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Are EHR Companies Difficult to Work With?

Posted on September 10, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

There is an entrenched myth that EHR companies are difficult to partner with – more interested in up-front partner fees and revenue sharing than actually collaborating with 3rd party companies. Two companies are working hard to be different.

Early in the spring, I had a lengthy conversation with a group of vendors at HIMSS18 about partnering with EHR companies. I had stopped at a booth and somehow we got onto the topic of collaborating with EHR companies as a way to accelerate product development and sales. The person I was speaking with was very frustrated at the lack of response from three of the larger EHR companies. I’m paraphrasing, but her statement was essentially this: “All they want is to charge me their 5K partnership fee and then take 10% of everything I sell to their customer base. It’s ridiculous.”

At that point, several representatives from surrounding booths joined in our conversation. All of them had similar frustrations and shared similar stories of being shunted to the partnership team – which in their opinion was just a sales team in disguise – where they were told about all the wonderful benefits they would receive in return for an upfront partnership fee. I’m sure many Healthcare Scene readers can identify with these vendors.

This conversation stuck with me and over the spring and summer, I decided to dive deeper into the world of EHR partnerships. I wanted to know if the myths were true and I wanted to see if there were any companies that were operating differently. Over the past several months at every conference I have attended, I have made it a point to find out as much as I could about the various partnership programs and spoke with dozens of vendors who were proudly displaying partnership badges on their booths.

The good news is that there are at least two companies working hard to build a thriving partner ecosystem. The bad news is that many EHR companies do not have a well-defined partnership strategy and many vendors do not feel they are getting full value for their participation in EHR ecosystems.

One of the key things I learned is that there is a distinct difference between working with an EHR company on interoperability vs being part of their partner ecosystem. There have been many articles over the past few years about the difficulty of extracting data from EHRs in order to share it with other organizations involved in the care for patients. Headlines like “How disparate EHR systems, lack of interoperability contribute to physician stress, burnout” are common.

Many of the EHR companies I spoke with separate their interoperability efforts from their partnership programs. The ability to share data with others, they said, was not related to how well/not well they worked with 3rd party companies. So while it may be true that EHR companies have a lot of work to do on interoperability, partnership for some is something a few companies are doing well.

One company is Allscripts.

After HIMSS18, I had the opportunity to drop in on the fourth annual Allscripts Developer Summit in Chicago. I honestly did not know what to expect and I was pleasantly surprised at how intimate the event was. The rooms were smaller and had people sitting at round tables listening to presenters and asking lots of questions. The level of interaction between the speakers and the developers at the tables was refreshing to see.

Most of the attendees at the Summit were developers and product managers from companies that were Allscripts partners. Most of the discussions in the sessions and in the hallways centered around the latest APIs and FHIR initiatives.

The Summit is part of Allscript’s Developer Program (ADP). Allscripts recently announced that its ADP partners have together processed more than 4 Billion API data exchange transactions since the company started tracking it in 2013. In the announcement Tina Joros, VP and General Manager, Open Business Unit at Allscripts had this to say:

“We are trying to create a new mentality of innovation for our clients so that they view innovation as a path to improve overall workflows and connect with patients. We have made our API platform easily accessible and cost-effective for developers to use so that they can develop and test their solutions. This includes the ability for developers to use our FHIR APIs to meet regulatory requirements for our shared clients at no cost.”

I had the chance to sit down with Joros during the Summit and she shared with me that Allscripts does more than just provide access to their APIs. “We help companies with sales and marketing as well,” said Joros. “We coach partners that are new to the space how to ‘talk healthcare’. We help them craft and tell their stories to their target buyers. We spend a lot of time on the phone and in the field with our ADP partners. Our goal is to reduce the risk for clients to adopt new technology.”

With more than 8,000 registered developers in ADP, I asked Joros why so many companies had joined. “One of the key differentiators is the ADP Integrator tier of our program; most competitors have programs that make it easier to sign up for the FHIR APIs but they also have a vetting process in place to review companies for partnership,” said Joros. “In our ADP Integrator tier, however, companies can sign up immediately to access all our FHIR and proprietary API functionality – there is no wait or vetting by Allscripts and no fee to get started. The pricing model is designed so that companies only pay Allscripts when they are ready to go to market via a testing fee and usage-based fee. The ease of signing up and no fee to get started are unique in the industry.”

