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Massive Tech Shifts and Their Impact on Healthcare

Posted on January 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post brought to you by HP Matter. The content and opinions expressed below are that of Smart Phone Health Care.

We’re in the middle of one of the biggest shifts in technology that have ever occurred. While we’ve all heard the buzzwords big data, cloud, mobility, security, 3D Printing, wearables, and nanotechnology, those buzzwords each represent a major change that’s taking place in technology. Each of these technology shifts is going to have an enormous impact for good on all of society, but will literally transform healthcare as we know it today.

This transformation means that hospitals, researchers, doctors and patients each have a tremendous opportunity to benefit from these changes. The question isn’t whether these tech shifts will impact healthcare, but whether we’ll be part of that transformation.

While at International CES I saw the HP Matter booth and was able to check out the HP Matter magazine. If you’re interested in how these tech shifts are going to impact healthcare, you should check out the latest issue of HP Matter since it’s focused on healthcare. In this issue they look at 6 healthcare disruptions for 20203D printed prosthetics, and a great Q&A with Theresa Payton covering big data, security and regulation in healthcare. The 6 disruptions for 2020 are particularly interesting for me. Although, my guess is that many of those disruptions are already starting to happen now. By 2020 they’ll have become part of the normal fabric of healthcare.

HP Matter also put out a great video that talks about the future of technology and healthcare. Watching it gets me really excited about where healthcare can go:

I look forward to reading more of HP Matter as they cover the tech disruption happening in other industries. Looking at other industries is one of the best ways to re-frame what we see happening in healthcare. Also, it doesn’t hurt that if you Register for HP Matter, you have a chance to win an HP SlateBook x2 (an Ultrabook and tablet in one).  Weekly drawings will be conducted throughout January and February.

While we’ve been working for a long time to integrate technology with healthcare, in many ways we’re still just at the very beginning of what’s going to be possible. What current technological advancement in healthcare interest you?

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Wearables Explosion at CES 2015

Posted on January 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year I’ve been impressed by the growth of Digital Health at CES. However, this year has blown me away far more than any year before. In previous years, the health presence was so small that it was almost indistinguishable. In fact, it was so small that it was really easy for it to double and triple in size. Now that it’s gotten much bigger, it’s still doubling in size and the impact is even greater.

The space for Digital Health takes up a very large portion of the Sands Convention Center (Venetian Hotel) this year and that’s saying something for how large it’s really become. Plus, many of the booths were massive in scale. That’s not something we’d really seen at previous CES conferences in the Digital Health space.

Here’s one example of the massive iFit booth:
Wearable Fitness Booth at CES 2015

Yes, there’s basically a full stage for their booth with half a dozen people dancing and working out at their booth. Plus, after the dance performance, they are paying other models (I guess that’s what you’d call them) to work out on the equipment as well. It was quite the spectacle and the picture barely does it justice. (UPDATE: You can also check out this video of the Digital Health space at CES I did.)

In my initial CES Observations post on EMR and HIPAA, I commented on the number of new wearables, the beginning of ambient sensors with wearables, and the variety of new “jewelry” like wearables. Yes, there was a Swarovski jewelry booth right next to the Misfit booth.

On the other side of the equation were booth like the HP Matters booth:
HP Healthcare Booth at CES 2015

They had three images which talk about Healthcare in a Box (telemedicine), Data Analytics is Not Just a Buzzword, and Medical 3D Printing Comes of Age. I’m not sure how many people would have thought HP for any of these three areas.

I also found it really great that CES put the Health & Wellness, Digital Health and Fitness, Robotics, and 3D printing areas all right next to each other. No doubt there are a bunch of interesting robotic and 3D printing applications for healthcare.

While I’ve started to see a maturing of the devices and sensors at CES, I’m still waiting for a breakthrough company that does something powerful with all of this new found data. There are still a few edge cases where a Fitbit will help you lose weight by just encouraging you to reach a 10k step goal. Or the calorie counting app which makes you more aware of the food you’re eating. Those have their place in the current ecosystem, but that’s not really leveraging the data into a seamless change for people’s lives. In many ways, we needed all these sensors to mature to the point that we can innovate on top of all that data. Hopefully we’ll see more of it next year.

I did see one partial example of that this year. Fitbug has put together these Kiqplan programs. They’re essentially 12 week programs that try and address real problems that people are trying to solve: Slim + Trim, Beer Belly Blaster, Healthy Baby Bump, and Goodbye Baby Bump. In many ways this is just packaging, but I believe we need this type of packaging in order to attract people to using it. No doubt this is a simple first evolution, but I’d like to see where it goes.

No doubt wearables that relate to health and fitness have exploded at CES. However, I think we’re still just at the very beginning of seeing the amazing results from these wearable devices. The foundation is laid. Now we need to put up some walls and make it look nice.

The Future of Healthcare Mobility

Posted on August 21, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Dr. Joseph Kim, healthcare mobility expert, discusses how physicians’ are using Windows 8 and cloud technology to enhance workflow and interact with data on the go. Enjoy the video embedded below.

Managing EHR Change

Posted on August 20, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the things that EHR salespeople and EHR vendor websites like to proclaim is that their EHR can be implemented with no change. They use adjectives like “easy” and “simple” to describe their EHR implementations. Certainly EHR salespeople are trained to say things like “will adapt to any workflow” and “our system is so configurable you can change it however you like.”

