Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

The Need for an Improved Patient Focus and Patient Experience in Healthcare

Posted on July 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had a chance to talk with Colin Hung from Stericycle, a real thought leader in the world of healthcare IT and patient engagement. You can watch our discussion below where we talk about the lack of patients at healthcare IT conferences and a healthcare IT vendor perspective around interaction with patients. Plus, we dive into the concept of patient experience and patient’s desire to communicate and interact with their physician. We also talk about self-scheduling appointments in healthcare and involving patients in product design.

Thanks to Colin for sharing a bit about the benefits of involving more patients in healthcare IT. I’m sure we could have talked for a few more hours about this topic.

The Burnt Out Healthcare IT Industry – Time for a Reset

Posted on March 14, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Colin Hung recently posted that HIMSS 2016 didn’t really have a theme and that this was a good thing. I think that’s a fair assessment. There wasn’t any one topic or initiative that was grabbing everyone’s attention. However, I would argue that there was a theme coming out of HIMSS 2016:

The Healthcare IT industry is tired and burnt out.

You know the feeling when you’re burnt out. You can’t think about any more topics. You can’t add anything new to your plate. You just need some time to re-energize yourself before you start taking on new initiatives. You need some time to reset.

While at HIMSS I heard and read a few people mention that the healthcare IT world feels a bit like it did after the craziness of Y2K. They described the feeling at HIMSS after Y2K similar to what it was like at HIMSS 2016.

I’ll admit that I was off in Italy without technology for Y2K, so I can’t compare it first hand, but the comparison makes a lot of sense. I did see how companies and organizations were trying to prepare for Y2K. After putting so much focus and worry on a project for an extended period, you need some down time to reset your priorities.

I see the same happening today. However, it isn’t just one thing that’s tied up healthcare executives. Meaningful use has been all consuming for many organizations. ICD-10 took up a whole lot of focus and training to ensure that everything went smoothly with that transition. HIPAA Omnibus and this wave of breaches along with the HIPAA Security Risk assessment requirements has caused organizations to focus on security. All of that has consumed healthcare executives focus the past couple years. It’s definitely time for a well deserved reset.

However, it’s not just the leaders that need a reset. The entire organization needs a reset and some space to relax after executing so many major projects at once (often in a very compressed time frame).

The problem is that there won’t be much time to sit back and relax. Most EHR implementations still need a lot of work. Doctors are getting more and more frustrated with their EHR and we’re going to need to do something about it before it adds to the already burnt out doctors. However, looking back I think we’ll see HIMSS 2016 as the year of the Healthcare IT reset. I don’t think that’s a bad thing. In fact, I think it’s necessary.

What’s the Right Approach to Data Analytics in an ACO Shared Savings Program?

Posted on March 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the HIMSS 2016 Annual conference, Shahid Shah from Netspective Media had a chance to talk with Souvik Das, Principal Data Scientist and Big Data Architect at Sutter Health at the SAP booth to talk about Souvik’s healthcare analytics ACO work at Sutter Health.

In this video Shahid and Souvik talk about how a healthcare organization should prioritize their healthcare analytics efforts. They also talk about the need to work on analytics that improve patient care, increase revenue, and increase efficiency. Plus, they highlight how it’s not enough to focus on the technical aspects of your analytics, but you need to also focus on the organizational aspects. Souvik also highlights the key concept that “If you’re going to fail, fail small and fail early.” Finally he talks about the need to have buy in at the executive level or the project will fail.

If you’re working on healthcare analytics or are part of an ACO Shared Savings program, you’ll enjoy this video interview of Souvik Das from HIMSS 2016:

SAP is uniquely positioned to help advance personalized medicine and healthcare analytics. The SAP Foundation for Health is built on the SAP Hana platform which provides scalable cloud analytics solutions across the spectrum of healthcare including ACO Shared Savings Programs. SAP is a sponsor of Influential Networks of which Healthcare Scene is a member.

The Sick State of Healthcare Data Breaches Infographic

Posted on March 9, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

One of the topics discussed at HIMSS 2016 last week is the number of healthcare data breaches that have happened recently. Most people predicted that it was likely to get worse. I agree with them. It’s amazing how many healthcare organizations are playing the “ignorance is bliss” card when it comes to these breaches.

This infographic from LightCyber should put a little perspective on the quantity and impact of all these health care data breaches. If I were the leader of a healthcare organization, I’d be making this one of my top priorities.

