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#HIMSS18: Oh The Humanity

Posted on April 2, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sean Erreger, LCSW or @StuckonSW as some of you may know him.

It was a privilege to attend the 2018 HIMSS global conference this year. Having blogged and tweeted about Health IT for a couple of years, it was great to finally live it. By taking a deep dive, attending presentations, demoing products, and networking; I came to a greater understanding of how Health IT tackles the problems I hope to solve. From a social work perspective, I continue to be fascinated with the idea that technology can facilitate change.  Getting lost in artificial intelligence, machine learning, natural language processing, and predictive analytics was easy. It was exciting to learn the landscape of solutions, amount of automation, and workflow management possible. As a care manager, I believe these tools can be incredibly impactful.

However, despite all the technology and solutions, came the reminder that Health IT is a human process. There were two presentations that argued that we can’t divorce the humanity from health information technology process.  First was on the value of behavioral science and secondly a presentation on provider burnout and physician suicide.

The Value Of Behavioral Science

This was a panel presentation and discussion moderated by Dr. Amy Bucher of Mad*Pow including Dr. Heather Cole-Lewis of Johnson and Johnson, Dr. David Ahern of the FCC, and Dr. John Torous of Harvard Medical school. All experts were a part of projects related to Personal Connected Health Alliance. They asked attendees to consider the following challenges and how behavior science play a role…

Questions like how do we measure outcome and defining what “engagement” look like are key to how we build Health IT.  Yes, things like apps and wearables are cool but how do we measure their success. This can often be a challenge. It often feels like health IT is trying to outdo each other about who is coming up with the coolest piece of technology. However, when we get down to the nuts and bolts and start to measure engagement in technology, we might not like the results…

This presentation reminded me that technology is not often enough. Valuing the importance of “meeting people where they are”, may not include technology at all. We have to challenge ourselves to look ethically at the evidence and ensure that digital health is something a patient may or may not want.

Technology as a Solution to Physician Burnout and Suicide

It was reassuring to know even before I got to HIMSS that suicide prevention was going to be part of the conversation. Janae Sharpe and Melissa McCool presented on physician suicide and tools to potentially prevent it. This presents another human aspect of Health IT, the clinicians that use them. The facts about physician suicide are hard to ignore…

As someone who has done presentations about burnout and secondary trauma, I am acutely aware of how stressful clinical care can be.  It is unclear whether technology is a cause but it is certainly a factor, even in physician suicide. The research on this complex, but to blame the paperwork demands for burnout and physician suicide is tricky. To attribute a cause to things is always a challenge but my take away is that the Health IT community might be part of the problem but the presenters made a compelling case that it should be part of the solution. That not only reducing clicks and improving workflow is needed but providing support is critical.

They talked about the need to measure “burnout” and see how the Health IT community can design technology to support those at risk.  They have created a scale called the Sharp Index to try to measure physician burnout and also build technology to provide support. This seems to be striving for that right mix between measurement in the hopes of making space for human processes in a complex technology space.

Cooking The Mix Between Tech and Human Care

These presentations leave Health IT with many questions. Apps to provide a means of clinical care exist but are they working? How can we tell we are getting digital health right? How can we tell if technology is making a difference in patients’ lives? How do we define “success” of an app? Is technology having a negative impact on clinical care and clinicians themselves? If so, how do we measure that?

These questions force us to take an intentional look at how we measure outcomes but more importantly how we define them. Both presentations stressed the multi-disciplinary nature of health information technology development.  That no matter what the technology, you need to ask what problem does it solve and for who? As we consider building out AI and other automation we need to keep the humanity in healthcare.  So we can better care for ourselves as providers and ask what patients need in a human centered manner.

For a deeper dive into each presentation, I have created twitter recaps of both the Behavioral Science Panel and the presentation on Physician Suicide.

About Sean Erreger
Sean is Licensed Clinical Social Worker in New York. He is interested in technology and how it is facilitating change in a variety of areas. Within Health IT is interested in how it can include mental health, substance abuse, and information about social determinants. He can be found at his blog www.stuckonsocialwork.com.