Certainly this type of message rings well with doctors who are afraid of the changes that EHR will bring. Let me assure everyone who’s reading this that EHR requires change. This is true of every EHR vendor, for every specialty, and every size organization. Change and EHR go hand in hand. What we have to get over is thinking that change is bad. Change can often be good, if it’s done right.

HP recently put out a detailed whitepaper discussing “Four EHR Change-Management Mistakes (And How To Avoid Them)“. It’s one of the deepest looks at managing the change that comes with EHR that I’ve seen.

For those who don’t want to read the whole whitepaper, here are the four EHR change management mistakes:
1. Mismatched IT
2. Misplaced Resources
3. Missed Accountability
4. Mismanaged Logistics

The whitepaper also talks about the evolutionary role of IT in today’s medical practice. First, IT provides basic functionality. Next, IT adds some value. Finally, IT delivers significant benefit. I’ve seen this evolution first hand in many organizations. Each step of the process requires managing changes that lead to the eventual benefits. However, far too many people get stuck in the basic functionality and never make it to the significant benefits.

If I were to take one of the mistakes above to highlight why many miss out on significant benefits it would be Missed Accountability. At the core of this idea is having effective leadership. I’ve never seen an organization go through the EHR change effectively without strong leadership.

What do you or your organization do to manage the change required by EHR?

The HP ElitePad in Healthcare

Posted on August 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One thing I often forget when thinking about mobile computing in healthcare is that it’s not just the smart phone. Certainly the smart phone is incredibly powerful and has a strong place in the future of mobile health. However, it has its limitations. Often you just need more screen real estate to do what you need to in healthcare. This is particularly true on the enterprise healthcare side of the world compared to the consumer side.

This is what makes the Windows 8 and iPad tablets such an important part of the mobile health ecosystem. In fact, I think these tablets could do more to transform healthcare than their smaller smart phone counterparts. In fact, these tablets are more powerful than your smart phone in every single way except size.

I was reminded of the power of these tablets when I got the chance to use the HP ElitePad. It was my first time to really dig into a Windows 8 tablet and I was really interested to see how well it performed.
HP ElitePad 900_Front Center
My intrigue in the Windows 8 tablets had been originally sparked by Fred Holsten, CIO of Intermountain, who told me that in their hospital they didn’t allow Android tablets, but they did allow Window 8 tablets. They had real security concerns with the Android tablets, but felt confident in the security of the Window 8 tablet. Plus, he even was fond of the way that the Windows 8 tablet handled application management.

With this in mind, I wanted to see how the HP ElitePad felt in my hand. From a pure hardware perspective, it was well designed and as comfortable as any other tablet of similar screen size. I also had the HP ElitePad expansion jacket. I had mixed feelings about the expansion jacket. The tablet felt pretty bulky with it on, but I also felt the jacket seemed to be a pretty good protection for the device. In the end, I usually leaned towards using it with the expansion jacket off. Either way, the tablet definitely passed the look and feel test.

When I first started actually using the ElitePad, I wasn’t sure I was going to like the interface. It took me a little while to get use to the separation of apps from the more standard windows interface. Plus, I had to get use to swiping the side to pull up the menu. After using it a little bit I really grew to like the interface. It balanced the touch interface applications with the ability to run any regular windows applications quite well.

I could see how this balance of applications could work really well in healthcare. Many healthcare applications won’t be ported over to become a native tablet application. At least they won’t be moved over in the near future. So, there’s a need for devices that can handle both native and legacy applications. The app store was a bit disappointing, but I think that will continue to change over time. Plus, when it wasn’t in the app store, I could find a regular windows application that worked fine. Not to mention most of what I needed was also available in a web browser.

I do wish that there were some native external keyboard options for the device, but a simple USB keyboard worked just fine and are available in every shape and size. I didn’t try using voice recognition on the device, but it has a nice microphone and would have likely worked well. However, sometimes I just like a nice keyboard for data entry. I did use the built in camera and microphone on a Google Plus hangout and that worked perfectly. You can easily see a telemedicine visit happening with this device.

Overall the device worked really well for me. My only real complaint with the device was the charger connection. The charger doesn’t really snap into the hole and so it’s hard to know if the charger is connected properly or not. Plus, the charger can bend back and forth in the charging hole. I often had to check to make sure that the device was indeed charging. It usually was plugged in just fine, but it would be much nicer if the charging plug kind of locked into place so you knew it was connected properly.

Overall, I can definitely see a place for a Windows 8 tablet like the HP ElitePad in healthcare. I think this is particularly true in the hospital and practice environment where they want to use their existing security software to manage their computing devices. However, with the built in camera and microphone, I can also see a number of telemedicine applications really liking this device as well.

This post is sponsored by HP Healthcare, however opinions on products and services expressed here are my own. Disclosure per FTC’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

HP EHR Videos – EHR with Greenway & EHR with Quest Diagnostics

Posted on July 11, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

HP works with a number of EHR vendor partners. As part of those partnerships, HP has put out some really good videos of their EHR vendor partners. Here are a couple of the great HP videos talking about EHR with Greenway and EHR with Quest Diagnostics:

EHR with Greenway

EHR with Quest Diagnostics