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Applying Technology to Healthcare Workforce Management

Posted on June 10, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I mentioned before that at HIMSS this year I made a shift in focus from EHR technology to a look at what’s next after EHR. In most cases, the technology has some connection or tie to the EHR, but I was really interested to see where else a healthcare organization can apply technology beyond the EHR software.

I found one such case when I met with Ron Rheinheimer from Avantas. For those not familiar with Avantas, they’re a healthcare scheduling and labor management solution. In most cases, their workforce solution is something the nurses choose and often the CNO. I imagine that’s why it’s not talked about nearly as much as things like the EHR. It takes a pretty progressive CIO at a hospital to be able to see through all the noise of other regulations and work with the CNO on a workforce management solution. Or it takes a pretty vocal CNO who can make the case for the solution.

Ron Rheinheimer from Avantas made a pretty good case for why workforce management should have a much higher priority for hospital CIOs. He noted that about 60% of a hospital’s budget is labor expenses and 50% of the labor budget is for nursing. It’s no wonder that nurses take it hard when a hospital goes through layoffs thanks to an EHR implementation. However, given those numbers, optimizing your workforce could save your organization a lot of money.

I think this is particularly true as hospital systems get larger and larger. We’ve all seen the trend around hospital system consolidation and as these organizations get larger their staffing requirements get much more complex. Most of them start moving towards a centralized nurse staffing model. They start working on a floating pool of nurses in the hospital. While humans are amazing, once things get complex, it’s a great place for technology to assist humans.

Ron Rheinheimer also told me about the new incentive models that many hospitals are employing to be able to incentivize nurses to take the hard to fill shifts. Night shift differential has long been apart of every workforce, but with technology you can use analytics to really understand which shifts are the hardest to fill and reward your nurses appropriately for taking those hard to fill shifts. My guess is that we’re still on the leading edge of what will be possible with technology and managing the schedule in a hospital. Real time dynamic pricing for shifts is something that only technology could really do well.

As you can tell, I’m new to this area of healthcare technology. However, I find it fascinating and I believe it’s an area where technology can really improve the current workflow. I look forward to learning more.

Great Interview with Jonathan Bush

Posted on May 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Jonathan Bush is the very best interview in healthcare IT. A few years back, Neil Versel grabbed Jonathan Bush at his athenahealth cloud party at HIMSS for an interview. It’s now become quite a tradition. They talk a lot about CommonWell, the impact of Medicare penalties, and much more. Here’s this year’s interview of Jonathan Bush at HIMSS by Neil Versel:

P.S. Yes, HIMSS was forever ago and I’m just catching up on stuff now.

HIMSS15: Adoption Still a Problem for Organizations Swapping EHRs – Breakaway Thinking

Posted on May 20, 2015 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Todd Stansfield, Instructional Writer from The Breakaway Group (A Xerox Company). Check out all of the blog posts in the Breakaway Thinking series.
Todd Stansfield

Each year the Health Information and Management Systems Society’s (HIMSS) annual conference is the Super Bowl of health IT. No other conference boasts more attendees ranging from health IT innovators and collaborators to pioneers. This year 40,000 plus participants descended on Chicago, all eager to learn about the new direction, trends, and solutions of the industry.

As always, buzzwords were aplenty—interoperability, care coordination, patient experience, and value-based care, to mention a few. During her keynote address on April 16, Karen DeSalvo, National Coordinator for the ONC, called the current state of health IT the “tipping point.” In 2011 the ONC released its four-year strategic plan focused on implementing and adopting electronic health records (EHRs). Now, DeSalvo says the industry is changed and ready to move beyond EHRs to technologies that will create “true interoperability.”

Enlightening conversations were happening among the crowded booths, hallways, and meeting rooms between organizations looking to ‘rip and replace’ their current EHR for a new one. While some organizations are struggling to unlock data across disparate systems, others are looking to upgrade their current system for one compatible with ICD-10, Meaningful Use, analytics solutions, or a combination of these. Still others are looking to replace systems they dislike for lack of functionality, vendor relationships, etc. In many cases, replacing an EHR is needed to ensure interoperability is at the very least viable. This buzz at HIMSS is a strong indicator that EHRs are still an important and essential part of health IT, and perhaps some organizations have not reached the tipping point.

