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Top 5 Ways to Create a Stellar Patient Experience

Posted on August 13, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Bennight, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Patient experience has always been something healthcare delivery organizations should strive to improve. However, in the past couple of years, patient experience has received a necessary focus as health consumers are presented with more choice, transparency, and data to navigate their healthcare journey. But with so many choices available, what can health providers do to drive loyalty?

I recently had to schedule a visit for my annual mammogram, a much dreaded experience for most women. I’m lucky to have many imaging options around me, making it easy to get in on a day that was convenient for me. However, the choice was very simple after the exemplary experience I received last year. One facility in particular made me into a loyal patient, and they did so in five key ways.

1. Convenience of access: Consumer-centric businesses like Amazon and Starbucks have made it so seamless and easy to get what you need from them when you need it, that it makes waiting in healthcare more painful than it used to be. Now, we expect to handle business transactions on our own terms and to receive immediate results. Even Amazon Prime’s two-day shipping wasn’t enough for us, and now we have Amazon Now. When it was time to schedule with the facility, it was simple to connect and get care when convenient for me. They offer online scheduling, which enabled me to browse open appointments and choose an option that fit my busy schedule. They have a phone number as well if you prefer to schedule that way, but I prefer doing most business transaction from my phone.

2. Patient-first in clinic experience: Everything at the facility was set up to make something no woman really wants to do, an enjoyable experience. I was greeted with a warm smile when I walked in and promptly taken back to the changing rooms. Their rooms are finely decorated with warm lighting and comfortable dressing rooms. I never sat idle for more than 10 minutes. They have even taken the extra step to provide lockers for your personal belongings with the names of famous amazing women so you can remember where your belongings are. I chose to be Eleanor Roosevelt one year, and Jane Austin this year.

3. Putting data in the patients’ hands: Both times I have been in for a screening, I receive my secure results within 24 to 48 hours and they send the results to both my OB/Gyn and my primary care provider. Armed with information contained in my profile, I can choose to have a more in depth conversation with my care providers regarding the risks and results, or I can keep them and compare year after year. Knowledge and education are the first two steps in patients having the ability to manage their health.

4. Proactive engagement in care: Patients can be very forgetful (especially when managing the care of four additional family members). If there is something I need to do in order to take better care of myself, it’s better to be proactive and ping me instead of assuming I’ve got it covered. This facility let me know several months in advance that it was time to reschedule. I knew the exact date I was eligible per my insurance, so it made it easy to take the best step to keep on top of my health.

5. Ease of doing business: No one wants to spend hours filling out paper forms. When looking for a repeat appointment for this year, I saw that there was a clinic closer to my office. I arrived a few minutes early to fill out the insurance forms since I scheduled online and there was no place for me to put the card information. When I walked in and gave my name at sign in, they had everything: my address, insurance, birthdate, records from the last visit at a different facility. This is imperative for healthcare organizations to prioritize as mergers and acquisitions mean multiple EHRs, billing systems, and contact centers. The experience and ease of doing business with your team before and after care will affect patient loyalty. Make it easier to do the small things, and watch your patient satisfaction increase.

The facility has gone to great lengths to ensure their patient experience is above par and their efforts have definitely paid off. And they will have my loyalty for it as long as they serve my area. Their mission states:

“Our promise is to provide an exceptional experience, exceptionally accurate results, and Peace of Mind to everyone we serve. Our purpose is to be the National Leader in Mammography and imaging services, helping patients achieve and maintain optimal health.”

What is your promise to your patients? Is your number one to provide an exceptional experience? Are you meeting the above five areas of the patient experience beyond the clinical face to face interaction? What are some additional ways you ensure the best experiences for everyone in your care?

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

The Human Side of Healthcare Interactions

Posted on March 19, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Bennight, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

The week after HIMSS is certainly a rest and reflect (and catch up) time period. So much information is crammed into five short days that hopefully fuel innovation and change in our industry for the next year. We hear a lot of buzzwords during HIMSS, and as marketers in general. This year my biggest area of post-HIMSS reflection is on the human side of healthcare. Often, as health IT professionals, we can be so enamored with the techie side of things that we lose sight of what adding more automation does to our daily interactions.

The digital revolution has certainly made life easier. We can connect online, schedule an appointment, Uber to our destination, order groceries online, and pick them up on our way home with limited interactions with any real human. While the convenience for many far outweighs any downside, the digital world is causing its own health concern: loneliness.

