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Value Based Care: Successes, Challenges, and Changes – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/16 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Matt Fisher (@Matt_R_Fisher) on the topic of “Value Based Care: Successes, Challenges, and Changes”.

The transition of the healthcare industry from fee for service to value based care (or alternative payment methodologies) garners significant attention from regulators, providers, vendors and many others in the industry. To frame the discussion, value based care generally refers to payment for quality, or in other words trying to focus on outcomes. The change represents a substantial shift in the approach to paying for healthcare services in the United States.

While value based care refers to payment for quality as an overarching concept, there are a multitude of means of structuring payment arrangements for quality. Examples include capitated agreements, bundled payments, pay for quality, and others. Common themes around the structures are not paying based on the volume of services, which arguably drives collaborations to break down siloes.

With a few years of value based care under the belt, how have efforts gone and where are those efforts heading? Join the chat to weigh in with your thoughts.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Which value based care models have been successful to date and how do you define success? #HITsm

T2: How are new and/or developing #healthIT tools helping or hindering the ability to transition to value based care? #HITsm

T3: What are misperceptions that have developed around value based care models and how are they inaccurate? #HITsm

T4: What role do Medicare and Medicaid programs have in pushing the industry to value based care and how does the recommitment of CMS impact the change? #HITsm

T5: What changes do you see on the horizon for value based care programs? #HITsm

Bonus: What type of value based care program not currently existing should be developed or implemented? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/23 – No Chat – Thanksgiving Break

11/30 – The Global Impact of Health IT
Hosted by Vanessa Carter (@_FaceSA)

12/7 – TBD
Hosted by Michelle Currie (@mshlcurrie)

12/14 – TBD
Hosted by Claire Pfarr (@clairepfarr) from @OneViewHC and the @Savvy_Coop Community

12/21 – Holiday Break

12/28 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

AI in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 6, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/9 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jon White @technursejon on the topic of “AI in Healthcare”.

The idea of Artificial Intelligence (AI) isn’t new. We’ve seen robots and intelligent computers in film and on television for decades, and read about them in science fiction novels for even longer. As the processing power of computers and computing devices has taken off, and more and more data is captured from all facets of our lives, the science fiction from our parents’ generation is becoming the reality of today.

Though we may be far from witnessing the androids popularized in film and TV, there are elements of AI that are currently in use in many industries. AI has the potential to drastically change the way we live and work.

In this #HITsm chat, Jon White (@TechNurseJon) will lead a discussion on AI in healthcare, exploring its potential and pitfalls.

Check out the questions for this week’s #HITsm chat below.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Artificial intelligence (AI) is a broad term, covering a variety of technologies. What does “AI” mean to you? How do you define it? #HITsm

T2: What impacts can AI have on healthcare, and how soon do you expect to see it? #HITsm

T3: What impacts do you see AI having on the healthcare and health IT workforce? #HITsm

T4: How can AI be integrated with other technologies to improve the delivery and effectiveness of healthcare? Where would you like to see it integrated? #HITsm

T5: AI relies on a significant amount of data. For many applications in healthcare, much of that data is derived from patient records. How will privacy concerns affect adoption? #HITsm

Bonus: What barriers are there to full-scale AI adoption in the healthcare environment? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/16 – Value Based Care: Successes, Challenges, and Changes
Hosted by Matt Fisher (@Matt_R_Fisher)

11/23 – No Chat – Thanksgiving Break

11/30 – The Global Impact of Health IT
Hosted by Vanessa Carter (@_FaceSA)

12/7 – TBD
Hosted by Michelle Currie (@mshlcurrie)

12/14 – TBD
Hosted by Claire Pfarr (@clairepfarr) from @OneViewHC and the @Savvy_Coop Community

12/21 – Holiday Break

12/28 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on February 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 3/2 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora) on the topic “Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare.”

Machine learning is hitting a furious pace in the consumer world, where AI estimates how long your food will take to arrive and targets you with the purchases you can’t resist. This week, we’ll discuss the implications of this technology as we translate it to the healthcare ecosystem.

Current machine learning topics of interest to healthcare range from adaptive and behavior-based care delivery pathways to the regulation of so-called “black box” systems those that cannot easily explain the reasons with which they made a prediction.