In addition to the many challenges these organizations are facing—from data portability, an issue John Lynn wrote about in August 2012, to the cost of replacing the system—leaders are agonizing over the resistance they are facing from clinician end users. How can these organizations force clinicians to give up systems they once resisted, then embraced and worked so hard to adopt? How can leadership inspire the same level of engagement needed for adoption? The challenge is similar to transitioning from paper to an EHR, only more significant. Whereas the reasons for switching from paper were straightforward—patient safety, efficiency, interoperability, etc.—they are not so clear when switching applications.

Clinicians are also making harsher comparisons between applications—from every drop-down list, to icon, to keyboard shortcut. These comparisons are occurring at drastically different phases in the adoption lifecycle. Consider the example of an end user needing to document a progress note. In the old EHR, this user knew how to copy forward previous documentation, but in the new system she doesn’t know if this functionality even exists. Already the end user is viewing the new system as cumbersome and inefficient compared to the old application. Multiply this comparison by each of the various tasks she completes throughout her day, and the end user is strongly questioning her organization’s decision to make the change.

This highlights an important point: Swapping one EHR for another will take more planning, effort, and strategy than a first-ever implementation. The methods for achieving adoption are the same, but the degree to which they are employed is not. Leadership will not only have to re-engage end users and facilitate buy-in, they will have to address the loss of efficiency and optimization by replacing the old application.

Leadership should start by clearly outlining the reasons for change, a long-term strategy, as well frustrations end users can expect. They should establish a strong governance and support structure to ensure end users adhere to policies, procedures, and best practices for using the application. The organizations that will succeed will provide end users with role-based education complete with hands-on experience completing best practice workflows in the application. Education should include competency tests that assess end users’ ability to complete key components of their workflow. Additionally, organizations must capture and track performance measurements to ensure optimized use of the system and identify areas of need. And because adoption recedes after application upgrades and workflow enhancements, all efforts should be sustained and modified as needed.

While HIMSS15 brought to the stage a wealth of new ideas, solutions, and visions for the future of health IT, the struggle to adopt an EHR has not completely gone away. Many organizations are grappling with their current EHR and choosing to replace it in hopes of meeting the triple aim of improving care, costs, and population health. For these organizations to be prepared for true interoperability, they must overcome challenges unseen in paper to electronic implementations. And if done successfully, only then will our industry uniformly reach the tipping point, a point where we can begin to put buzzwords into practice.

Xerox is a sponsor of the Breakaway Thinking series of blog posts.

Neat Telemedicine Peripheral

Posted on April 23, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m a techguy by education and background (literally @techguy on Twitter) and so I love cool new tech toys. Plus, I’m a boy and you know boys and their toys. So, I was really excited when leading into HIMSS, Revolve Robotics offered to send me a Kubi which I could test out. I’ve personally found that with devices, the only way I can really effectively write about them is to have one and use it for a while. A 15-30 minute canned test at an exhibit hall just doesn’t work for me. With that in mind, I put the Kubi through its paces while I was away at HIMSS.
kubi-move
For those not famliar with the Kubi, it’s a robotic arm that makes video conferencing much more engaging since the person on the other end of the video conference can control the Kubi and point it in any direction they want. It’s literally as if you were present and turned your head a different direction to see what else was happening in the room.

Here’s some pictures which show the Kubi in an actual patient room (click on the image to see a larger version):

The Kubi works with a variety of iOS and Android devices. I was surprised that even my Samsung S5 smartphone fit into the Kubi. Along with the Kubi itself there are 2 different mobile applications. One you can use to control the Kubi while using Skype, Google Hangouts, etc for the video conferencing. The other app is Kubi video which provides a really seamless integration between controlling the Kubi and streaming video. It’s pretty slick to connect and just click where you want the Kubi to “look”.