One company that has been very successful at working with Allscripts is Relaymed – a company that makes connectivity software that sends point-of-care test results directly into EHRs. RelayMed has been part of ADP for four years and had nothing but good things to say about the program.

“Many EHR companies have rigid cultures that actually bias them against partnerships – the ‘not invented here’ syndrome,” commented Neil Farish, CEO of Relaymed who spoke with me over the phone. “Allscripts isn’t like that. They had a vision of an open and vibrant ecosystem. That vision is ingrained into their culture and there is support right from the top. It’s become part of their DNA. If anything, senior management at Allscripts has been paying even more attention to partners this year. They are present. They interact with us. Help from their marketing & sales teams has been easy to get and really welcomed.”

The team at Relaymed has been working with the Allscripts team to tighten and improve the level of integration between their two systems. As well, the companies together are looking at ways to expand the breadth of devices that connect to Allscripts through Relaymed.

Another company that has invested in their partnership program is Cerner.

Cerner takes a different approach when working with partners. Although they have a centralized team that helps on-board partners (legal, contracting, etc), the ongoing relationship with partners is handled directly by the team/department that works most closely with that partner. Sometimes that is the Cerner sales team. Often times it is the product team. It just depends on where most of the interactions will occur.

“No partnership looks the same,” John Gresham, Senior Vice President, DeviceWorks & Interoperability at Cerner told Healthcare Scene. “So we have to ask the key question – How does that partnership bring differentiated value to the customer? We will work with partners the way that works best for our customers. That may mean embedding someone else’s solution within our solutions, co-market their solution as part of a bundle or we may simply go-to-market together.”

It was surprising to learn that a company as large as Cerner did not have a cookie-cutter approach to partnering with 3rd parties. It would have been easy for them to put in a rigid framework but instead they adapt themselves to best suit the partnership. DellEMC, Kofax and Nuance were cited by Gresham as examples of Cerner partnerships that were flourishing.

“Customers want something seamless and not just in terms of Cerner being a systems integrator for them,” continued Gresham. “They want everything to be smooth and simple – buying it, contracting it, deploying it, integrating it and supporting it. Cerner is willing to do all those things, something that isn’t common in the EHR space.”

During our conversation, Gresham repeatedly referenced Cerner’s laser focus on delivering better patient care and better outcomes – and how that focus guided their partnership decisions. In fact, that is key to attracting the attention of an internal champion at Cerner: a clear line from the product or service being offered to customer or patient benefit.

That is exactly what happened with Goliath Technologies, a provider of IT operations software that enables IT Teams to anticipate, troubleshoot and prevent infrastructure performance issues. The team at Goliath had successfully implemented their solution at a Cerner customer. That customer spoke about their experience at a Cerner event and Jay Savaiano, Senior Director of Business Development at Cerner took notice.

“It was because of Jay and his vision that Goliath got into the program,” explained Thomas Charlton, Chairman and CEO at Goliath Technologies. “He was the first person we had a conversation with and from there everything went smoothly. He was with us every step of the way and we’re still working with Jay today. But it all started because we were able to demonstrate a clear positive impact on a Cerner customer.”

“Once Cerner decided that Goliath would benefit their customers, the process of formalizing the relationship was very straightforward and smooth,” continued Charlton. “They moved really fast. They have a fantastic team of people, very competent and focused. Everyone from contracting to legal to sales was great to work with.”

Because of the success, they have enjoyed with Cerner, Goliath has begun to put a lot of focus on their partnership with Cerner. They have begun working with Cerner developers to refine and tune their combined solutions and Goliath recently hired a new VP of Corporate Development who had left Cerner a few years ago, to help strengthen the relationship [side note the VP was referred to Charlton by people at Cerner]

“Cerner brings healthcare knowledge to Goliath,” said Charlton. “They know patient care and healthcare systems management. That deep understanding of healthcare has helped us with product development. Cerner has really helped to reshape our thinking on healthcare, patient care and Healthcare IT Operations management.”

*****

It is interesting to note that neither Relaymed or Goliath were put forward by Allscripts or Cerner respectively as example partners to speak with. Both Relaymed and Goliath were referred to me by different people who are not affiliated with either EHR company.

So if you are a software provider that is looking to partner with an EHR company what can you do to attract their attention? All four individuals I spoke with offered sage advice.