A Look Back at #HIMSS18 – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on March 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/16 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from Healthcare Scene.

If you’re like me, you’ve come back from the HIMSS Annual Conference in Las Vegas and you’re experiencing what some people call the #HIMSSHaze or the #HIMSSHangover. It’s a bit of an overwhelming experience to attend a conference with 44k people and 1350 vendors. Plus, add in the lights and stimulus of Las Vegas and it’s no surprise why we all head home a little tired.

Hopefully you’re back home recovering from the event. This week’s chat we’ll do a kind of post-mortem on the event where we share our insights and experiences. What did we see? What didn’t we see? Were there any game changing announcements?

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we wrap up #HIMSS18 with the following questions:

T1: How would you describe your #HIMSS18 experience? Big Win? Bust? Meh? and why? #HITsm

T2: What topics were trending at #HIMSS18 and what does it mean for healthcare? #HITsm

T3: What did you wish you’d seen at #HIMSS18 but didn’t find it? Should HIMSS work to have it next year? #HITsm

T4: Most profound thing you heard or saw at #HIMSS18? #HITsm

T5: Share your favorite piece of content coming out of #HIMSS18 and why you found it valuable. #HITsm

Bonus: What’s next on your conference agenda for 2018 after #HIMSS18? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Five Not-so-typical meetings at #HIMSS18

Posted on March 7, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

As the first day of the #HIMSS18 exhibit hall dawned, I had mentally prepared myself for a series of meetings where we would be discussing the product updates, client signings and releases of new thought-leadership content. Fortunately, the universe decided to throw a curveball and I ended up with no fewer than five meetings that were completely different than what I expected.

Meeting 1 – Nuance

I had the opportunity to sit down with Nuance at #HIMSS18. I wrote an earlier post about their #AI Marketplace and I fully expected to listen to an update on that effort plus learn details about the company’s recent announcement of a multi-year collaboration with Partners Healthcare. They surprised me by speaking instead about the importance of their work in the area of incidental findings.

Brenda Hodge, Chief Marketing Officer of Nuance Healthcare spoke passionately about the work that Nuance is doing to help ensure incidental findings are brought to the attention of primary care physicians. Through their AI prioritization algorithms and natural-language-processing capabilities, Nuance has plans to capture this potentially vital imaging information and highlight it so that the right clinical interventions can be applied sooner.

It was the fervor and fire with which Hodge spoke that was the not-so-typical part of our meeting. It was fun to share that moment with a kindred spirit, passionate about improving healthcare.

Meeting 2 – Voalte

The good folks at Voalte provided me the opportunity to do something I have never done at HIMSS – moderate a meetup. We assembled a fantastic group of panelist: @ShahidnShah @innonurse @drandrew76 and Angela Kauffman (from @Voalte) had a lively discussion about Physician Communications. The meetup was even better than I expected.

The conversation flowed easily. Online engagement was high. A good sized crowd gathered to listen. It was a fantastic way to start the day. We captured the meetup on video so watch for clips from the meetup on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel once we recover from #HIMSSanity.

Meeting 3 – TigerConnect (Formerly Known as TigerText)

I stopped by for a quick chat with the team at TigerConnect – the company formally known as TigerText – to talk about their recent rebrand. This meeting was atypical of ones I have had at HIMSS because it was solely focused on their marketing rather than on their products. It was refreshing to have the chance to get a behind-the-scenes view of their recent rebranding initiative.

TigerText is a pioneer in the field of secure communications in hospitals and their brand had become well-established. Unfortunately the “Text” portion of their name was becoming a limitation as their company expanded into adjacent spaces and extended their platform’s capabilities. In just a few months, they made the decision to rebrand and executed it in time for #HIMSS18.

I’ll be writing a more in-depth piece on this after HIMSS, but felt it was worth mentioning because I have never had this type of frank, honest marketing conversation at HIMSS before.

Meeting 4 – Lenovo Health

I stopped by the Lenovo Health booth to see what new things were happening – especially since I had the chance to attend their HealthIT Think Tank event last year. I came for news and I ended up taking a selfie with a custom-made sign. It was energizing to just do something fun in their booth. It was 10 minutes of being creative and capturing a moment in their space. You can see how big our smiles are in the pictures we took.

