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The Required Shift in How Patients View Wearables

Posted on September 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

We’ve all seen the explosive growth that’s occurred in the wearables market. The most extraordinary part of the wearables explosion is that the majority of wearables growth has been in the healthcare space. The problem we now see in healthcare is that most people don’t look at wearables as a disease management tool as much as they see them as lifestyle tools. This was described really well by Megan Williams on the Samsung Insights blog:

Perhaps the most challenging part of meeting that desire [Physician Access to Patients’ Lives and Health] is the fact that patients mostly view wearables as an aid in lifestyle improvement instead of disease management. The task of helping patients understand that wearables are about much more than weight loss will fall squarely on the shoulders of providers.

Patients have traditionally shown a preference for lifestyle apps including fitness, nutrition and heart rate aids, and have been much slower to adopt disease management tools, even as chronic disease remains a burden on healthcare as a whole. Encouraging the use of a broader range of wearables, digital tools and apps will be a challenge for any provider.

Changing habits and perceptions is always a challenge. However, it’s also a great opportunity.

No one would argue that today’s wearables are more than novelty items that may have some impact on your lifestyle (fitness, nutrition, etc). That’s largely because the initial wearables were designed around those retail areas of the market. It’s much easier to create a retail wearable device than to create a disease management focused healthcare device.

As the healthcare wearables market matures so will patients expectations around the benefits they can receive from those wearables. I think there are two main keys to development of wearables as true healthcare devices: Depth of Tracking and Connection to Providers.

Depth of Tracking
I’ve argued for a while now that all the various fitness trackers were not clinically relevant. I still believe that today, but I also believe that wearables like the various fitness trackers will start tracking us in ways that are clinically relevant. That just takes a lot longer to develop.

Whether it’s new trackers that screen for sleep apnea or ECGs that monitor our heart, we’re seeing more and more wearable devices monitoring data that’s more clinically relevant than the number of steps you’ve taken. This trend will continue. As wearables more deeply track various parts of the human body, the opportunities to understand your health and improve your health will follow along with it. This will provide doctors the impetus to request access to your wearable data.

The deep data these wearables will provide will challenge the tried and true beliefs healthcare holds so dearly today. That can be scary for some, but is also very exciting.

Connection to Providers
While wearables will provide the data, we’ll still want to consult a healthcare provider to understand the data and to create a plan of action based on that data. At least in the foreseeable future, our health will depend on collaboration with healthcare providers as opposed to a replacement of healthcare providers. This will be particularly true as the type of data our wearables collect gets more complicated. Understanding your step chart is quite different than understanding your ECG.

In order to facilitate this collaboration, our wearables will have to be connected to our care providers. Note that I said care providers and not doctors. In some cases it might be our doctor, but in other cases it could be a nurse, care manager, social worker, or some other care provider. I’m hopeful that we eventually reach the point of a true care team that collaborates on our health. That’s a far cry from where most of our healthcare is today, but that is the hope.

If we can solve these two wearable challenges: Deeper Data and Connected Providers, then we’ll be well on our way to changing how patients view wearables. This shift won’t happen over night, but I believe it will happen a lot quicker than most people imagine.

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare.

Growth of the Wearables Market Dominated by Healthcare

Posted on September 21, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

wearable-market-growth

This chart illustrates an incredible explosion in the wearables market and illustrates how it’s likely to continue to grow for years to come. The big takeaway for me is how healthcare totally dominates these graphs. The two biggest growth markets for wearable are “Healthcare” and “Sports/Activity Trackers.” Many would argue that Sports/Activity trackers should be included in healthcare. That’s amazing.

The only other wearable that gets reasonably close is the smart watches, but even those could be argued as healthcare devices as well. Sure, they do a lot more, but they all have some sort of health component to them as well.

I’m going to point to these graphs from now on when I talk about the impact of wearables on healthcare. Although, I guess I could also say that the wearables market is largely healthcare. I’m excited by this continued growth and I still think we’re just getting started on what will be possible. Watch out for wearables major impact on healthcare. I think it’s inevitable.

The Promise of Wearables for Healthcare

Posted on June 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In a recent interview I did with Dr. Rhew, Chief Medical Officer of Samsung, and Dr. Nick, CMO of Dell, we got this great insight from Dr. Rhew on the promise of wearables for healthcare (only takes 45 seconds):

It’s worth listening to the full discussion with Dr. Rhew and Dr. Nick so you have context, but I love how he framed the promise of wearables for healthcare. I especially like how he talks about these devices just being integrated into our lifestyle.

The challenge with this promise is that many of the current wearables have fallen short. They don’t integrate well with our lifestyle. They’re a pain to connect to get the data (although, that’s gotten better). The data they collect has questionable accuracy. The data they collect isn’t clinically relevant. I could keep going, but you get the idea.

While many of the wearables have fallen short, that’s a necessary part of the learning process. We’re going through a wearable revolution and that requires a product evolution. Many of the things we see as failings today will be considered laughable in the future.

Like Dr. Rhew, I think the promise of wearables is extremely exciting for healthcare. The integration of wearables into your lifestyle is happening. It’s not going to happen overnight, but each of these products will lay the groundwork for wearables that will become invisible to our day to day life.

Learning More About Samsung’s Work in Healthcare and #HIMSS16

Posted on February 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

As we head into the 2016 HIMSS Annual conference, Healthcare Scene sat down with David Rhew, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung. In our discussion we talk about Samsung’s role in healthcare and the HIMSS16 conference. We also talk about a wide variety of topics including: the digital hospital, the connected home, BYOD, mobile device security, and wearables to name a few. No doubt Samsung is playing a bigger and bigger role in healthcare. Learn more in this video conversation embedded below:

After talking about Samsung Healthcare’s plans and expectations for the HIMSS16 conference, David Rhew, M.D. and Healthcare Scene opened up the floor for other live viewers to join the conversation in what we call the “After Party.”

In this discussion we talk about the challenge of standards and mobile device interoperability and then we were joined by Dr. James Legan and Dr. Charles Webster who share some first hand experiences and insights into how the right medical devices can dramatically change the physician and the patient healthcare experience along with Dr. Rhew sharing his experiences. Find out all the details in the video embedded below:

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare