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Is Lack of Mobile Health Interoperability Holding Us Back?

Posted on August 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today during the #HITChicks chat, there was a great discussion with two really amazing healthcare IT professionals, Patty Sheridan and Tamara StClaire, about the need for interoperability between mobile health apps. Here’s where it started:

Then, I pushed Tamara a bit to talk more about the subject:

What a strong and important statement from Tamara. I agree completely that we’ll miss out on so much of the value that mobile health apps can provide if we don’t find out a way for apps to share data. Interoperability of health data has been an extremely important topic. In fact, ONC has put out a 10 year plan on how to have interoperability in healthcare. However, in all of the things I’ve read about interoperability of healthcare data, they’re always talking about sharing healthcare data between healthcare providers and provider data with patients. I don’t remember anyone ever talking about sharing health data between mobile health apps. The closest I’ve seen is making the patient the HIE of one that gathers and shares data between apps.

If no ones talking about mobile health data sharing, will it ever happen? Since Tamara tweeted her comment. I’ve been trying to think of the pathway to achieve her vision of shared mobile health data between disparate applications. Will it happen? Who will make it a reality? What are your thoughts?

Tips for Women in the Medical Device Industry

Posted on March 4, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ll admit that I’m far from an expert on the challenges and inequities of women in the workforce. I think that everyone that knows me knows that I love working with women and I love strong empowered women. It’s what I hope my daughter will become one day. I’m proud that the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR conference was the first conference to be listed with over 50% female speakers.

I recently saw a stat that there were more CEO’s of the top 1500 companies named “John” (5.3%) than there are women CEOs (4.1%). That’s particularly disturbing since my name is John. It highlighted to me how solving the issues of gender inequality in the workplace is incredibly complex and challenging.

While I admit I don’t have all the answers, I was interested to hear these 5 suggestions for women from Kathryn Stecco, MD.

Women considering entrepreneurial initiatives in medical technology should follow these basic principles.

  1. Start with a big idea that solves a big problem: A new business must start with a powerful idea for a product or service that fills a real unmet need. Market is everything.
  2. Pursue a practical solution:  Focus on products that are safe, effective and easy to use for both physician and patient. If the product doesn’t make physicians’ lives easier, they won’t use it. The product must produce meaningful clinical data that speaks for itself.
  3. Build relationships – early – with clinicians: Medical entrepreneurs must be out in the field developing ties with physicians and getting their input early in the design process. No matter how well designed your product or how impressive your patents, physicians will have the last word on the usefulness of your product. They are vital to your success.
  4. Be prepared to shift gears:  Don’t fall into the trap of becoming so enamored of an idea or a product that you lose sight of its real likelihood of succeeding in the marketplace. You must have the flexibility to move on to something else when changes in the environment cause the ground to shift under your feet and your plans to be upended.
  5. Enjoy the ride!  Successful entrepreneurs make adversity the energy that fuels their creativity. They don’t learn their most valuable lessons in the classroom but in the trenches. They thrive on the long hours, the unpredictability, the rush that comes from building something important and valuable.

Maybe some of these ideas will help some women who are working in the medical device industry. It’s a small thing for sure, but maybe if we all do small things to improve the opportunities for women those small things will turn into something great.