Meeting 5 – Cerner

The team at Cerner reached out a few days ago and asked to get together. By pure chance, they suggested a time that had recently freed up on my calendar (one of the few open spots I had). I honestly did not read the request carefully before agreeing to it. I thought I was going to be part of a press briefing that was being broadcast. It turned out that the Cerner team wanted to me to be part of their onsite podcast.

We ended up have a wonderful conversation about Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall. It was a free-flowing discussion that I was not expecting. You can listen to the podcast here.

It was so much fun that we continued chatting for 20min after we wrapped the recording. At the end I had the opportunity to officially welcome the Cerner podcasting/social media/marketing crew to #pinksocks. Like the Lenovo Health meeting earlier, it was a rare chance to create a lasting memory. I will not soon forget that #pinksocks gifting – the enthusiasm, surprise and good feeling was just incredible.

Day 1 takeaway – small moments, lasting memories

For me, Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall was all about creating lasting memories from small moments. It wasn’t about the big splashy announcements, but the open/honest conversation. As I reflect on the day, I can’t help but smile at the how the stars aligned to give me a day at HIMSS that is the ideal we strive for in healthcare. Imagine if all across the healthcare ecosystem, clinicians were able to have small moments with patients that were open, honest, free-flowing as well as conversational and where both left the encounter feeling energized.

We need more days like this.

Texting Patients Is OK Under HIPAA, as long as you…

Posted on March 6, 2018 I Written By

Mike Semel is a noted thought leader, speaker, blogger, and best-selling author of HOW TO AVOID HIPAA HEADACHES . He is the President and Chief Security Officer of Semel Consulting, focused on HIPAA and other compliance requirements; cyber security; and Business Continuity planning. Mike is a Certified Business Continuity Professional through the Disaster Recovery Institute, a Certified HIPAA Professional, Certified Security Compliance Specialist, and Certified Health IT Specialist. He has owned or managed technology companies for over 30 years; served as Chief Information Officer (CIO) for a hospital and a K-12 school district; and managed operations at an online backup company.

OCR Director Severino Makes Policy from the Podium

Speaking at the HIMSS health IT conference in Las Vegas on Tuesday, Roger Severino, Director of the US Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR), the HIPAA enforcement agency, said that health care providers may share Protected Health Information (PHI) with patients through standard text messages. Providers must first warn their patients that texting is not secure, gain the patients’ authorization, and document the patients’ consent.

In 2013, the HIPAA Omnibus Final Rule allowed healthcare providers to communicate Electronic Protected Health Information (ePHI) with patients through unencrypted e-mail, if the provider informs the patient that their e-mail service is not secure, gains the patient’s authorization to accept the risk, and documents the patient’s consent.

A HIMSS audience member asked Severino why the OCR hasn’t issued similar guidance for text messaging with patients. “I don’t see a difference,” Severino said. “I think it’s empowering the patient, making sure that their data is as accessible as possible in the way they want to receive it, and that’s what we want to do.”

“Wow! That’s a big change,” said Tom Leary, Vice President of Government Relations for HIMSS. “That’s wonderful. Actually, the physician community has been clamoring for clarification on that for several years now. Our physician community will be very supportive of that.”

The 2013 OCR guidance for e-mails,  and Severino’s announcement about text messages, only applies to communications with patients. All HIPAA Covered Entities and Business Associates are still forbidden to use unsecure communications tools to communicate with each other.

Messages sent through free e-mail services are not private. Google’s Gmail Terms of Service, allow Google to “use…reproduce…communicate, publish…publicly display and distribute” your e-mail messages. Health care providers must use encrypted e-mail or secure e-mail systems to communicate ePHI outside of their organizations.

In 2012, a small medical practice was penalized $ 100,000 for sharing patient information through free Internet services, including e-mail.  According to the resolution agreement, Phoenix Cardiac Surgery “daily transmitted ePHI from an Internet-based email account to workforce members’ personal Internet-based email accounts.”