Neil Farish (Relaymed): “Avoid the transactional models of partnership where it is just an exchange of $$$. Look to the value that you as a partner are getting, the value the EHR company is getting and the value you can provide together to their end-customers. If there is value all around then the fees should be dwarfed by the value. If not, then you seriously have to rethink that potential partnership.”

Thomas Charlton (Goliath): “Have a very clear understanding of how your product or service helps deliver better care to patients. Can you show a direct line to customer or patient benefit? If you can’t then you need to figure that out before approaching an EHR company looking for a partnership. Also, joint customers are important. The more joint customers you have the more momentum you will get behind the initiative.”

John Gresham (Cerner): “The key to making partnerships work is mutual respect. That’s the starting point. Next comes a key question – do you have a ‘what’s best for customers’ mindset. If you have that then we have a foundation for conversation. I would strongly encourage companies to build solutions for the highest possible reliability, scalability and security.  Cerner customers expect that. Oh, and you have to have proof points to back that up.”

Tina Joros (Allscripts): “Be persistent. Come talk to us at conferences. Connect with us online. I would encourage any company signed up for the program and does not feel like it is providing value, to speak with a member of our team and let us know.  In some cases, we can find a tier that is a better fit for the company or make introductions to other associates at Allscripts, so additional areas of the business can evaluate their solution.”

Myth busted.

Health IT Leaders Fear Insider Security Threats More Than Cyberattacks

Posted on June 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A recently-published survey suggests that while most health IT security leaders feel confident they can handle external attacks, they worry about insider threats.

Cybersecurity vendor Imperva spoke with 102 health IT professionals at the recent HIMSS show to find out what their most pressing security concerns were and how prepared they were to address them.

The survey found that 73% of organizations had a senior information security leader such as a CISO in place. Another 14% were hoping to hire one within the next 12 months. Only 14% said they didn’t have a senior infosec pro in place and weren’t looking to hire.

Given how many organizations have or plan to have a security professional in place, it’s not surprising to read that 93% of respondents were either “very concerned” or “concerned” about a cyberattack affecting their organization. The type of cyberattacks that concerned them most included ransomware (32%), insider threats (25%), comprised applications (19%) and DDoS attacks (13%). (Eleven percent of responses fell into the “other” category.)

Despite their concerns, however, the tech pros felt they were prepared for most of these threats, with 52% that they were “very confident” or had “above average” confidence they could handle any attack, along with 32% stating that their defenses were “adequate.”  Just 9% said that their cybersecurity approach needed work, followed by 6% reporting that their defenses needed to be rebuilt.

Thirty-eight percent of the health IT pros said they’d been hit with a cyberattack during the past year, with another 4% reporting having been attacked more than a year ago.

Given the prevalence of cyberthreats, three-quarters of respondents said they had a cybersecurity incident response plan in place, with another 12% saying they planned to develop one during the next 12 months. Only 14% didn’t have a plan nor was creating one on their radar.

When it came to external threats, on the other hand, respondents seemed to be warier and less prepared. They were most worried about careless users (51%), compromised users (25%) and malicious users (24%).

Their concerns seem to be compounded by a sense that insider threats can be hard to detect. Catching insiders was difficult for a number of reasons, including having a large number of employees, contractors and business partners with access to their network (24%), more company assets on the network or in the cloud than previously (24%), lack of staff to analyze permissions data on employee access (25%) and a lack of tools to monitor insider activities (27%).

The respondents said the most time-consuming tasks involved in investigating/responding to insider threats included collecting information from diverse security tools (32%), followed by tuning security tools (26%), forensics or incident analysis (24%) and managing too many security alerts (17%).

#HIMSS18: Oh The Humanity

Posted on April 2, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sean Erreger, LCSW or @StuckonSW as some of you may know him.

It was a privilege to attend the 2018 HIMSS global conference this year. Having blogged and tweeted about Health IT for a couple of years, it was great to finally live it. By taking a deep dive, attending presentations, demoing products, and networking; I came to a greater understanding of how Health IT tackles the problems I hope to solve. From a social work perspective, I continue to be fascinated with the idea that technology can facilitate change.  Getting lost in artificial intelligence, machine learning, natural language processing, and predictive analytics was easy. It was exciting to learn the landscape of solutions, amount of automation, and workflow management possible. As a care manager, I believe these tools can be incredibly impactful.

However, despite all the technology and solutions, came the reminder that Health IT is a human process. There were two presentations that argued that we can’t divorce the humanity from health information technology process.  First was on the value of behavioral science and secondly a presentation on provider burnout and physician suicide.

