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2018 Practical Innovation Award Winner: ENGINUITY

Posted on July 25, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As the vision for the Health IT Expo came into view, we realized how valuable it was for the Health IT Expo community to learn about and share practical innovations that were happening in healthcare IT. As part of that effort, we announced the 2018 Practical Innovation Awards. Being the first year, we only had a short time to promote it and get the word out about it. With that said, we’re extremely pleased with the practical innovations that the 2018 Practical Innovation Award Winner has brought to the healthcare IT community and we’re excited to share those with you.

So, without further ado, we’re excited to announce the 2018 Practical Innovation Award Winner is ENGINUITY run by Kelly Del Gaudio, Principal Consultant, Galen Healthcare Solutions and was implemented at Freeman Health System, Valley Health System, and Canton – Potsdam Hospital System. This is a well-deserved honor for Kelly Del Gaudio and the team that worked on this project. Congratulations!

While awards and recognition are great, they don’t mean much if we don’t share the details of the practical innovations that won the award. In order to share more details about ENGINUITY (originally named Project Claire[IT]), we thought an interview with Kelly Del Gaudio would be a great way to share what they accomplished and hopefully help to spread their experiences, insights, and innovations.

Tell us about Project Claire[IT].  How was it started and who was involved?

Project Claire[IT] was what we originally called ENGINUITY. It was a project in honor and memory of my friend and Rule writing mentor at MEDITECH, Claire Riemer. Claire was the original pioneer of the MEDITECH rules engine and led the Clinical Content group there for many years.

The idea for this project started about a few months after I came on as the Principal Consultant for MEDITECH at Galen Healthcare Solutions. Since I had a lot of experience with the MEDITECH Rules engine from people like Claire, and working on a Clinical Optimization Performance Team during my 10 years at the “Tech”, I decided to host a free “Rule Writing 101” webinar that would give users a basic understanding of the MEDITECH Rules engine and offer tips and tricks on how to write some basic rules. We were surprised when we saw the signup list the day of the webinar (which ended up being our highest attended to date), and soon after, the flood gates opened with questions from MEDITECH users asking for help with Rules they’ve been stuck on for weeks, months and sometimes years!

Many of the questions we received were similar (people needing help with calculations, VTE compliance, Problem List Management etc) so we thought maybe we could streamline the process and write the complex rules that everyone seems to need for them; or as we call it: Doing their NerdyWork. Galen was no stranger to this as we have been successful in creating and delivering a similar solution to our Allscripts clients called eCalcs.

I knew I had the unique skill set to write the Rules that these customers needed, but not being a nurse or clinician by trade (although I can occasionally fake it til’ I make it) I knew I needed their help to understand exactly what their frustrations were from both a clinical and IT perspective. The only logical conclusion was to host a focus group, and so our first Galen Focus Group: Operation NerdyWork was born.

Operation NerdyWork was a group of nine MEDITECH hospitals all running MEDITECH’s 6.x/6.1 or higher platform. They represented various areas of the country, from cities to rural/remote, from large Health Systems to small Critical Access satellites. It seems that no matter how big (or small) your IT staff was, the Rules Engine was a bit of a black box for everyone.

Here is our elite nine:

  • Catholic Health Initiatives
  • Salinas Valley Medical Center
  • Randolph Hospital
  • Uvalde Memorial Medical Center
  • Freeman Health System
  • Canton-Potsdam Hospital
  • Peterson Reginal Medical Center
  • Calvert Memorial Hospital
  • Parkview Medical Center

These groups offered their time on Thursdays during the winter of 2016 and provided us with valuable insights into the world of a MEDITECH doctor, nurse, care provider, or pharmacist. From their list of frustrations, we got to work building better, rule driven workflows that will save time, reduce clicks, increase compliance and patient safely and present users with much needed clinical decision support.

We decided to call our platform ENGINUITY because we use the MEDITECH Rules Engine to code a lot of our custom content. It’s also a derivative of the word ingenuity which is the quality of being inventive, clever, resourceful; thinking outside of the box. We pride ourselves on coming up with really clever ways to achieve something that may otherwise be “Working as Designed”. ENGINUITY continues to be crowdsourced and we receive suggestions every day from users of our content. MEDITECH customers drive the future direction of this product because hey, they’re the one that have to use it right?

What have been the practical benefits of this project?

Practical Innovation is all about solutions that can be implemented now that bring value to an organization. We think we are doing just that.

By streamlining the lengthy design process that many of these rules take to write and creating a plug and play solution that has been tested, validated, and thoroughly researched, we can confidently help hospitals achieve optimal compliance, increased patient and provider satisfaction, EMR confidence, realize revenue gains and so much more. If you wanted to implement some of these complex tools outside of ENGINUITY, not only would you need at least one full time dedicated FTE on these projects, but that person would need to have an advanced Rule writing skill set which is not easy to find. You would also need to keep those people on staff to troubleshoot Rules that are subject to change during much needed updates or future workflow changes.

I actually spoke with a client at last year’s MUSE conference who told me that their resident “Rules” person was about to retire so they stopped optimizing their system because she was the only one who could support it. I used this anecdote the next day at our official launch presentation and realized that this was more common than I thought. Rules are complex and there are a lot of unknowns but they are far and away the most efficient way to optimize the your MEDITECH system which is why everyone should have them!

ENGINUITY makes these options an affordable reality for many organizations that simply don’t have the time, capital or resources. The Galen team supports all of our content post-implementation, so our clients can worry about daily system support and education.  ENGINUITY customers also determine “what’s next” in our dev cycle and are always receiving the fruit of our development efforts keeping their system optimized, refreshed and functional for years to come.