While the OCR may be best-known for its HIPAA enforcement, it has pushed healthcare organizations to lower barriers that have prevented patients from obtaining their medical records. The Omnibus Rule required health care providers to only recover actual costs when providing patients with copies of their records.

In its 2016 guidance, the OCR set a $ 6.50 limit (inclusive of all labor, supplies, and postage) for health care providers “that do not want to go through the process of calculating actual or average allowable costs for requests for electronic copies of PHI maintained electronically.”

The federal requirement to recover actual costs, or a flat fee of $ 6.50, supersedes state laws that allowed providers to charge for medical record searches and per-page fees. Maine caps the cost at $ 250 for a medical record, far above the federal $ 6.50 flat fee.

 

Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on February 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/2 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora) on the topic “Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare.”

Machine learning is hitting a furious pace in the consumer world, where AI estimates how long your food will take to arrive and targets you with the purchases you can’t resist. This week, we’ll discuss the implications of this technology as we translate it to the healthcare ecosystem.

Current machine learning topics of interest to healthcare range from adaptive and behavior-based care delivery pathways to the regulation of so-called “black box” systems those that cannot easily explain the reasons with which they made a prediction.

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we discuss the following questions:

T1: The Machine Learning community is currently discussing FAT: Fairness, Accountability, & Transparency. What does this mean in healthIT? #HITsm

T2: How can machine learning integrate naturally in clinical and patient facing workflows? #HITsm

T3: What consumer applications of machine learning are best suited for transition to the healthcare setting? #HITsm

T4: The FDA regulates software AS a medical device and IN a medical device. How do you envision this distinction today, and do you foresee it changing? #HITsm

T5: What successes have you seen in healthcare machine learning? Are particular care settings better suited for ML? Where do you see that alignment? #HITsm

Bonus: Is there a place for machine learning black box predictions? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/9 – HIMSS Break – No #HITsm Chat

3/16 – TBD

3/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Some Of The Questions I Plan To Ask At #HIMSS18

Posted on February 23, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As always, this year’s HIMSS event will feature enough noise, sound and color to overwhelm your senses for months afterward. And talk about a big space to tread — I’ve come away with blisters more than once after attending.

Nonetheless, in my book it’s always worth attending the show. While no one vendor or session might blow you away, finding out directly what trends and products generated the most buzz is always good. The key is not only to attend the right educational sessions or meet the right people but to figure out how companies are making decisions.

Below, here are some of the questions that I hope to ask (and hopefully find answers) at the show. If you have other questions to suggest I’d love to bring them with me to the show —  the way I see it, the more the merrier!

-Anne

Blockchain

Vendors:  What functions does blockchain perform in your solution and what are the benefits of these additions? What made that blockchain the best technology choice for getting the job done? What challenges have you faced in developing a platform that integrates blockchain technology, and how are you addressing them? Is blockchain the most cost-efficient way of accomplishing the task you have in mind? What problems is blockchain best suited to address?

Providers: Have you rolled out any blockchain-based systems? If you haven’t currently deployed blockchain technology, do you expect to do so the future? When do you think that will happen? How will you know when it’s time to do so? What benefits do you think it will offer to your organization, and why? Do you think blockchain implementations could generate a significant level of additional server infrastructure overhead?

AI

Vendors: What makes your approach to healthcare AI unique and/or beneficial?  What is involved in integrating your AI product or service with existing provider technology, and how long does it usually take? Do providers have to do this themselves or do you help? Did you develop your own algorithms, license your AI engine or partner with someone else deliver it? Can you share any examples of how your customers have benefited by using AI?

Providers: What potential do you think AI has to change the way you deliver care? What specific benefits can AI offer your organization? Do you think healthcare AI applications are maturing, and if not how will you know when they have? What types of AI applications potentially interest you, and are you pilot-testing any of them?

Interoperability

Vendors:  How does your solution overcome barriers still remaining to full health data sharing between all healthcare industry participants? What do you think are the biggest interoperability challenges the industry faces? Does your solution require providers to make any significant changes to their infrastructure or call for advanced integration with existing systems? How long does it typically take for customers to go live with your interoperability solution, and how much does it cost on average? In an ideal world, what would interoperability between health data partners look like?