The Value Of Behavioral Science

This was a panel presentation and discussion moderated by Dr. Amy Bucher of Mad*Pow including Dr. Heather Cole-Lewis of Johnson and Johnson, Dr. David Ahern of the FCC, and Dr. John Torous of Harvard Medical school. All experts were a part of projects related to Personal Connected Health Alliance. They asked attendees to consider the following challenges and how behavior science play a role…

Questions like how do we measure outcome and defining what “engagement” look like are key to how we build Health IT.  Yes, things like apps and wearables are cool but how do we measure their success. This can often be a challenge. It often feels like health IT is trying to outdo each other about who is coming up with the coolest piece of technology. However, when we get down to the nuts and bolts and start to measure engagement in technology, we might not like the results…

This presentation reminded me that technology is not often enough. Valuing the importance of “meeting people where they are”, may not include technology at all. We have to challenge ourselves to look ethically at the evidence and ensure that digital health is something a patient may or may not want.

Technology as a Solution to Physician Burnout and Suicide

It was reassuring to know even before I got to HIMSS that suicide prevention was going to be part of the conversation. Janae Sharpe and Melissa McCool presented on physician suicide and tools to potentially prevent it. This presents another human aspect of Health IT, the clinicians that use them. The facts about physician suicide are hard to ignore…

As someone who has done presentations about burnout and secondary trauma, I am acutely aware of how stressful clinical care can be.  It is unclear whether technology is a cause but it is certainly a factor, even in physician suicide. The research on this complex, but to blame the paperwork demands for burnout and physician suicide is tricky. To attribute a cause to things is always a challenge but my take away is that the Health IT community might be part of the problem but the presenters made a compelling case that it should be part of the solution. That not only reducing clicks and improving workflow is needed but providing support is critical.

They talked about the need to measure “burnout” and see how the Health IT community can design technology to support those at risk.  They have created a scale called the Sharp Index to try to measure physician burnout and also build technology to provide support. This seems to be striving for that right mix between measurement in the hopes of making space for human processes in a complex technology space.

Cooking The Mix Between Tech and Human Care

These presentations leave Health IT with many questions. Apps to provide a means of clinical care exist but are they working? How can we tell we are getting digital health right? How can we tell if technology is making a difference in patients’ lives? How do we define “success” of an app? Is technology having a negative impact on clinical care and clinicians themselves? If so, how do we measure that?

These questions force us to take an intentional look at how we measure outcomes but more importantly how we define them. Both presentations stressed the multi-disciplinary nature of health information technology development.  That no matter what the technology, you need to ask what problem does it solve and for who? As we consider building out AI and other automation we need to keep the humanity in healthcare.  So we can better care for ourselves as providers and ask what patients need in a human centered manner.

For a deeper dive into each presentation, I have created twitter recaps of both the Behavioral Science Panel and the presentation on Physician Suicide.

About Sean Erreger
Sean is Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York. He is interested in technology and how it is facilitating change in a variety of areas. Within Health IT is interested in how it can include mental health, substance abuse, and information about social determinants. He can be found at his blog www.stuckonsocialwork.com.

Healthcare Dashboards, Data, and FHIR

Posted on March 30, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in a dashboard society. We love our dashboards! We have mechanisms to track, analyze, and display all sorts of data at our fingertips any time of the day or night and everywhere we turn. We like it that way! Data is knowledge. Data is power. Data drives decisions. Data is king.

But what about healthcare data? Specifically, what about YOUR healthcare data? Is it all available in one place where you can easily access it, analyze it, and make decisions about your health? Chances are, it’s not. Most likely, it’s locked up inside various EHRs and many tethered (read: connected to the provider, not shareable to other providers) patient portals you received access to when you visited your doctors for various appointments. In some cases, the information that is there might not be correct. In other cases, there might not be much data there at all.

How are you supposed to act as an informed patient or caregiver when you don’t have your data or accurate data for those you are caring for? When health information is spread across multiple portals and the onus is on you to remember every login and password and what data is where for each of these portals, are you really using them effectively? Do you want to use them? It’s not very easy to connect the dots when the dots can’t be located because they’re in different places in varying degrees of completeness.

How do we fix this? What steps need to be taken? Aggregating our health information isn’t just collecting the raw data and calling it a complete record. It’s more than being able to send files back and forth. It’s critical to get your data right, at the core, as part of your platform. That’s what lets you build useful services, like a patient dashboard, or a provider EHR, or a payer analytics capability. A modern data model that represents your health information as a longitudinal patient record is key.