Research by Holt-Lunstad found that “weak social connections carry a health risk that is more harmful than not exercising, twice as harmful as obesity, and is comparable to smoking 15 cigarettes a day or being an alcoholic.” But the digitization of our lives is reducing the amount of human interaction and our reasons to connect in real life. I keep hearing the phrase “we are more connected than ever, but we are feeling more alone”.  How do we avoid feeding another health issue, such as depression, while making healthcare more accessible, cost-effective, and convenient?

In healthcare communications, I want both technological convenience and warm, caring human interaction depending on what my need is at a given moment. If I need to schedule an appointment, I’d better have the option to schedule online. But in the middle of the night, when my child has a 104F fever and I call my doctor, I want a real person to talk and ask questions to, who will listen to the state my child is in and make the best recommendation for their health.

I had the privilege of discussing this balance of human and tech in a meet up at HIMSS last week. We learned that my colleague and friend learned the gender of her baby via a portal while waiting patiently for the doctor’s office to call. This is pushing the line of being ok in my opinion. But what if it was something worse, such as a cancer diagnosis or something equally scary? Is that ok for you? Wouldn’t you prefer and need someone to guide you through the result and talk about next steps?

As we add even more channels to communicate between health facility and patient, we need to take a look at the patient interaction lifecycle and personalize it to their needs. We should address the areas where automation might move faster than the human connections we initiate to ensure we are always in step with our tools and technology. Healthcare relationships rely on confidence and loyalty, and these things aren’t so easily built into an app. Online interactions will never replace the human, day-to-day banter and touch we all need. But I believe that technology can create efficiency that allows my doctor to spend more quality time with me during my visits and better engage me in my health.

So the question stands: how do you think the healthcare industry can find the right tech and human balance?

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Oh How Easily We Forget

Posted on December 23, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently playing ultimate frisbee and a pharmacist from out of town came to play with us since they were in Las Vegas attending a conference. After a bit of discussion he learned that I was a healthcare IT blogger and so we had a short discussion about the benefits of technology in healthcare. During our discussion he said the following that really hit me:

“Carbon copy… it’s a nightmare.” -Pharmacist

That’s right. One of the hospitals that sends him prescriptions still uses carbon copy to write their prescriptions. The pharmacist then went on to tell me, “If you think reading handwriting is hard to read, try reading it through double carbon copy.”

For many of us, including myself, Christmas is just around the corner. We’ll be spending time with family and friends. We’ll give and get presents. We’ll eat Christmas cookies. We’ll sing Christmas songs. The break can be an extremely enjoyable time for many. However, so many of us (yes, that includes me) just take it for granted.

I think that’s kind of like the benefits technology can and has provided healthcare. How much easier is it to find a chart in an EHR? How much easier is it to read typed out notes versus the hieroglyphics that some doctors called handwriting? How much easier is it to print 2 prescriptions or just ePrescribe a prescription than to use a double carbon copy? I could go on and on, but you get the point.

Both in healthcare IT and in life, we often take so many things for granted once they become a constant in our lives. This holiday weekend I’m planning to slow down, breathe deeply, and appreciate the good things in life. There are many regardless of your situation or circumstances. Taking a little time to remember will help us not forget all the things we have to be grateful for in this world. Let’s put aside our challenges this weekend and pick them back up on Monday.

Happy Holidays to everyone! Thanks for always helping me to remember all the incredible things in my life.

Technology is Just a Tool, It’s Not The Solution to Healthcare’s Problems

Posted on June 16, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today I’m dipping my toes in an area that’s not familiar with me. I’m attending the AHIP Institute conference in Las Vegas. For those not familiar with AHIP, it’s a coming together of the health plans across the US. This group is particularly interesting when you remember that most healthcare providers are also health plans today. In fact, we’re quickly seeing the merging of healthcare providers and payers.

The conference has just begun, but it’s already clear to me that there’s a general tone that technology is going to play a major role in the future of healthcare delivery. What also seems to clear to me is that most of these people aren’t sure what role technology will play.

The problem I think many of these people have is that they think that technology can be implemented to solve all their problems. That’s not how it works. Technology in and of itself is not a solution to most problems. Technology is just a tool. How you use that tool can be effective or not. Plus, you have to make sure that you have the right tool. If you need to drive a nail into a piece of wood, a screwdriver doesn’t do you much good.

I’d also add that even if you have the right tool, you still need the right plan. If you’re trying to build a table and you have the blueprints for a chair, then you’re not going to get the result you want. My gut tells me that most of these people are overwhelmed by the operational requirements of their day to day job and so they don’t have any time to actually explore what solutions are out there for their problems.

I agree with those at AHIP that technology shows a lot of promise. However, we need to spend a lot more time making sure we’re using the right solution at the right time in the right place. That’s a challenge we haven’t quite solved.