Providers: Do you consider yourself to have achieved full, partial or little/no health data interoperability between you and your partners? Are you happy with the results you’ve gotten from your interoperability efforts to date? What are the biggest benefits you’ve seen from achieving full or partial interoperability with other providers? Have you experienced any major failures in rolling out interoperability? If so, what damage did they do if any? Do you think interoperability is a prerequisite to delivering value-based care and/or population health management?

What topics are you looking forward to hearing about at #HIMSS18? What questions would you like asked? Share them in the comments and I’ll see what I can do to find answers.

CES Really Scared Me. Will HIMSS Make Me Feel Any Better?

Posted on February 22, 2018 I Written By

Mike Semel is a noted thought leader, speaker, blogger, and best-selling author of HOW TO AVOID HIPAA HEADACHES . He is the President and Chief Security Officer of Semel Consulting, focused on HIPAA and other compliance requirements; cyber security; and Business Continuity planning. Mike is a Certified Business Continuity Professional through the Disaster Recovery Institute, a Certified HIPAA Professional, Certified Security Compliance Specialist, and Certified Health IT Specialist. He has owned or managed technology companies for over 30 years; served as Chief Information Officer (CIO) for a hospital and a K-12 school district; and managed operations at an online backup company.

Are Consumer Health Care Products Accurate & Safe Enough for Your Healthcare?

At CES, the monstrous electronics show, I saw lots of consumer devices advertised for personal fitness and healthcare. There was even a Digital Health Summit, with a wide range of industry experts.

Some companies were promoting their ability to send data to healthcare providers. That’s scary, since there are no standards governing many of these devices.

A clear message from CES is that the divisions between ‘technology’ and ‘devices’ are diminishing. Alexa, Google Home, and Siri, won’t be tied to stand-alone devices for long. They will be integrated into a wide range of consumer products across a home network, your car, portable devices, and the Internet. It’s not a big leap of the imagination to think that you will be telling Alexa, in your refrigerator, to reset the alarm clock in your bedroom, for an early meeting. And that Alexa will be telling you that you gained a pound, and send that data to your doctor.

Considering the recent news about Amazon getting into healthcare, with Warren Buffet and JP Morgan, it’s logical to think that Amazon will be delivering our healthcare along with our packages. Will you get a colonoscopy notification from Amazon because someone orders a 50th birthday card for you? (Will they only use lubricant if you have Prime? Ok, that might have been a little harsh.)

Loud and clear from CES is the consumerization of healthcare, and it’s scary.

Will data from your consumer products be accurate enough for a health care provider to form a professional opinion?

Will your devices be safe from hacking and interference?

Who will be liable if something bad happens to you because your data wasn’t accurate, or was delayed in transmission?

Should there be a government or industry-based organization setting standards and certifying devices?

ACCURACY

Valencell makes biometric sensor chips for companies to use in their consumer products. They displayed stylish brand-name smart watches that imbed their biometric-sensor chips.

Valencell’s President, Steven LeBoeuf, said that there are no standards for consumer heart monitors. His chips are voluntarily lab-tested and certified for accuracy. He said that some of their competitors’ products can confuse a person’s steps, as they are walking or running, as a heartbeat.

While that might not matter too much to a person casually checking their own vitals, what will happen if incorrect data is sent upstream to your healthcare provider?

This diagram, produced by iHealth, a company that makes ‘consumer-friendly, mobile personal healthcare products that connect to the cloud’, clearly shows their expectation that your data will be communicated to hospitals.

iHealth aptly describes this as a Systematic Framework. Think about how many vendors will be involved in the system. Device manufacturers, chip manufacturers, software designers, programmers, computer companies, communication networks, Internet service providers, cloud services, and more, all before data gets to the hospital.

What if there is a failure? What happens to you if your healthcare is depending on a consumer device? Who is responsible for the security and accuracy of the data through the system? Wanna bet that everyone will be pointing their finger at someone else?