Please join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we discuss the following questions:

T1: The Machine Learning community is currently discussing FAT: Fairness, Accountability, & Transparency. What does this mean in healthIT? #HITsm

T2: How can machine learning integrate naturally in clinical and patient facing workflows? #HITsm

T3: What consumer applications of machine learning are best suited for transition to the healthcare setting? #HITsm

T4: The FDA regulates software AS a medical device and IN a medical device. How do you envision this distinction today, and do you foresee it changing? #HITsm

T5: What successes have you seen in healthcare machine learning? Are particular care settings better suited for ML? Where do you see that alignment? #HITsm

Bonus: Is there a place for machine learning black box predictions? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
3/9 – HIMSS Break – No #HITsm Chat

3/16 – TBD

3/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Machine Learning, Data Science, AI, Deep Learning, and Statistics – It’s All So Confusing

Posted on November 30, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems like these days every healthcare IT company out there is saying they’re doing machine learning, AI, deep learning, etc. So many companies are using these terms that they’ve started to lose meaning. The problem is that people are using these labels regardless of whether they really apply. Plus, we all have different definitions for these terms.

As I search to understand the differences myself, I found this great tweet from Ronald van Loon that looks at this world and tries to better define it:

In that tweet, Ronald also links to an article that looks at some of the differences. I liked this part he took from Quora:

  • AI (Artificial intelligence) is a subfield of computer science, that was created in the 1960s, and it was (is) concerned with solving tasks that are easy for humans, but hard for computers. In particular, a so-called Strong AI would be a system that can do anything a human can (perhaps without purely physical things). This is fairly generic, and includes all kinds of tasks, such as planning, moving around in the world, recognizing objects and sounds, speaking, translating, performing social or business transactions, creative work (making art or poetry), etc.
  • Machine learning is concerned with one aspect of this: given some AI problem that can be described in discrete terms (e.g. out of a particular set of actions, which one is the right one), and given a lot of information about the world, figure out what is the “correct” action, without having the programmer program it in. Typically some outside process is needed to judge whether the action was correct or not. In mathematical terms, it’s a function: you feed in some input, and you want it to to produce the right output, so the whole problem is simply to build a model of this mathematical function in some automatic way. To draw a distinction with AI, if I can write a very clever program that has human-like behavior, it can be AI, but unless its parameters are automatically learned from data, it’s not machine learning.
  • Deep learning is one kind of machine learning that’s very popular now. It involves a particular kind of mathematical model that can be thought of as a composition of simple blocks (function composition) of a certain type, and where some of these blocks can be adjusted to better predict the final outcome.

Is that clear for you now? Would you suggest different definitions? Where do you see people using these terms correctly and where do you see them using them incorrectly?

Searching EMR For Risk-Related Words Can Improve Care Coordination

Posted on September 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Though healthcare organizations are working on the problem, they’re still not as good at care coordination as they should be. It’s already an issue and will only get worse under value-based care schemes, in which the ability to coordinate care effectively could be a critical issue for providers.

Admittedly, there’s no easy way to solve care coordination problems, but new research suggests that basic health IT tools might be able to help. The researchers found that digging out important words from EMRs can help providers target patients needing extra care management and coordination.

The article, which appears in JMIR Medical Informatics, notes that most care coordination programs have a blind spot when it comes to identifying cases demanding extra coordination. “Care coordination programs have traditionally focused on medically complex patients, identifying patients that qualify by analyzing formatted clinical data and claims data,” the authors wrote. “However, not all clinically relevant data reside in claims and formatted data.”

For example, they say, relying on formatted records may cause providers to miss psychosocial risk factors such as social determinants of health, mental health disorder, and substance abuse disorders. “[This data is] less amenable to rapid and systematic data analyses, as these data are often not collected or stored as formatted data,” the authors note.

To address this issue, the researchers set out to identify psychosocial risk factors buried within a patient’s EHR using word recognition software. They used a tool known as the Queriable Patient Inference Dossier (QPID) to scan EHRs for terms describing high-risk conditions in patients already in care coordination programs.

After going through the review process, the researchers found 22 EHR-available search terms related to psychosocial high-risk status. When they were able to find nine or more of these terms in the patient’s EHR, it predicted that a patient would meet criteria for participation in a care coordination program. Presumably, this approach allowed care managers and clinicians to find patients who hadn’t been identified by existing care coordination outreach efforts.

I think this article is valuable, as it outlines a way to improve care coordination programs without leaping over tall buildings. Obviously, we’re going to see a lot more emphasis on harvesting information from structured data, tools like artificial intelligence, and natural language processing. That makes sense. After all, these technologies allow healthcare organizations to enjoy both the clear organization of structured data and analytical options available when examining pure data sets. You can have your cake and eat it too.

Obviously, we’re going to see a lot more emphasis on harvesting information from structured data, tools like artificial intelligence and natural language processing. That makes sense. After all, these technologies allow healthcare organizations to enjoy both the clear organization of structured data and analytical options available when examining pure data sets. You can have your cake and eat it too.

