 criteria (not the 2014 criteria or a combination of the two) is a critical piece of the puzzle under MACRA, says Onofri. EHRs certified with the 2015 criteria help pave the way for physicians to receive a bonus in 2018. In addition, the 2015 criteria require functionality that supports unprecedented patient engagement, care coordination, and information exchange, all of which bodes well for physicians striving to improve outcomes.

Still, many physicians aren’t aware of how the 2015 certification criteria can help their practices, says Onofri.

Of the 60 different 2015 certification criteria, Onofri says these five are particularly helpful for practices seeking to improve the quality of the care they provide, ultimately fostering accurate payments under value-based payment reform:

1. View, download, and transmit health information to a third party

The 2015 criteria require a secure method of access (usually through a patient portal) as well as the ability to send information to an unsecured email address of the patient’s choice, says Onofri. The idea is that offering various access options improves overall patient engagement and outcomes.

She suggests creating a brochure that explains to patients how they can access and use the portal, including how to view, download, and transmit their health information. Another idea is to recruit a volunteer who can show patients how to use the portal while they wait in the waiting area. “There needs to be a strong advocate in each practice to make sure that these functionalities are implemented and used,” she adds. “Those practices with an advocate are the ones that will succeed.”

2. Secure messaging

This functionality allows physicians to send messages to—and receive messages from—patients in a secure manner, helping to improve engagement and communication. Practices must define how they’ll use secure messaging, including who will respond and what types of questions they’ll permit (e.g., fulfill appointment requests vs. answering clinical inquiries). “There are a small percentage of doctors who will want to answer their own messages, but there is a larger percentage of doctors who will want their staff to answer the emails and, if necessary, escalate to the provider,” says Onofri.

3. Patient health information capture

This functionality allows physicians to accept patient-generated health data into the EHR. For example, Onofri notes that the Kareo Clinical 2015 Edition EHR allows patients to record their health information at home to easily upload the information to their portal and transmit it securely to the physician for shared decision-making. The idea is that access to more comprehensive health data can help physicians prevent and manage disease—and it could be a game-changer in terms of population health management.

Start small when rolling out this functionality, she says. For instance, encourage patients with high blood pressure to upload their blood readings daily before engaging a second population (e.g., those with diabetes who upload their glucose levels).

4. Transitions of care

This functionality calls for interoperable documents that include key health data (e.g., name, date of birth, and medications) as well as standardized format for exchange. A transition of care summary provides critical information as patients transfer between different physicians at different health organizations or even distinct levels of care within the same organization.

“It’s not uncommon for our providers to send the referral right as they are completing the note with the patient in the room,” says Onofri. “This obviously speeds the care coordination for patients in terms of seeing another doctor.” The only caveat is that practices must compile a list of direct email addresses for physicians to whom patients are frequently referred, she adds.

5. Application programming interfaces (APIs)

“This is one of those requirements that is the foundation of things to come,” says Onofri. “It’s the first step toward interoperability.” API functionality will eventually allow patients to aggregate data from multiple sources in a web or mobile application of their choice.

Physicians who take the time to explore each of these 2015 certification functionalities may be more likely to improve outcomes and reap financial rewards under MACRA, says Onofri. “The improved functionality is there—is your practice taking advantage of it?”

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

How Can Small Practices Thrive with MACRA?

Posted on June 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live interview, you can watch the recorded conversation below:

2016 July - How Small Practices Can Thrive with MACRA - Headshots

On Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 3:30 PM ET (12:30 PM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with the Chief Medical Officers of both Modernizing Medicine and Kareo. All of healthcare has been hit with the MACRA legislation and many talking heads are saying that MACRA is going to be a challenge for small practices. In this discussion, we’ll talk about how small practices can thrive within the changes that MACRA provides.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, July 7, 2016 at 3:30 PM ET (12:30 PM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Plus, considering the length of the MACRA legislation, we welcome you to come and provide your insights into what the MACRA legislation means for small practices. We hope this will be an open discussion of the legislation and what impact it will have on small practices. Dr. Giannulli and Dr. Sherling are very well versed on the topic and will provide some tremendous insight into what to expect from MACRA.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

Finally, if you’d like to learn more about MACRA for small practices, I’ll be doing a detailed webinar on what we know about MACRA on July 13th at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT).

Small Practice Marketing Strategies Twitter Chat (#KareoChat)

Posted on April 12, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Health IT Marketing and PR Awards 2016

Last week we held the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference which is organized by Healthcare Scene. By all accounts, the conference ran well and the feedback I’ve gotten is that people really enjoyed the event and the healthcare marketing and PR community we’ve built. During the event, we held the HITMC Awards and Kareo won the award for Best Social Media Program. This is a well deserved honor since they put a lot of work into hosting the weekly #KareoChat.

Coming out of the conference, Kareo asked me if there were some topics from the conference that would work well for the #KareoChat audience of small practice physicians. After reviewing the sessions at the conference, I realized that there was a lot of lessons from the conference that could be applied to small practice marketing. In fact, so many of the topics could be a #KareoChat of their own. With that said, they asked if I’d host this week’s #KareoChat based on topics from the conference. So, I decided to pull together a potpourri of topics that applied well to small practices.