One challenge in healthcare is that Kubi video is not HIPAA compliant, but Revolve Robotics recently announced partnerships with swyMed to offer a real telemedicine solution for healthcare on top of the Kubi. They’re also working with partners like swyMed to integrate the Kubi control functions into these third party video conference providers. That will be a great feature since it is a little odd to control the Kubi with one app and have the video conference working in another one.

As I start to think about how a Kubi and video conferencing application could be used in healthcare, I can see a number of opportunities. On the one hand you have the patient focused applications which allow someone who’s “stuck” in a hospital bed to be able to communicate with their caregivers or loved ones. Often, the patient can’t even get out of the bed or isn’t strong enough to hold up a tablet for an extended period of time. The Kubi solves that problem. Plus, it allows the friends and family to look around the hospital room. I can already see someone watching TV with their loved one over the Kubi. Small things like that really change the patient experience.

On the other side of things, I could see a Kubi working really well for doctors or nurses wanting to check in with their patients. If the patient clicks the nurse call button, why does the nurse have to run all the way down to the room? They could just hop on the Kubi, find the patient and see what’s needed. In fact, doing so could save them trips back and forth to the room which wastes time.

I think about when my wife was giving birth. How cool would it have been for the doctor to do a video chat on the Kubi with us as opposed to just talking with the nurse and the nurse relaying the message? It doesn’t need to be every update. Maybe it’s when we first showed up or when something major changes. Of course, this could be done with a lot of telemedicine products, but it’s interesting the way the Kubi makes it more dynamic and friendly.

Going back to my personal experience with the product. I was sad that the Kubi video didn’t work with my older iPad. It was one we weren’t using as much anymore and so I could have easily just left it in the Kubi while I was away. Unfortunately, it was too old of a version for that to work. Not a big deal for us though since we have lots of devices in our house.

I still hate the blue tooth pairing of devices (another reason to have a dedicated device that’s paired once and then you forget it), but they have done some unique things to make the pairing recognize the device once it’s put in the Kubi. I wonder if wifi pairing will come soon. I hope so.

It was really fun to use the Kubi while I was at HIMSS to connect with my family back home. In my case, I really could just leave it running and connect to it whenever I wanted. There’s nothing like my 2 year old’s face when he sees me. The nice thing with the Kubi is that talking with a 2 year old is hard. There’s no way he can hold the tablet still and there’s no way he’ll sit still (at least my 2 year old). So, I could follow him around, switch to one of my other kids or my wife and they didn’t have to fight over who was on camera. I could control it myself.


All in all, the Kubi is a pretty creative product. I think it will have a bigger place in healthcare as they start integrating the robotic controls into other applications. The 2 app approach is not going to work out that well for most of healthcare. It needs the integrated experience. I think the Kubi will likely ride the wave of Telemedicine adoption since it makes a nice peripheral to all of those efforts. That’s a good thing for the Kubi since I think Telemedicine is just now starting to come into its own.

Mobile Health Happenings

Posted on April 22, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It looks like I might have been wrong about mobile health really cropping up at HIMSS15. Then again, maybe I just missed a bunch of them in the mass of attendees that were at the event. Plus, I knew that I’d see the mobile health related companies at mHealth Summit, Connected Health Symposium, Health 2.0 or CES sooner or later. So, I was more interested in the non mobile health related companies at HIMSS.

With that said, every company has some approach to mobile health. Sure, the Apple Watch announcements from Vocera, Epocrates, and Medisafe (to name just a few that I saw) are going to get the headline. Press releases with Apple Watch in their title seem to get extra attention. Press love the latest shiny object even if we have no idea whether the Apple Watch is going to be adopted by the masses (Personally I think it will be a niche device for the rich). However, there are a few mobile happenings that are worth watching.

Text – Don’t underestimate the power of text. It’s amazing what you can do with 140 characters. Of course, in healthcare you need to use secure text (SMS is not HIPAA secure). Turns out that secure text can actually provide a lot of benefits beyond SMS. I’m still very bullish on the simplicity of a text. Feels like a simple solution, but that’s what makes it beautiful. The fact we haven’t fully leveraged it also illustrates how far behind healthcare is compared to other industries.