SAFETY

What will protect you from your devices? There are an increasing numbers of stories of consumer products and autonomous cars – the Internet of Things (IoT) – being hacked.

In August, 2017, the FDA issued a warning that a pacemaker was vulnerable to hackers who could remotely kill the battery or modify the performance of the pacemaker. Killing the battery could kill the patient. Remember that this recall occurred because a pacemaker is a medical device governed by the FDA, which doesn’t govern consumer healthcare products.

The Equifax breach, the Spectre and Meltdown flaws in computer microchips, and hackers hijacking baby monitors and surveillance cameras, all show the importance of being able to apply software and firmware patches and updates.

It took a long time for the government to require car companies to recall vehicles for safety problems. How many people will be hurt, or die, before consumer health care products get regulated?

LIABILITY

At CES, AIG Insurance presented this graphic of survey results showing who is liable for a driverless vehicle crash.

Imagine personal injury attorneys salivating over consumer health care product failures. Imagine new types of insurance coverage – or new types of policy exceptions – related to managing healthcare based on consumer product data.

STANDARDS & REGULATIONS

What’s the difference between a medical device and a consumer health care product? What defines a heart monitor? How accurate is a scale? How will a consumer health care product receive security patches? How will consumers be notified their health care products aren’t safe?

Do we want the federal government involved? In 1966, the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act required auto manufacturers to notify the government and consumers of safety defects, and recall vehicles. Could our dysfunctional Congress ever agree on a plan to regulate consumer health care products?

What about the industry policing itself? At his annual briefing at CES, electronics industry veteran Shelly Palmer made his case for a Self-Regulatory Organization (SRO) to create and enforce standards to protect consumers from risks associated with the Internet of Things.

The model for this could be PCI-DSS, the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards, that govern organizations that accept and process credit cards. This standard is self-regulated by a council founded by the credit card companies, and is not overseen by federal or state agencies. It covers credit card processing from end-to-end, from certifying the swipe device on the store’s counter all the way through the merchant processors and banks.

According to its website, the council “provides critical tools needed for implementation of the standards such as assessment and scanning qualifications, self-assessment questionnaires, training and education, and product certification programs.

If you are a healthcare professional, isn’t this the level of integrity and security you want for consumer products sending patient data to you?

Who would take on the responsibility, not to mention the liability, of policing consumer products sending data to healthcare organizations? The Consumer Technology Association (CTA), or the Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS)?

Will it take a disaster for us to find out?

Maybe I will find some answers at the HIMSS health IT conference. I sure hope so.

We’re Talking #HIMSS18 – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on February 20, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 2/23 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by the #HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors. Appropriately so, we’ll be talking about the upcoming HIMSS 2018 annual conference.

While HIMSS18 is an exciting chance to bring the various communities within health IT together in one place, the sheer volume of conference offerings, social media activity, and attendees can quickly make the experience exhausting. Social media, if navigated thoughtfully, can make this experience even more enriching – whether you are joining your colleagues in Las Vegas or following along from home.

That’s why the #HITsm and #HIMSS18 Twitter communities will be coming together to discuss:

  • Market and technology trends to be on the lookout for via social media and from the conference itself
  • Tips & best practices to effectively manage your (social media) conference experience
  • Networking opportunities and how to best connect with colleagues onsite and via social media

The HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors will be in attendance for this chat to help share some of their social media savvy and conference expertise to guide you in your planning. The topics we will cover include:

T1: What #HIMSS18 conversations would signal positive trajectory for IT closing gaps in health(care) disparities? #HITsm

T2: With so much happening at #HIMSS18, what tips do you have to stay on top of relevant conversations and announcements to come out of the conference? #HITsm

T3: What emerging technologies (some of which will highlighted at #HIMSS18) give you hope for making positive change in health and care delivery? #HITsm

T4: If you were to launch a social media campaign at HIMSS18 to unearth challenges or highlight successes for health IT, what would it be and why? #HITsm

T5: What are the biggest pitfalls #HIMSS18 exhibitors succumb to when driving booth engagement? What advice do you have for them? #HITsm

T6: Who are you looking to meet at #HIMSS18 or connect with via social media and why? #HITsm

What other planning tips or questions do you have? Share them and connect with others using the #HITsm + #HIMSS18 hashtags on Twitter.