Still, it’s good to know that you can get meaningful information from EHRs using a comparatively simple tool. In this case, parsing patient medical records for a couple dozen keywords helped the authors find patients that might have otherwise been missed. This can only be good news.

Yes, there’s no doubt we’ll keep on pushing the limits of predictive analytics, healthcare AI, machine learning and other techniques for taming wild databases. In the meantime, it’s good to know that we can make incremental progress in improving care using simpler tools.

More About Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 8, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/11 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Prashant Natarajan (@natarpr) on the topic of “More About Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare.” Be sure to also check out Prashant’s HIMSS best selling book Demystifying Big Data and Machine Learning for Healthcare to learn about his perspectives and insights into the topic.

Healthcare transformation requires us to continually look at new and better ways to manage insights – both within and outside the organization today. Increasingly, the ability to glean and operationalize new insights efficiently as a byproduct of an organization’s day-to-day operations is becoming vital to hospitals and health systems ability to survive and prosper. One of the long-standing challenges in healthcare informatics has been the ability to deal with the sheer variety and volume of disparate healthcare data and the increasing need to derive veracity and value out of it.

The potential for big data in healthcare – especially given the trends discussed earlier is as bright as any other industry. The benefits that big data analytics, AI, and machine learning can provide for healthier patients, happier providers, and cost-effective care are real. The future of precision medicine, population health management, clinical research, and financial performance will include an increased role for machine-analyzed insights, discoveries, and all-encompassing analytics.

This chat explores participants thoughts and feelings about the future of artificial intelligence in the healthcare industry and how healthcare organizations might leverage artificial intelligence to discover new business value, use cases, and knowledge.

Note: For purpose of this chat, “artificial intelligence” can mean predictive analytics, machine learning, big data analytics, natural language processing and contextually intelligent agents.

Reference Materials

Questions we will explore in this week’s #HITsm chat include:
T1: What words or short phrases convey your current thoughts & feelings about ‘artificial intelligence’ in the healthcare space? #HITsm #AI

T2: What are big & small steps healthcare can take to leverage big data & machine learning for population health & personalized care? #HITsm

T3: Which areas of healthcare might be most positively impacted by artificial intelligence? #HITsm #AI

T4: What are some areas within healthcare that will likely NOT be improved or replaced by artificial intelligence? #HITsm #AI

T5: What lessons learned from early days of ‘advanced analytics’ must not be forgotten as use of artificial intelligence expands? #HITsm #AI

Bonus: How is your organization preparing for the application and use of artificial intelligence in healthcare? #HITsm #AI

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/18 – Diversity in HIT
Hosted by Jeanmarie Loria (@JeanmarieLoria) from @advizehealth

8/25 – Consumer Data Liquidity – The Road So Far, The Road Ahead
Hosted by Greg Meyer (@Greg_Meyer93)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Hands-On Guidance for Data Integration in Health: The CancerLinQ Story

Posted on June 15, 2017 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Institutions throughout the health care field are talking about data sharing and integration. Everyone knows that improved care, cost controls, and expanded research requires institutions who hold patient data to safely share it. The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s CancerLinQ, one of the leading projects analyzing data analysis to find new cures, has tackled data sharing with a large number of health providers and discovered just how labor-intensive it is.

CancerLinQ fosters deep relationships and collaborations with the clinicians from whom it takes data. The platform turns around results from analyzing the data quickly and to give the clinicians insights they can put to immediate use to improve the care of cancer patients. Issues in collecting, storing, and transmitting data intertwine with other discussion items around cancer care. Currently, CancerLinQ isolates the data from each institution, and de-identifies patient information in order to let it be shared among participating clinicians. CancerLinQ LLC is a wholly-owned nonprofit subsidiary of ASCO, which has registered CancerLinQ as a trademark.

CancerLinQ logo

Help from Jitterbit

In 2015, CancerLinQ began collaborating with Jitterbit, a company devoted to integrating data from different sources. According to Michele Hazard, Director of Healthcare Solutions, and George Gallegos, CEO, their company can recognize data from 300 different sources, including electronic health records. At the beginning, the diversity and incompatibility of EHRs was a real barrier. It took them several months to figure out each of the first EHRs they tackled, but now they can integrate a new one quickly. Oncology care, the key data needed by CancerLinQ, is a Jitterbit specialty.

Jitterbit logo

One of the barriers raised by EHRs is licensing. The vendor has to “bless” direct access to EHR and data imported from external sources. HIPAA and licensing agreements also make tight security a priority.

Another challenge to processing data is to find records in different institutions and accurately match data for the correct patient.

Although the health care industry is moving toward the FHIR standard, and a few EHRs already expose data through FHIR, others have idiosyncratic formats and support older HL7 standards in different ways. Many don’t even have an API yet. In some cases, Jitterbit has to export the EHR data to a file, transfer it, and unpack it to discover the patient data.

Lack of structure

Jitterbit had become accustomed to looking in different databases to find patient information, even when EHRs claimed to support the same standard. One doctor may put key information under “diagnosis” while another enters it under “patient problems,” and doctors in the same practice may choose different locations.

Worse still, doctors often ignore the structured fields that were meant to hold important patient details and just dictate or type it into a free-text note. CancerLinQ anticipated this, unpacking the free text through optical character recognition (OCR) and natural language processing (NLP), a branch of artificial intelligence.

It’s understandable that a doctor would evade the use of structured fields. Just think of the position she is in, trying to keep a complex cancer case in mind while half a dozen other patients sit in the waiting room for their turn. In order to use the structured field dedicated to each item of information, she would have to first remember which field to use–and if she has privileges at several different institutions, that means keeping the different fields for each hospital in mind.

Then she has to get access to the right field, which may take several clicks and require movement through several screens. The exact information she wants to enter may or may not be available through a drop-down menu. The exact abbreviation or wording may differ from EHR to EHR as well. And to carry through a commitment to using structured fields, she would have to go through this thought process many times per patient. (CancerLinQ itself looks at 18 Quality eMeasures today, with the plan to release additional measures each year.)

Finally, what is the point of all this? Up until recently, the information would never come back in a useful form. To retrieve it, she would have to retrace the same steps she used to enter the structured data in the first place. Simpler to dump what she knows into a free-text note and move on.

It’s worth mentioning that this Babyl of health care information imposes negative impacts on the billing and reimbursement process, even though the EHRs were designed to support those very processes from the start. Insurers have to deal with the same unstructured data that CancerLinQ and Jitterbit have learned to read. The intensive manual process of extracting information adds to the cost of insurance, and ultimately the entire health care system. The recent eClinicalWorks scandal, which resembles Volkswagon’s cheating on auto emissions and will probably spill out to other EHR vendors as well, highlights the failings of health data.

Making data useful

The clue to unblocking this information logjam is deriving insights from data that clinicians can immediately see will improve their interventions with patients. This is what the CancerLinQ team has been doing. They run analytics that suggest what works for different categories of patients, then return the information to oncologists. The CancerLinQ platform also explains which items of data were input to these insights, and urges the doctors to be more disciplined about collecting and storing the data. This is a human-centered, labor-intensive process that can take six to twelve months to set up for each institution. Richard Ross, Chief Operating Officer of CancerLinQ calls the process “trench warfare,” not because its contentious but because it is slow and requires determination.

Of the 18 measures currently requested by CancerLinQ, one of the most critical data elements driving the calculation of multiple measures is staging information: where the cancerous tumors are and how far it has progressed. Family history, treatment plan, and treatment recommendations are other examples of measures gathered.

The data collection process has to start by determining how each practice defines a cancer patient. The CancerLinQ team builds this definition into its request for data. Sometimes they submit “pull” requests at regular intervals to the hospital or clinic, whereas other times the health care provider submits the data to them at a time of its choosing.

Some institutions enforce workflows more rigorously than others. So in some hospitals, CancerLinQ can persuade the doctors to record important information at a certain point during the patient’s visit. In other hospitals, doctors may enter data at times of their own choosing. But if they understand the value that comes from this data, they are more likely to make sure it gets entered, and that it conforms to standards. Many EHRs provide templates that make it easier to use structured fields properly.

When accepting information from each provider, the team goes through a series of steps and does a check-in with the provider at each step. The team evaluates the data in a different stage for each criterion: completeness, accuracy of coding, the number of patients reported, and so on. By providing quick feedback, they can help the practice improve its reporting.

The CancerLinQ/Jitterbit story reveals how difficult it is to apply analytics to health care data. Few organizations can afford the expertise they apply to extracting and curating patient data. On the other hand, CancerLinQ and Jitterbit show that effective data analysis can be done, even in the current messy conditions of electronic data storage. As the next wave of technology standards, such as FHIR, fall into place, more institutions should be able to carry out analytics that save lives.

#TransformHIT Think Tank Hosted by DellEMC

Posted on April 5, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


DellEMC has once again invited me back to participate at the 6th annual #TransformHIT Healthcare Think Tank event happening Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from Noon ET (9 AM PT) – 3 PM ET (Noon PT). I think I’ve been lucky enough to participate 5 of the 6 years and I’ve really enjoyed every one of them. DellEMC does a great job bringing together really smart, interesting people and encourages a sincere, open discussion of major healthcare IT topics. Plus, they do a great job making it so everyone can participate, watch, and share virtually as well.