Many IT companies have realized HL7 FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) is the preferred way to get there and are exploring its uses for interoperability. These companies have started using FHIR to map health information from their current data models to FHIR in order to allow information exchange.

This is just the beginning, though. If you want robust records that support models of the future, you need a powerful, coherent data model, like FHIR, as your internal data model, too.  Then take it a step further and use technologies similar to those used by other enterprise scale systems like Netflix and LinkedIn, to give patients and caregivers highly available, scalable, and responsive tools just like their other consumer-facing applications. Solutions that are built on legacy systems can’t scale in this way and offer these benefits.

Our current healthcare IT environment hasn’t made it easy for patients to aggregate their health information or aggregated it for them. If we want to meet the needs of today and tomorrow’s patients and caregivers, we need patient-centric systems designed to make it easy to gather health information from all sources – doctors, hospitals, laboratories, HIEs, and personal health devices and smartphones.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Hopes for Big Impact from Validic: Making Use of Consumer Device Data

Posted on March 20, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Validic, a company that provides solutions in data connectivity to health care organizations, came to HIMMS this year with a new platform called Impact that takes a big step toward turning raw data into actionable alerts. I talked to Brian Carter, senior vice president of product at Validic, about the key contributions of Impact.

Routinely, I find companies that allow health-related monitoring in the home. Each one has a solution it’s marketing to doctors: a solution reminding patients to take their meds, monitoring vital signs for diabetes, monitoring vital signs for congestive heart failure, or something else fairly specific. These are usually integrated solutions that provide their own devices. The achievement of Validic, built through years of painstakingly learning the details of almost 400 different devices and how to extract their data, is to give the provider control over which device to use. Now a provider can contract with some application developer to create a monitoring solution for diabetes or whatever the provider is tracking, and then choose a device based on cost, quality, and suitability.

Validic’s Impact platform actually does many of the things that a third-party monitoring solution can do. But rather than trying to become a full solutions provider for such things as hospital readmissions, Validic augments existing care management systems by integrating its platform directly into the clinical workflow. With Impact, clinicians can draw conclusions directly from the data they collect to generate intelligent alerts.

For instance, a doctor can request that Impact sample data from a sensor at certain intervals and define a threshold (such as blood sugar levels) at which Impact contacts the doctor. Carter defines this service more as descriptive analytics than predictive analytics. However, Validic plans to increase the sophistication of its analysis to move more toward predictive analytics. Thus, they hope in the future not just to report when blood sugar hits a dangerous threshold, but to analyze a patient’s data over time and compare it to other patients to predict if and when his blood sugar will rise. They also hope to track the all too common tendency to abandon the use of consumer devices, and predict when a patient is likely to do so, allowing the doctor to intervene and offer encouragement to keep using the device.

Validic has evolved far beyond its original mission of connecting devices to health care providers and wellness organizations. This mission is still important, because device manufacturers are slow to adopt standards that would make such connections trivial to implement. Most devices still offer proprietary APIs, and even if they all settled on something such as FHIR, Carter says that the task of connecting each device would still require manual programming effort. “Instead of setting up connections to ten different devices, a hospital can connect to Validic once and get access to all ten.”

However, interconnection is slowly progressing, so Validic needs to move up the value chain. Furthermore, clinicians are slow to use the valuable information that devices in the home can offer, because they produce a flood of data that is hard to interpret. With Impact, they can derive some immediate benefit from device data, as the critical information is elevated above the noise while still being integrated into their health records. They can contract further with other application developers to run analytical services and integrate with their health records.

The Human Side of Healthcare Interactions

Posted on March 19, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Bennight, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

The week after HIMSS is certainly a rest and reflect (and catch up) time period. So much information is crammed into five short days that hopefully fuel innovation and change in our industry for the next year. We hear a lot of buzzwords during HIMSS, and as marketers in general. This year my biggest area of post-HIMSS reflection is on the human side of healthcare. Often, as health IT professionals, we can be so enamored with the techie side of things that we lose sight of what adding more automation does to our daily interactions.

The digital revolution has certainly made life easier. We can connect online, schedule an appointment, Uber to our destination, order groceries online, and pick them up on our way home with limited interactions with any real human. While the convenience for many far outweighs any downside, the digital world is causing its own health concern: loneliness.