The Sick State of Healthcare Data Breaches Infographic

HIMSS 2016 Moved from Mobility to Devices

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Thinking back on a week at the HIMSS Annual Conference, I think it’s fair to say that the industry has moved beyond the smart phone and moved on to new devices. That’s not to say that mobile doesn’t matter, but mobility has just become a feature of most software the same way we talk about a cloud application. No one buys cloud, but they might look at whether the application is a cloud application. The same is true for mobility. You don’t buy mobility, but you might want to know if the application is available on mobile devices.

With that said, there are still many that use the term mobile health to describe any devices that could be used in your health. That’s a pretty broad definition since it could include apps on your smartphone, the watch on your wrist, the Fitbit in your pocket, or some other sort of sensor attached to your body in some way. This leaves off ingestibles and implantables which I guess could apply to this broad definition of mobile health as well.

I believe 2016 was a breakout year for consumer health device companies at HIMSS. While in previous years I might see a number of these consumer health device companies at CES, very few of them really had any presence at HIMSS. HIMSS 2016 had a lot of these device manufacturers with much larger presences. This includes large companies like Philips (who killed it on the #HIMSS16 hashtag) and Qualcomm (of course they acquired CapsuleTech which has always had a good presence at HIMSS), but also a large smattering of smaller device companies scattered throughout the HIMSS 2016 exhibit hall floor.

I can’t say that I saw anything new from these companies, but HIMSS isn’t really the place for them to launch new products. Most of these companies save product launches for other events like CES or Mobile World Congress. Instead, their presence at HIMSS shows an interesting evolution in the journey of these generally consumer focused health devices. HIMSS is about the healthcare enterprise. What’s still not clear to me is how many of these consumer health devices can find a foothold in the enterprise healthcare world. However, it’s notable that so many are trying.

No Single Theme Dominated HIMSS16 and That’s Exciting!

Posted on March 8, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

HIMSS 2016 Attendance Numbers

Last week, over 41,000 people descended on Las Vegas for the annual HIMSS conference, #HIMSS16. Attendance was down slightly compared to the previous year, but it sure didn’t feel like it in the crowded hallways and aisles in the Sands Expo Center.

I truly enjoy HIMSS in Vegas. I find that people are more energetic and more willing to conduct business when the conference is held there. It feels like it is easier to have conversations with people in Vegas. Perhaps it is the oxygen they pump into the casinos or perhaps it is simply the aura of the town rubbing off on people.

Having impromptu conversations is one of things I love most about HIMSS. I always gain a tremendous amount of perspective when I randomly stop and chat with people in the exhibit hall. That trend continued this year, but after the first day, I felt something was missing from my discussions. It wasn’t until today that I realized what that was…there was no single consistent theme from #HIMSS16.

Over the past several years there has always been a single topic that dominated the conversations at HIMSS. Interoperability, Meaningful Use, Big Data, Patient Engagement and Population Health have all been hot-button HIMSS themes. This year, no single dominant topic emerged. There was certainly talk about gender parity, interoperability, moving to a value-based system, telehealth and Big Data, but there was no consistency to the conversations I had with fellow attendees.

I think this is a good sign. In fact, I’m excited about it.

HealthIT is in a state of flux right now. Meaningful Use is winding down, ICD-10 is in the rearview mirror and the hype around digital health is starting to wane. For the first time in years, vendors and healthcare CIOs are free to chart their own paths, pursue their own interests. This is something that hasn’t happened since the EHR incentive program started back in 2010.

Through this lens, the conversations at #HIMSS16 show me that we are about to see progress on many different fronts. Some people I spoke to are looking to invest in new decision support tools that employ the latest in artificial intelligence. Others are seeking new ways of using public data to assist in population health. Everyone I spoke to had one or two projects that they were FINALLY going to get a chance to start in 2016.

This is very exciting and I can’t wait to see how all this pent-up innovative energy manifests for the remainder of 2016.

Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT? – Post #HIMSS16 Blab

Posted on March 4, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: In case you missed the live video interview, you can watch the recording of our discussion in the video embedded below:

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business and Dell is sponsoring my trip to participate in the Dell Healthcare Think Tank. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

Where Do We See Positive Things Happening in Healthcare IT-blog

On Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with the Chief Medical Officers of both Samsung and Dell. As we recover from HIMSS 2016, we’ll be sharing the positive things we saw, heard and are doing in healthcare IT. Far too many people at HIMSS are focusing on the challenges and downside of healthcare IT. In this live video chat, we’re going to focus our discussion on the innovations and amazing technologies that are making healthcare better for everyone.