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/2 – Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare
Hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora)

3/9 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Connecting and Meeting Up with People at #HIMSS18

Posted on February 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The 2018 HIMSS Annual Conference is just over 3 weeks away. For those not familiar with the event, it’s the behemoth of healthcare IT conferences which brings together 40,00-50,000 attendees and 1300 exhibitors at the Sands Convention Center in Las Vegas. It’s a week long healthcare IT extravaganza where you can connect with a wide variety of people from across the industry. However, it can no doubt be overwhelming for those attending for the first time (or even the 20th time for that matter).

If you talk to anyone who attends conferences regularly, they usually comment that the best part of the conference is spending time engaging with attendees and learning from their experience. This idea resonated so much with me that last year I decided to put together a series of meetups at HIMSS17. It was a smashing success of engagement, learning, and connection. After that success, we’re back with a wonderful schedule of meetups at HIMSS18 as well.

These meetups are open discussions. We generally feature a panel of influencers, thought leaders, and all-around interesting people who can make sure everyone gets a lot of value from the meetup. However, we want you to get involved as well. At these meetups, we encourage questions and comments from the audience so we can all learn and share with each other. We hope you’ll join us to share your insights, experiences, and perspectives and learn from others in the community.

So, without further ado, here’s our schedule of meetups at the HIMSS 2018 Annual Conference! Only the New Media Meetup requires registration. All of the rest you can just show up and attend.

Tuesday, March 6, 2018 HIMSS Meetups

Physician Communication Meetup
Tuesday, 3/6, 11:00-11:45 AM at the Voalte Booth #7131
Coordinating communication among care teams is a challenge every hospital faces. One of the most difficult aspects is how to manage physician communication. Bringing physicians into the care team communication loop can improve care, lower costs and increase efficiency. Join Danielle Siarri (@innonurse), Shahid Shah (@ShahidNShah), Angela Kauffman (@Voalte), Andrew Burchett, DO (@drandrew76), Candace Capps (@lbsolutions), and Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung) for a discussion about the challenges of physician communication and how to overcome them.

Consumer Solutions for a Positive, Healthier Patient Experience Meetup
Tuesday, 3/6, 12:50-1:35 PM at the MEDITECH Booth #1360

Do your patients feel connected to their physicians and other healthcare providers? Do they feel they are being listened to, and do they have access to the information they need to stay healthy and engaged? Join this meetup with Helen Waters (@HelenMEDITECH), Andrew Burchett, DO (@drandrew76), Max Stroud (@MMaxwellStroud), Lygeia Ricciardi (@Lygeia), Randy McCleese (@McCleeseRandy), and John Lynn (@techguy) where we’ll discuss how the MEDITECH patient portal and MHealth Apps keep patients informed and connected using features like direct appointment booking, provider messaging, integration with wearables, online questionnaires, and more. We’ll also talk about embedded video visits and how they provide patients with a personal and convenient means of interacting with their own physicians.

Data Hygiene in Healthcare: The First Step to Getting Value Out of Your Data Meetup
Tuesday, 3/6, 2:00-2:45 PM at the DellEMC Booth #3613

Digital transformation is happening in healthcare. With digitization, comes automation. With automation comes more applications. With more applications, comes more data. ‘Dirty data’ might cost you more than you realize…especially when it’s stored in legacy applications that are not managed well. Join the discussion with David Dimond (@NextGenHIT), Dan Trott (@DanTrottDell), Geeta Nayyar, MD (@gnayyar), Linda Stotsky (@EMRAnswers), Michael Joseph (@HealthData4All), James Lowey (@loweyj), Dr. Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1), Michael Archuleta (@Michael81082), and John Lynn (@techguy) and share your insights into this important topic.

HIMSS Social Media Ambassador Meetup
Tuesday, 3/6, 3:00-3:45 PM at the HIMSS Spot, Level 2, Lobby C

We’re honored that two of Healthcare Scene’s bloggers, @colin_hung and @coherencemed, were selected as 2 of 20 HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors. This is a select group of some of the most influential people in healthcare IT social media. This meetup organized by HIMSS will bring together the 20 social media ambassadors to talk about insights into healthcare IT, HIMSS18, and social media.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 HIMSS Meetups

Data Innovation: Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare – it’s happening… Meetup
Wednesday, 3/7, 11:00-11:45 AM at the DellEMC Booth #3613

It’s no secret, the healthcare industry has an (over) abundance of data. There are lots of mergers/acquisitions and consolidations taking place in the industry which only complicates matters and intensifies the playing field. There is likely a ton of analysis that’s not currently being done that could potentially provide better insights and results for healthcare organizations—their doctors, researchers, and patients. Now that we have the data, how do we make it useful? How can we deploy machine learning and artificial intelligence technologies into driving better results in a healthcare environment? How do you take the data and make it actionable? We invite you to join Geeta Nayyar, MD (@gnayyar), Dr. Nick van Terheyden (@drnic1), James Lowey (@loweyj), Michael Archuleta (@Michael81082), and John Lynn (@techguy) to discuss this hot topic.

#HITsm and #hcldr Picture and Meetup
Wednesday, 3/7, 12:15-12:45 PM (or however long people hang out) in the Sands Lobby downstairs by the large HIMSS sign/statue

This year we decided to keep things really simple for our #HITsm and #hcldr meetup at HIMSS 2018. Join us by the massive HIMSS letters/statue/sign to take a community picture with the sign and then mix and mingle with members of the #HITsm and #hcldr communities. We’ll plan to take the picture about 12:30 and then the rest of the time we’ll just enjoy seeing old friends, meeting new ones, and finally meeting some people who feel like old friends that we’re just meeting for the first time.

Finding the Right Mix of Human and Tech in a Unified Communication Strategy Meetup
Wednesday, 3/7, 1:00-1:45 PM at the Stericycle Communication Solutions Booth #859

Creating an effective unified communication strategy in healthcare requires an effective balance between human and tech.  Do you prefer to call and schedule an appointment or schedule one online?  The challenge in healthcare is the answer to that question depends on the patient.  Sometimes a phone call is necessary while other times the ability to schedule an appointment online is much more convenient.  Join Sarah Bennight (@SarahBennight), Janae Sharp (@CoherenceMed), Brian Mack (@BFMack), Melody Smith (@TheSameMel), and John Lynn (@techguy) as we discuss an effective unified communication strategy that incorporates both humans and technology.

New Media Meetup
Wednesday, 3/7, 6:00-8:00 PM at Senor Frogs (Inside Treasure Island Casino across the street from Venetian)
This is the 9th annual New Media Meetup at HIMSS. This event brings together most of the influential people in Healthcare IT social media and a wide variety of influencers, journalists, bloggers and readers as well. Plus, thanks to our sponsor, CareCognitics, we’ll have food, drinks, a DJ, and some killer giveaways. This event does require you to register to attend, so please be sure to register if you plan to join us.

Thursday, March 8, 2018 HIMSS Meetups

How AI Will Impact the Patient Experience Meetup
Thursday, 3/8, 10:00-10:45 AM at the Pegasystems Booth #11336

We’re seeing AI (Artificial Intelligence) applied throughout healthcare, but one of the most exciting areas we’re seeing AI make a difference is in the patient experience.  What do patients expect?  How can AI be used to meet patients expectations?  What are the benefits and challenges of using AI with patients?  Join Susan Taylor (@pega), Chuck Webster, MD (@wareFLO), Tamara StClaire (@drstclaire), Prashant Natarajan (@natarpr), and Colin Hung (@Colin_Hung) as we look at the impact AI will have on the patient experience.

How’s that look for an incredible schedule of HIMSS 2018 meetups? We can’t wait to welcome you to Vegas and enjoy incredible engagement and knowledge sharing with those of you in the Healthcare IT and HIMSS18 community.

Voalte, MEDITECH, DellEMC, Stericycle Communication Solutions, Pegasystems, and CareCognitics are all sponsors of Healthcare Scene .