Research by Holt-Lunstad found that “weak social connections carry a health risk that is more harmful than not exercising, twice as harmful as obesity, and is comparable to smoking 15 cigarettes a day or being an alcoholic.” But the digitization of our lives is reducing the amount of human interaction and our reasons to connect in real life. I keep hearing the phrase “we are more connected than ever, but we are feeling more alone”.  How do we avoid feeding another health issue, such as depression, while making healthcare more accessible, cost-effective, and convenient?

In healthcare communications, I want both technological convenience and warm, caring human interaction depending on what my need is at a given moment. If I need to schedule an appointment, I’d better have the option to schedule online. But in the middle of the night, when my child has a 104F fever and I call my doctor, I want a real person to talk and ask questions to, who will listen to the state my child is in and make the best recommendation for their health.

I had the privilege of discussing this balance of human and tech in a meet up at HIMSS last week. We learned that my colleague and friend learned the gender of her baby via a portal while waiting patiently for the doctor’s office to call. This is pushing the line of being ok in my opinion. But what if it was something worse, such as a cancer diagnosis or something equally scary? Is that ok for you? Wouldn’t you prefer and need someone to guide you through the result and talk about next steps?

As we add even more channels to communicate between health facility and patient, we need to take a look at the patient interaction lifecycle and personalize it to their needs. We should address the areas where automation might move faster than the human connections we initiate to ensure we are always in step with our tools and technology. Healthcare relationships rely on confidence and loyalty, and these things aren’t so easily built into an app. Online interactions will never replace the human, day-to-day banter and touch we all need. But I believe that technology can create efficiency that allows my doctor to spend more quality time with me during my visits and better engage me in my health.

So the question stands: how do you think the healthcare industry can find the right tech and human balance?

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Seven Types of HIMSS18 Attendees: An Exhibitor’s Perspective

Posted on March 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The HIMSSanity is over and everyone’s departed Las Vegas and headed for home (or SXSW). This year, my company was an exhibitor in Hall G at HIMSS. Our booth was on the main aisle, or “the thoroughfare” as those of us in the booth liked to call it. As such, I noticed some trends in the types of booth visits we encountered this year during HIMSS. These visits can be summed up into seven different types.

Integration on the Brain. “I need something to connect my disparate systems together.” Whether it’s EHR-to-EHR, EHR-to-other systems, PHR-to-EHR, or many Health IT combinations, there was no shortage of requests at HIMSS for a system or platform to make these connections happen more seamlessly. Inquiries about integration and connecting various technologies came up more frequently at our booth than any other topic at the show. These conversations were great for MedicaSoft because we can help them solve integration problems.

Partnership Hustle. “I make APIs, products, or provide services to complement your software offering. I think we’d make great partners.” HIMSS is certainly a place to find synergies and begin conversations for potential win-win situations for companies who want to partner together and go to market. Sometimes these meetings are the start of a perfect “meet cute.” Other times, they fall short. Either way, there are lots of folks out there with a wide variety of products and services making their rounds and searching for perfect business partners.

Swag Gatherer. “I came here for the swag.” You know this person. This person has no desire to interact with you. They’re not sure what your company does and many times they don’t care to ask. This person wants to collect as much free stuff at the conference as possible. Sometimes they are annoyed when you don’t have a giveaway. You know you’ve encountered a swag gatherer by their refusal to make eye contact and how fast they exit your booth once they’ve snatched up whatever swag or tchotchke you have to offer.

IT Spy. “I must find out what the competition is doing right now, let me pretend I’m in the market for IT products and booth hop.” We’ve all seen it. We know when it’s happening. It can be hilarious when the spying company tries to act like they are NOT doing this. It’s pretty obvious. I’m on to you. My only request? Be nice about it. We’ll show you what we have. You don’t have to be obnoxious or play dumb. We are happy to share.

Things You Don’t Need. “You really need our product or service even if you think you don’t need our product or service.” Everyone has this happen at one point or another. Someone comes by and really wants to sell you something you don’t need. Sometimes they politely go on their way. Other times they linger on, refusing to acknowledge that you don’t need their product or service. Sometimes being upfront doesn’t help and they continue to launch into their sales pitch anyway. You have to give these folks credit, they really are trying to sell.

Neighborhood Friendly Booth Staff or First-time HIMSS-goer. “I just thought I’d say hello.” This could be neighboring booth staff coming over to say hello. It could also be an exhibitor or attendee who’s there for the first time. In either case, these are friendly people who want to ask questions. They are getting their bearings for the show and trying to learn as much as possible. Many times they ask for advice or directions.

Match Made in Heaven. “We’re looking to buy or replace our patient portal, PHR, EHR, or integration platform.” The crème de la crème of conference attendees. This person has done their research. They know what they want and what they want is what you offer! These types of meetings leave you jazzed for the rest of the conference and eager for post-conference follow-up. This type of conference attendee actually answers your emails and phone calls when you follow-up because they have a genuine interest in what you do and how you can help them solve their IT problems or challenges.

HIMSS18 exhibitors and attendees, what other types of booth attendees did you see this year at the show?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

A Look Back at #HIMSS18 – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on March 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/16 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from Healthcare Scene.

If you’re like me, you’ve come back from the HIMSS Annual Conference in Las Vegas and you’re experiencing what some people call the #HIMSSHaze or the #HIMSSHangover. It’s a bit of an overwhelming experience to attend a conference with 44k people and 1350 vendors. Plus, add in the lights and stimulus of Las Vegas and it’s no surprise why we all head home a little tired.

Hopefully you’re back home recovering from the event. This week’s chat we’ll do a kind of post-mortem on the event where we share our insights and experiences. What did we see? What didn’t we see? Were there any game changing announcements?

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we wrap up #HIMSS18 with the following questions:

T1: How would you describe your #HIMSS18 experience? Big Win? Bust? Meh? and why? #HITsm

T2: What topics were trending at #HIMSS18 and what does it mean for healthcare? #HITsm

T3: What did you wish you’d seen at #HIMSS18 but didn’t find it? Should HIMSS work to have it next year? #HITsm

T4: Most profound thing you heard or saw at #HIMSS18? #HITsm

T5: Share your favorite piece of content coming out of #HIMSS18 and why you found it valuable. #HITsm

Bonus: What’s next on your conference agenda for 2018 after #HIMSS18? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Strong Showing from Non-healthcare Technology Vendors on #HIMSS18 Exhibit Floor

Posted on March 9, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

The #HIMSS18 exhibit hall was proof of the growing trend of non-traditional healthcare companies entering the market. Along every aisle there were booths from consumer and B2B brands that are familiar outside the context of healthcare. There were mega-brands like:

  • Amazon
  • Cisco
  • Google
  • Microsoft
  • Oracle
  • Verizon
  • Salesforce

But it wasn’t just tech giants that made an appearance at #HIMSS18. Sprinkled throughout the exhibit hall were other organizations who were taking their products and expertise, honed in other industries and applying them to healthcare:

  • Zebra Technologies
  • Windstream
  • Pegasystems
  • Liaison Technologies
  • Microstrategies
  • Panasonic
  • OpenText

I found this second group of companies fascinating.

In recent weeks we have seen big announcement from companies like Apple and Amazon about their new healthcare initiatives. On a #hcldr tweetchat early last month, we solicited opinions in collaboration with HIMSS on whether the arrival of these companies was ultimately going to be good or bad for healthcare. The community’s reaction was one of “cautious exuberance”.

On one hand, many were very excited about the potential for these companies to spur innovation and improve user (aka patient) experiences. On the other hand many people brought forward concerns about how viable these companies could scale their healthcare initiatives.

Consider Amazon and Apple’s recent announcements. Both are working toward creating a private network of clinics that are available to staff that bypasses the traditional provider-payer ecosystem. The goal is to drive down healthcare costs for employees while simultaneously improving workforce efficiency. But both these tech giants have highly-skilled, highly-educated workforces and they both operate in a hyper-competitive talent market where health benefits could be a deciding factor. I’m not sure how this might scale to companies where wages are lower and competition is not as fierce. Would there be the same incentive?

It will be interesting to see how these do-it-yourself approaches work out in the long term. But what has me more excited are the non-traditional healthcare companies that are bringing their products and expertise from other industries to healthcare. Companies like Zebra Technologies (retail & transportation), Windstream (infrastructure & communications) and Pegasystms (financial technology) are quietly using their non-healthcare solutions to improve healthcare TODAY. This practical approach is exciting to see because of the immediate benefit to healthcare and because the solutions are proven.

Their outside-in perspective coupled with their significant resources is something that I will be watching closely in the months following HIMSS18.