Mobile Apps – I think there are two kinds of mobile health apps that are breaking out. First is the mobile apps that are tied to enterprise systems. This could be an EHR app or increasingly we’re seeing the population health or analytics vendors pushing the data and communication channels to mobile devices. More innovative is the wellness gaming apps that I’ve seen. I don’t think anyone’s fully cracked the nut yet, but there are some people really working on wellness motivation and behavior change. I expect we’ll see a game changer in this regard in the next 1-2 years.

Sensors – The smartphone or an iPad are becoming the brain for all of these personal health sensors. In fact, the phone is becoming a health sensor itself. Reminds me of CapsuleTech which has been putting black boxes under hospital beds for years in order to get the data from a medical device. Now we all have a “black box” in our pocket that collects and communicates our health data. Personal health sensors are exploding. Implantables is next.

Telemedicine – We want out healthcare when we want it, where we want it. Telemedicine is going to be the solution that solves that problem. Katherine Rourke has a great post up on EMR and HIPAA about the various telemedicine solutions. So, I won’t rehash those options here. However, there’s a wide spectrum of telemedicine offerings and many of them are mobile.

Those are a few of the biggest trends I see in mobile health. I’m sure there’s something I’ve missed. So, I look forward to hearing what I’ve missed in the comments below.

Some High Level Perspectives on FHIR

Posted on April 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Before HIMSS, I posted about my work to understand FHIR. There’s some great information in that post as I progress in my understanding of FHIR, how it’s different than other standards, where it’s at in its evolution, and whether FHIR is going to really change healthcare or not. What’s clear to me is that many are on board with FHIR and we’ll hear a lot more about it in the future. Many at HIMSS were trying to figure it out like me.

What isn’t as clear to me is whether FHIR is really all that better. Based on many of my discussions, FHIR really feels like the next iteration of what we’ve been doing forever. Sure, the foundation is more flexible and is a better standard than what we’ve had with CCDA and any version of HL7. However, I feel like it’s still just an evolution of the same.

I’m working on a future post that will look at the data for each of the healthcare standards and how they’ve evolved. I’m hopeful that it will illustrate well how the data has (or has not) evolved over time. More on that to come in the future.

One vendor even touted how their FHIR expert has been working on these standards for decades (I can’t remember the exact number of years). While I think there’s tremendous value that comes from experience with past standards, it also has me asking the question of why we think we’ll get different results when we have more or less the same people working on these new standards.

My guess is that they’d argue that they’ve learned a lot from the past standards that they can incorporate or avoid in the new standards. I don’t think these experienced people should be left out of the process because their background and knowledge of history can really help. However, if there isn’t some added outside perspective, then how can we expect to get anything more than what we’ve been getting forever (and we all know what we’ve gotten to date has been disappointing).

Needless to say, while the industry is extremely interested in FHIR, my take coming out of HIMSS is much more skeptical that FHIR will really move the industry forward the way people are describing. Will it be better than what we have today? I think it could be, but that’s not really a high bar. Will FHIR really helps us achieve healthcare interoperability nirvana? It seems to me that it’s really not designed to push that agenda forward.

What do you think of FHIR? Am I missing something important about FHIR and it’s potential to transform healthcare? Do you agree with the assessment that FHIR very well could be more of the same limited thinking on healthcare data exchange? I look forward to continue my learning about FHIR in the comments.

My Overall View of Healthcare IT After HIMSS15

Posted on April 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I fly home from HIMSS15 (literally), I’ve been thinking how to summarize my annual visit to the mecca of healthcare IT conferences we know as HIMSS. I’ve seen a bunch of numbers around attendance and exhibitors and I believe they’re somewhere around 43,000 attendees and 1300 exhibitors. It definitely felt that massive. The interest in using technology to improve healthcare has never been higher. This shouldn’t be a surprise for anyone. When I look at the path forward for healthcare, every single scenario has technology playing a massive role.