The great part is that you can join my live conversation with this panel of experts and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask them questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Tuesday, March 8, 2016 at 1 PM ET (10 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of the post or you can subscribe to the blab directly. We’ll be doing a more formal interview for the first 30 minutes and then open up the Blab to others who want to add to the conversation or ask us questions. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

Here are a few more details about our panelists:

We hope you’ll join us live or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation. Plus, considering the size of HIMSS, the three of us likely only saw a small portion of the amazing innovations and technologies that were on display at HIMSS. Please join us on blab and share things you found at HIMSS that everyone should know about.

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Also, you can see Dr. Nick and myself on the Dell Healthcare Think Tank event March 15th on Twitter using the #DoMoreHIT hashtag and the Livestream.

Best Part of #HIMSS16

Posted on I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today was the last day of the exhibit hall at the HIMSS 2016 Annual Conference. As I ponder on the #HIMSSsanity of the last 5 days, I’m struck with one big takeaway.

The people at HIMSS 2016 are the best part of the conference!

Sure, there are outliers in every community. Plus, we all have our weaknesses. However, from my experience, HIMSS 2016’s 41,712 attendees represent and extraordinary group of people.

While healthcare has many challenges. Considering the many amazing people involved in healthcare IT, I have to be very optimistic about our future.

Tomorrow’s the last day and has 2 keynotes. Then, I’ll sleep the whole weekend.

EHR Vendor Commitments to Make Data Work at #HIMSS16

Posted on March 2, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I think back on the first day and a half of HIMSS, I think that this might be the biggest news of the conference so far:

It seems that most people see this as a hollow commitment. Some might argue that we’re jaded by past history and they’d be right. However I’d make a different argument. Interoperability is hard and there are plenty of incentives not to do it. I don’t see this changing because EHR vendors commit to being interoperable.

Let’s be honest. Saying that they’ve “committed” doesn’t matter if they have no skin in the game. There’s no payment for successfully creating a product that’s interoperable. There’s no penalty for not being interoperable. That’s not ONC and HHS’ fault. They only have the levers that the government provides them. There are just so many easy ways for EHR vendors to feign interest in a real commitment to interoperability without actually executing on that vision.

While this type of announcement at HIMSS doesn’t really make me think that the dynamics around healthcare interoperability will change, I do like HHS’ decision to have EHR vendors work out the interoperability problem. If the government couldn’t solve interoperability with $36 billion in incentive money and penalties to boot, do we really think they can do anything to change the equation? At least on their own. This has to be an industry focused effort or it won’t happen.

While I must admit that I’m slowly becoming a skeptic of ever achieving true interoperability of health data, I think we will see point examples where data is being shared. I’m always intrigued by great companies who realize that they can’t be everything, but they can be something. I think we’ll see more of more companies like this.

#HIMSS16 Day 0 – Exhibit Hall Tetris

Posted on February 29, 2016 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Arriving the day before the craziness of HIMSS is an annual tradition for most vendors. The Saturday and Sunday before the main conference are the days when most of the booth building activity happens inside the HIMSS exhibit hall.

I have always enjoyed these pre-conference days at HIMSS. Being in the exhibit hall while booths are being constructed is like watching a life-sized game of Tetris. It’s fun to watch the army of tradespeople unpack crates and piece together complex booths while following instructions that look eerily like those you find with Lego building sets.

#HIMSS16 features move vendors than ever before. Over 1300 booths sprawl across multiple halls in the Sands Expo Center in Las Vegas Nevada. With this many vendors, the aisle-ways were especially difficult to navigate during setup. It’s a testament to the skill of the forklift drivers that they managed to squeeze all the crates in and round the booth areas for setup.

HIMSS16 Exhibit Hall 1

As a marketer and engineer, I relish the opportunity to have a preview of the booths before the hall opens. Every year I find at least five or six booths of unique/fresh design that I add to my must-visit list.

This year was no exception.

HIMSS16 Philips Booth
The Philips booth (3416) looks very impressive this year with four floor-to-ceiling LED displays that look like the ones they use in Football stadiums. The booth itself is beautifully accented with a stunning chandelier in the center. I can’t wait to see it in action when the hall opens.

The CDW Healthcare (3606), SalesForce (10525) and Cerner (2032) booths are also intriguing. I’m particularly interested in the SalesForce booth – partly because of the design but mostly because I’m curious to see how their healthcare offering is shaping up.

If you see a cool or interesting booth over the next few days, I hope you’ll tweet out a notification or post something to the HIMSS16 mobile app.