*Windstream Enterprises, Pegasystems and Liaison Technologies are sponsors of Healthcare Scene.

Five Not-so-typical meetings at #HIMSS18

Posted on March 7, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

As the first day of the #HIMSS18 exhibit hall dawned, I had mentally prepared myself for a series of meetings where we would be discussing the product updates, client signings and releases of new thought-leadership content. Fortunately, the universe decided to throw a curveball and I ended up with no fewer than five meetings that were completely different than what I expected.

Meeting 1 – Nuance

I had the opportunity to sit down with Nuance at #HIMSS18. I wrote an earlier post about their #AI Marketplace and I fully expected to listen to an update on that effort plus learn details about the company’s recent announcement of a multi-year collaboration with Partners Healthcare. They surprised me by speaking instead about the importance of their work in the area of incidental findings.

Brenda Hodge, Chief Marketing Officer of Nuance Healthcare spoke passionately about the work that Nuance is doing to help ensure incidental findings are brought to the attention of primary care physicians. Through their AI prioritization algorithms and natural-language-processing capabilities, Nuance has plans to capture this potentially vital imaging information and highlight it so that the right clinical interventions can be applied sooner.

It was the fervor and fire with which Hodge spoke that was the not-so-typical part of our meeting. It was fun to share that moment with a kindred spirit, passionate about improving healthcare.

Meeting 2 – Voalte

The good folks at Voalte provided me the opportunity to do something I have never done at HIMSS – moderate a meetup. We assembled a fantastic group of panelist: @ShahidnShah @innonurse @drandrew76 and Angela Kauffman (from @Voalte) had a lively discussion about Physician Communications. The meetup was even better than I expected.

The conversation flowed easily. Online engagement was high. A good sized crowd gathered to listen. It was a fantastic way to start the day. We captured the meetup on video so watch for clips from the meetup on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel once we recover from #HIMSSanity.

Meeting 3 – TigerConnect (Formerly Known as TigerText)

I stopped by for a quick chat with the team at TigerConnect – the company formally known as TigerText – to talk about their recent rebrand. This meeting was atypical of ones I have had at HIMSS because it was solely focused on their marketing rather than on their products. It was refreshing to have the chance to get a behind-the-scenes view of their recent rebranding initiative.

TigerText is a pioneer in the field of secure communications in hospitals and their brand had become well-established. Unfortunately the “Text” portion of their name was becoming a limitation as their company expanded into adjacent spaces and extended their platform’s capabilities. In just a few months, they made the decision to rebrand and executed it in time for #HIMSS18.

I’ll be writing a more in-depth piece on this after HIMSS, but felt it was worth mentioning because I have never had this type of frank, honest marketing conversation at HIMSS before.

Meeting 4 – Lenovo Health

I stopped by the Lenovo Health booth to see what new things were happening – especially since I had the chance to attend their HealthIT Think Tank event last year. I came for news and I ended up taking a selfie with a custom-made sign. It was energizing to just do something fun in their booth. It was 10 minutes of being creative and capturing a moment in their space. You can see how big our smiles are in the pictures we took.

Meeting 5 – Cerner

The team at Cerner reached out a few days ago and asked to get together. By pure chance, they suggested a time that had recently freed up on my calendar (one of the few open spots I had). I honestly did not read the request carefully before agreeing to it. I thought I was going to be part of a press briefing that was being broadcast. It turned out that the Cerner team wanted to me to be part of their onsite podcast.

We ended up have a wonderful conversation about Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall. It was a free-flowing discussion that I was not expecting. You can listen to the podcast here.

It was so much fun that we continued chatting for 20min after we wrapped the recording. At the end I had the opportunity to officially welcome the Cerner podcasting/social media/marketing crew to #pinksocks. Like the Lenovo Health meeting earlier, it was a rare chance to create a lasting memory. I will not soon forget that #pinksocks gifting – the enthusiasm, surprise and good feeling was just incredible.

Day 1 takeaway – small moments, lasting memories

For me, Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall was all about creating lasting memories from small moments. It wasn’t about the big splashy announcements, but the open/honest conversation. As I reflect on the day, I can’t help but smile at the how the stars aligned to give me a day at HIMSS that is the ideal we strive for in healthcare. Imagine if all across the healthcare ecosystem, clinicians were able to have small moments with patients that were open, honest, free-flowing as well as conversational and where both left the encounter feeling energized.

We need more days like this.