Is Healthcare Missing Out on 21st Century Technology?

Posted on July 31, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This tweet struck me as I consider some of the technologies at the core of healthcare. As a patient, many of the healthcare technologies in use are extremely disappointing. As an entrepreneur I’m excited by the possibilities that newer technologies can and will provide healthcare.

I understand the history of healthcare technology and so I understand much of why healthcare organizations are using some of the technologies they do. In many cases, there’s just too much embedded knowledge in the older technology. In other cases, many believe that the older technologies are “more reliable” and trusted than newer technologies. They argue that healthcare needs to have extremely reliable technologies. The reality of many of these old technologies is that they don’t stop someone from purchasing the software (yet?). So, why should these organizations change?

I’m excited to see how the next 5-10 years play out. I see an opportunity for a company to leverage newer technologies to disrupt some of the dominant companies we see today. I reminded of this post on my favorite VC blog. The reality is that software is a commodity and so it can be replaced by newer and better technology and displace the incumbent software.

I think we’ve seen this already. Think about MEDITECH’s dominance and how Epic is having its hey day now. It does feel like software displacement in healthcare is a little slower than other industries, but it still happens. I’m interested to see who replaces Epic on the top of the heap.

I do offer one word of caution. As Fred says in the blog post above, one way to create software lock in is to create a network of users that’s hard to replicate. Although, he also suggested that data could be another way to make your software defensible. I’d describe it as data lock-in and not just data. We see this happening all over the EHR industry. Many EHR vendors absolutely lock in the EHR data in a way that makes it really challenging to switch EHR software. If exchange of EHR data becomes wide spread, that’s a real business risk to these EHR software companies.

While it’s sometimes disappointing to look at the old technology that powers healthcare, it also presents a fantastic opportunity to improve our system. It is certainly not easy to sell a new piece of software to healthcare. In fact, you’ll likely see the next disruptive software come from someone with deep connections inside healthcare partnered with a progressive IT expert.

Health IT Hazards, Selecting the Right EHR, and Withings Wireless Scale – Around Healthcare Scene

Posted on December 2, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Hospital EMR and EHR

Health IT Stands Out In Health Technology Hazards List

The Top 10 Health Technology Hazards list was recently released by ECRI. And this year, two of the hazards that made the list are health IT related – patient/data mismatches in EHRs and other HIT systems, and, interoperability failures with medical devices and health IT systems. Anne Zeiger predicts that more HIT issues will top this list in the future.

Patients Accessing Online Medical Records Use More Services

A new study revealed something interesting — patients who use online access to medical records are likely to use more clinical services than those who do not. The Journal of the American Medical Association drew this conclusion after studying members of Kaiser. Kaiser has had a patient portal in place since 2006, which made it an ideal candidate for this study.

EMR and EHR

10 Tips for Selecting the Right EHR

In the market for a new EHR? Or perhaps just implementing one? This post highlights 10 tips on selecting the right EHR for your practice, as presented by Insight Data Group. Some of the suggestions include making sure the EHR is easy to use and customized, and use the government’s money to pay for your EHR.

Meaningful Healthcare IT News

Social and Mobile Continue to Converge in Healthcare

An interesting infographic is shown and discussed in this post. It is called “How Health Consumers Engage Online,” and reveals some interesting facts about the digital and health world. According to it, more people in the United States own a smart phone than a tooth brush, and 23 percent of people use social media to follow the health experiences of a friend. This definitely presents some fascinating data that is worth reading.

Smart Phone Health Care

New Withings Wireless Internet Scale Hits the Market

A new scale was recently released, and it does more than just tell a person how much they weigh. It tracks numerous variables, including BMI, and can be synced to various mHealth apps. There is also an app that goes along with the scale as well. It is a bit pricey at over $100, but it definitely “tips the scales” when it comes to scales.

Smart Phone Enabled Thermometer Approved By FDA

The “Raiing” is the newest in smart phone technology. It’s a high-tech, yet easy-to-use, thermometer, designed for iOS devices. It is placed under the armpit, and can actually track a person’s temperature over time. If a temperature reaches a certain number, an alarm will go off on the connected smart phone. This can help give parent’s peace of mind, as a sick child sleeps.

Clinician Adoption of Healthcare Tech, Patient Satisfaction, and Safety: #HITsm Chat Highlights

Posted on November 3, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Topic One: What are keys for successful, sustained clinician adoption of healthcare technology?

Topic Two: How can we improve patient satisfaction? #patientexperience

 

Topic Three: What is #healthIT’s role in patient safety?

 

Topic Four:  When is a low-tech solution better than high-tech?