This year they asked me to moderate the Think Tank which will be a fun new adventure for me, but my job will be made easy by this exceptional list of people that will be participating:

  • John Lynn (@techguy)
  • Paul Sonnier (@Paul_Sonnier)
  • Linda Stotsky (@EMRAnswers)
  • Joe Babaian (@JoeBabaian)
  • Dr. Joe Kim (@DrJosephKim)
  • Andy DeLaO (@cancergeek)
  • Dan Munro (@danmunro)
  • Dr. Jeff Trent (@TGen)
  • Shahid Shah (@ShahidNShah)
  • Dave Dimond(@NextGenHIT)
  • Mike Feibus (@MikeFeibus)

This panel is going to take on three hot topics in the healthcare industry today:

  • Consumerism in Healthcare
  • Precision Medicine
  • Big Data and AI in Healthcare

The great thing is that you can watch the whole #TransformHIT Think Tank event remotely on Livestream (recording will be available after as well). We’ll be watching the #TransformHIT tweet stream and messages to @DellEMCHealth during the event as well if you want to ask any questions or share any insights. We’ll do our best to add outside people’s comments and questions into the discussion. The Think Tank is being held in Phoenix, AZ, so if you’re local there are a few audience seats available if you’d like to come watch live and meet any of the panelists in person. Just let me know in the comments or on our contact us page and I can give you more details.

If you have an interest in healthcare consumerism, precision medicine, or big data and AI in healthcare, then please join us on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 from Noon ET (9 AM PT) – 3 PM ET (Noon PT) for the live stream. It’s sure to be a lively and interesting discussion.
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Possible Healthcare Chatbot Use Cases

Posted on February 1, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I posted in November, I’m extremely interested in chatbots as the next evolution of patient communication. In fact, I’m expecting to see a lot of chatbot talk at HIMSS 2017 in a couple weeks. I should have scheduled a healthcare chatbot meetup at HIMSS17, but didn’t. However, I expect the concept will come up in my other HIMSS 2017 meetups. The idea is finally catching on.

As part of my chatbot learning, I came across David Hawig from Germany who has created a healthcare chatbot named Florence. Florence is still in the early stages, but you can already talk with Florence over Facebook Messenger, and David has an early Skype version and web version as well. I personally used the web version for my tests, but David said that the only real publicly released version is the Facebook Messenger version of Florence because Facebook “messenger has the best chatbot integration so far.”

What I find really interesting and inspiring are these chatbot screenshots that David sent me. I liked them because they inspire me and hopefully you to start thinking about all the ways a healthcare chatbot could help us. Here’s a quick run down of the examples he shared with me:

Daily Health Tips

Doctor Finding Service (with Connection to past record)

Medication Reminder and Tracking

Health Tracker

Health Literacy and Education

Symptom Checker

What do you think about all of these possible uses for chatbots? Are there any others that are missing? Which chatbot uses make the most sense to implement right away?

Healthcare Is Going to Benefit from the Confluence of Consumer Technologies

Posted on December 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Next week is the annual CES conference in Las Vegas. It’s a unique event that brings together 170,000 people across 4 of the largest conference venues in the world. It’s enormous and a little hard to process.

Having attended for the last ~11 years, it’s been amazing to see the pace of progress with so many technologies. Remember that it’s only been about 9 years since the iPhone was launched. While smartphones and tablets have gotten so much better over this time period a whole slew of other consumer technologies have as well.

Looking forward to CES, it’s amazing to see the development of things like: 3D Printing, Virtual Reality, Augmented reality, IoT (Internet of Things…or as I like to call it Smart Everything), voice recognition, AI, robotics, sensors, etc etc etc. It’s an exciting time to be in an industry where so many things are developing so quickly.

Maybe I’m skewed because I’m a blogger in healthcare, but it’s really amazing how healthcare sits at the confluence of so many of these technologies. The overlap that’s going to happen between augmented reality, 3D printing, AI, sensors and new things we barely understand is going to be extraordinary.

I recently saw a 3D printing conference for healthcare. While 3D printing is very exciting for healthcare, it wouldn’t be nearly as exciting if we didn’t have all of the other innovations in cameras, storage, data sharing, virtual reality, etc. We needed evolutions and innovations in all of these spaces for the other technologies to really work well.

I’ve often said that the most interesting things in healthcare happen at the intersections. I think that’s particularly true in the digital health space. As I head to CES, I’ll be watching for this type of crossover of technologies. I think this year we’re going to see a lot of companies utilizing multiple technologies in ways we’d never seen previously.