With that in mind, I think that the healthcare IT world is experiencing a massive war between a large number of competing interests. Many of those interests are deeply entrenched in what they’ve been doing for seemingly ever. Some of these companies are really trying to dig in and continue to enjoy the high ground that they’ve enjoyed for many years. This includes vendors at HIMSS, but also many large and small healthcare organizations (the small entrenched healthcare organizations weren’t likely at HIMSS though) who enjoyed the status quo.

The problem with this battlefield is that they’re battling against a massive shift in reimbursement model. They can try and stay entrenched, but the shift in healthcare business model is going to absolutely force them to change. This is not a question of if, but when. This doesn’t keep these organizations from bombing away as they resist the changes.

If you’re a healthcare startup company entering the battlefield (to continue the analogy), you’re out in the open and absolutely vulnerable. You’re very rarely the target of this major entrenched players, but sometimes you get impacted by collateral damage. As the various organizations throw bombs at each other you have to work hard to avoid getting in their way. This is a tricky challenge.

Even more challenging to these startup companies is they don’t have a way to access many of the entrenched companies so they can work together around a common vision. Most of the startups would love to work with the entrenched healthcare companies, but they don’t even have a way to start the conversation.

The mid size healthcare IT companies are even more interesting. They’ve started to carve a space for them in the battle and many of the entrenched healthcare IT vendors are scared at what this means for them. They’re using every means possible to disrupt the competition. At HIMSS I saw the scars from many of these battles.

Certainly this description is true of many industries. Welcome to economic competition and capitalism. Although, this year at HIMSS I found the battle to be much more intense. In the past couple years meaningful use opened up new territories to be “conquered.” There was enough “land” to go around that companies were often working to capture new territories as opposed to battling their competitors for the same opportunities. That’s why I think we’re in a very different market today versus the past couple years.

The great thing is that in periods of turmoil often comes the most amazing innovations. I believe that’s what we’re going to see over the next couple years. Although, I predict that most of these innovations are going to come from places we don’t expect. It’s just too hard for companies to innovate themselves out of business. There are a few exceptions in history and we might see a few exceptions in healthcare. However, my bet is on the most successful companies being those that choose to obliterate as opposed to automate.

What’s most exciting to me is that healthcare organizations and patients seem to be ready for change. There are varying degrees of readiness, but I believe I’ve seen a groundswell of change that’s coming for healthcare. As a blogger this of course has me excited, but as a patient it has me excited as well.

What were your thoughts of HIMSS 2015? What do you think of the analogy?

While the battle is on in healthcare IT, the best part of HIMSS is always the people. Every industry has some bad apples, but for the most part I’m always deeply impacted by the good nature of so many people I meet at HIMSS. They are sincere in their efforts to try and improve healthcare for good. We certainly have our challenges in healthcare, but similar to what George Bush said in his keynote, I’m optimistic that the good people in healthcare will be able to produce amazing results. The best days of healthcare are not behind us, but are ahead of us.

Some Inspiring and Thought Provoking Ideas from the HIMSS15 Final Keynote

Posted on April 16, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The last keynote at HIMSS is always inspiring for me. They’ve almost always ended up being one of the more prominent memories for me from HIMSS. This year was no different. I really need to chew on a bunch of what was said still, but Jeremy Gutsche was throwing out nuggets of wisdom throughout his talk. Here are some tweets that show what I mean:

HIMSS15 Social Media and Influencer Thoughts

Posted on April 15, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I think this has been the case the past couple years. The Tuesday of HIMSS seems to always be my day of social media. This year was no different. This was highlighted by a meetup that Shahid Shah and myself did at the HIMSS spot. At first I wasn’t sure if anyone would show for the event. Luckily, 1-2 people were there early and so at least we wouldn’t be talking to ourselves. In fact, Shahid asked for those that weren’t there for the meetup to free up the seats for those that were there for it. Luckily, when I wasn’t watching a whole bunch of people showed up and the event was standing room only. I guess Shahid can really draw a crowd.