Kareo Chat - HITMC

Here’s a look at the topics for this week’s #KareoChat:

  1. When and why should a physician practice go through a rebranding? #KareoChat @HealthITMKTG
  2. How can you use your and your competitors’ online reviews (good and bad) to your benefit? #KareoChat @mdeiner
  3. Could small practices benefit from their own podcast? Is it worth it?  #KareoChat @GetSocialHealth @Resultant @jaredpiano
  4. How and when should small practices use visual content in their office? #KareoChat @csvishal2222
  5. How can the 4 communication preferences (Facts, Futures, Form, Feelings) help small physician practice marketing? #KareoChat @ChartCapture
  6. Where and how can we use the power of storytelling in small physician practice marketing? #KareoChat @ctrappe @stacygoebel

If you’d like to join us to discuss these topics, just follow the #KareoChat hashtag on Thursday, April 14th at Noon ET (9 AM PT). I expect it will be a really diverse and interesting chat across a wide variety of topics related to small practice marketing.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is an advertiser on one of the Healthcare Scene websites.

#MGMA15 Tweetup and Hosting This Week’s #KareoChat

Posted on October 7, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The busy fall conference season is upon us and the fun begins. Honestly, I love traveling to all of these events (other than that part about leaving my family). I seriously feel lucky to take part in so many amazing healthcare IT and EHR related events. I know that some people see them as work, but they are all learning and fun for me. I guess I’m weird like that.

MGMA 2015
Next up on my calendar is MGMA this weekend. MGMA 2015 is in Nashville which is exciting for me since I’ve never been to Nashville. I hear that Nashville is chock full of great healthcare IT companies. My schedule is already jam packed with meetings. I’m also excited to see what practice managers are going to say about the current state of healthcare. I’ll be evaluating them for EHR PTSD (Although maybe it will all be ICD-10 PTSD).

If you’re going to be at #MGMA15 or live in Nashville, the good people at Stericycle have put together a tweetup on Monday, October 12th from 5:00 PM – 6:00 PM at the Fuse Sports Club inside the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Covention Center. You can find all the details for the tweetup and RSVP here. Everyone’s welcome to attend the tweetup whether they’re attending MGMA 2015 or not. I hope to see many of you there.

Hosting the #KareoChat
Kareo Chat Hosting by John Lynn
I’ll be once again hosting this week’s #KareoChat where we’ll be discussing Ways to Grow and Market Your Practice. The chat happens every Thursday at 9 AM PT (Noon ET). I hope you’ll be able to join us tomorrow. Here’s the 6 questions we’ll be discussing:

  1. What are the most effective ways to market your practice today?
  2. Which new opportunities are you watching that you believe will eventually help grow your practice?
  3. What tools or technologies do you use to help grow and market your practice?
  4. How do you engage your existing patients in your marketing efforts?
  5. What sources do you look to to stay up to date on the latest marketing practices?
  6. In what ways can small practices compete against large health system competitors when marketing their practices?

This topic is becoming more and more important to small practices who are trying to figure out how to survive. I hope you’ll all join me on the Twitter chat and share your insights into the topic.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is an advertiser on Healthcare Scene.

EHR Apple Watch Integration

Posted on May 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve been writing about the coming of the Apple Watch for a long time here at Smart Phone healthcare. Remember when we use to call it the iWatch? I must admit that I hadn’t seen many really interesting healthcare applications on the iWatch. They all felt like retreads of things that were basically accomplished on people’s smart phone and weren’t that much better on the watch.

Today, I might have read about the first healthcare IT application on the Apple Watch that could provide value to healthcare. The announcement came from Kareo and here’s a list of key functionality that they’ve included in the Apple Watch from the Kareo EHR:

  • Secure messaging that allows the user to send, reply, and read messages via dictation. Messages can be sent to staff or patients using Kareo’s secure messaging system, improving overall patient engagement and practice communication.
  • An agenda that allows the provider to quickly reference their schedule and see the status of appointments checked-in, no show, late, checked out, etc., helping reduce wait times and improve practice efficiency.
  • Appointment reminders that can be sent five minutes before the next scheduled appointment. The notification subtly vibrates the watch, indicating that the doctor has an impending appointment.
  • Appointment information that is accessible within a notification or through the agenda, allowing the provider to review details such as the patient’s name, time of appointment, visit type, and reason for the visit.
  • “I’m Running Late” pre-set messages that allow the doctor inform other staff members when they are running behind and how much longer they expect to be. This improves practice communication and enables the front desk to give patients a more accurate wait time estimate.
  • Apple “Glances” that provide a quick overview of key practice metrics, including how many patients are scheduled throughout the day, how many patients are waiting to be seen, and which patients are currently waiting in an exam room.

EHR Apple Watch - Kareo

I’d like to see this in action and look forward to doing so the next time I see Kareo (possibly not until MGMA), but the features have some promise. I could see them being used pretty regularly. Especially the status updates on how many patients are checked in and how many are waiting. That’s really great information that is changing constantly throughout the day. The schedule for the day is great as well.

Kareo had previously announced some features for Google Glass. I liked that they were pushing the envelope, but it didn’t feel like something that doctors would grab onto. I think this Apple Watch implementation has a lot more legs to it. I’ll be interested to hear from Kareo doctors how it works in actual practice.

Full Disclosure: Kareo is a sponsor of one of the Healthcare Scene blogs.