What was impressive was the mix of the audience. There was a large group of some of the most influential people in social media (I won’t name names since there were too many and I’ll forget someone), along with a number of newer people. I love that mix and particularly love the new people that are still finding their way. Sometimes they seem a bit like dear in the headlights. That’s ok. That’s part of the fun of learning.

What’s clear to me is that social influencing as really matured for many people, but there are still a lot of people that are trying to figure it out. It’s amazing to see the difference. I’ll be interested to watch this evolve. I still see so much opportunity with it and many aren’t taking advantage of it.

Then, my night was capped off with the New Media Meetup at HIMSS15. This is the 6th year I’ve hosted this event and it seems to get better each year. I’m always humbled by the list of people that register to attend. Plus, I’m extremely appreciative of Stericycle and Patient Prompt that basically through a big party for all these amazing people. It’s always amazing to see the broad spectrum of people that attend and how down to earth they are even given many of their significant social influence. Plus, what an amazing preview for the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference.

I didn’t go into many details on what was at the session or who attending the New Media Meetup, but you can get a lot of that information by checking out the #HITMC hashtag. Thanks to all of my new and old social media friends that made today special. I keep learning from you.

I’ll leave this with just one insight that really hit home to me when I shared it in the meetup. Really caring about the people you’re connecting with, the topics you’re sharing and the work you’re doing really comes through in social media. If you’re faking it, people will usually see that. Plus, really caring about those you connect with on social media and the things you share will change your life in really amazing ways.

Reminds me of the wrestler, Jessie Ventura who became governor of Minnesota. One time I heard him say he didn’t have to have a good memory, because he always said what he thought and never told things that were half true. On social media, if you’re faking it, it makes it hard to remember all the things you’ve faked. If you’re authentic and real, it makes it so much easier.

A Few Quick HIMSS15 Thoughts

Posted on April 13, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s been a long day packed with meetings at HIMSS 2015. I need to reach out to HIMSS to get the final numbers, but word is that there are over 40,000 people at the show. In the hallways, the exhibit hall and the taxi lines it definitely seems to be the case. I’m not sure the jump in attendees, but I saw one tweet that IBM had 400 people there. Don’t quote me on it since I can’t find the tweet, but that’s just extraordinary to even consider that many people from one company.

Of course, the reason I can’t find the tweet is that the Twitter stream has been setting new records each day. The HIMSS 2015 Twitter Tips and Tricks is valuable if you want to get value out of the #HIMSS15 Twitter stream. I also have to admit that I might be going a bit overboard on the selfies. I think I’ve got the @mandibpro selfie disease. Not sure the treatment for it since my doctor doesn’t do a telemedicine visit while I’m in Chicago.

I’ve had some amazing meetings that will inform my blog posts for weeks to come. However, my biggest takeaway from the first official day of HIMSS is that change is in the air. The forces are at work to make interoperability a reality. It’s going to be a massive civil war as the various competing parties battle it out as they set the pathway forward.

You might think that this is a bit of an exaggeration, but I think it’s pretty close to what’s happening. What’s not clear to me is whose going to win and what the final outcome will look like. There are so many competing interests that are trying to get at the data and make it valuable for the doctor and health system.

Along those lines, I’m absolutely fascinated by the real time analytics capabilities that I saw being built. A number of companies I talked to are moving beyond the standard batch loaded enterprise data warehouse approach to a real time (or as one vendor said…we all have to call it near real time) stream of data. I think this is going to drive a massive change in innovation.

I’ll be talking more about the various vendors I saw and their approaches to this in future posts after HIMSS. While I’m excited by some of the many things these companies are doing, I still feel like many of them are constrained by their inability to get to the data. A number of them were working on such small data sets. This was largely because they can’t get the other data. One vendor told me that their biggest challenge is getting an organization to turn over their data for them for analysis.

While it’s important that organizations are extremely careful with how they handle and share their data. More organizations should be working with trusted partners in order to extract more value out of the data and to more importantly make new discoveries. The discoveries we’re making today are really great, but I can only imagine how much more we could accomplish with more data to inform those discoveries.