What were the keys to success with this project? 

I attribute the success of this project to 5 main things.

  1. First, having a deep understanding of the technical underpinnings of the MEDITECH Rules Engine is crucial to the success of ENGINUITY. I have always been fascinated with trying to figure out this puzzle and I continue to learn more about it daily. For me, it’s fun; for most, its frustrating. Thank you Claire Riemer, Ginny Jacques and Nancy McGowan for teaching me this craft.
  2. Second, having the support of the Galen Healthcare Solutions team. They let me run with this idea to design, develop and mass deliver content to clients who need it and they’ve fully supported it through its infancy to now. We are KLAS ranked and on Modern HealthCare’s Best Places to Work for a reason and I know working at Galen was one of the best decisions I have ever made. I firmly believe that autonomy, support and confidence is really what helps innovation to thrive.
  3. Third, our focus group. They are the ones who brought the ideas to the table and got the ball rolling. Thank you Operation NerdyWork!
  4. Fourth, our ENGINUITY clients who push us and challenge us with new puzzles every day. Their challenges (though sometimes daunting) make us better in the long run.
  5. Finally, getting the word out in major healthcare IT publications! Having published articles that recognize our unique approach to customer collaboration and feature our MU3: Measure 3 content really help to spread the word about what we’re doing.

How does this project impact patients?

We put a lot of effort in the design process of a workflow to make it easy for the doctor/user to use. Many of our tools are “single-click” meaning that as soon as I “click” on something (a query or order) then the algorithm will “fetch” necessary data and bring that to the providers attention immediately. We can suggest, require, suppress or automate responses based on preexisting information which makes ENGINUITY very patient centric. This added clinical decision support is embedded directly into the MEDITECH system (not 3rd party) which significantly increases the confidence that users have in the messages they are receiving. We can then use a combination of hard stops, soft stops, alerts and audit trails to increase patient safety across the board.

We’re currently working on a case study of before and after Implementation of our VTE Compliance protocol, which was designed using the AHRQ’s Best Practice recommendations for VTE Prophylaxis compliance. It is estimated at increasing organizational compliance to over 90% which will significantly impact the lives of many surgical inpatients.

I also worked with some of our product development folks from our VitalCenter Online Archival team to create a way to have Rules evaluate patient Problems and drive care off the Problem List. From my research, this is not just a MEDITECH problem, (pun intended) but it spans across all EMRs leaving most Problem Lists “static”. We are changing that for our MEDITECH clients by driving and automating care off the Problem List making it a truly “dynamic” list.

You call the effort “Operation NerdyWork”.  What’s been your experience getting “nerds” together to collaborate on a solution like this?

Operation NerdyWork was all about bringing a diverse group of people together with some commonalities (trades, users of MEDITECH) and working together toward a common goal. Listening to each other’s pain points and sometimes even solving each other’s problems without my help at all (which was really fun to see). Everyone brought a unique voice to the table. As innovators, the best we can do is shut up and listen, hear what people want and develop what they need.

What practical advice would you give health IT professionals that will help them be more successful in their work?

Find something you’re good at, something you’re passionate about, something that keeps you up at night but also helps you rest easy knowing you could be a part of the solution. When you’ve found it then surround yourself with supportive people and get busy on the Nerdywork.

A big Congratulations to the 2018 Practical Innovation Award Winner: ENGINUITY

CMS Wants Interoperability. Should Patient Data Access Champions Cheer – or Not? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 12, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/15 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Janice McCallum (@janicemccallum) on the topic of “CMS Wants Interoperability. Should Patient Data Access Champions Cheer – or Not?.”

Earlier this year at HIMSS18 and HealthDataPalooza, Seema Verma, CMS Administrator, announced the MyHealthEData initiative that places a priority on interoperability of EHRs, a long desired objective of health data enthusiasts.

The MyHealthEData initiative proposes open APIs with common data standards that will facilitate access to EHR data for software developers, although the business terms for accessing the data aren’t yet clear. In today’s #HITsm chat, I’d like to focus on how the MyHealthEData initiative will—or will not– benefit patients directly. I have more questions than answers and look forward to input from a range of healthIT and data management experts, patient data access advocates, innovation enthusiasts, and more.

First, some background materials:

This is the official announcement of MyHealthEData: https://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-releases/2018-Press-releases-items/2018-03-06.html.  Note, the initiative is not intended to give consumers direct access to their data from their healthcare providers; rather, it gives them the ability to choose a “provider that best meets their needs and then give that provider secure access to their data, leading to greater competition and reducing costs. ” In this case, “provider” means a technology provider that will likely charge an initial fee and an ongoing fee for data management.

From ONC director, Don Rucker on interoperability, transparency and an API ecosystem: https://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/interoperability/apis-path-putting-patients-center/

Adrian Gropper, MD, in a comment on Rucker’s post on the Health Care Blog, questions whether patient-friendly and cost-effective developers will have full access to APIs:

The issue is fairly simple and was well documented by the API Task Force: Can a small, independent startup serving patients or physicians have access to the FHIR API if the patient says it should – period? http://thehealthcareblog.com/blog/2018/04/24/apis-a-path-to-putting-patients-at-the-center/

Finally, some insights from the current state of the Apple Health app that may give us reason to question how quickly something close to full data access and ongoing data liquidity will occur: https://corepointhealth.com/apple-health-fhir

Join me for this week’s #HITsm chat. Let’s start the conversation.

T1 : Does anyone see any downside to the latest data and API standards? Is anything missing from CMS announcements and fact sheets? Or, should we all be cheering? #HITsm

T2: Health IT vendors that focus on patient engagement and patient data management should be happy about MyHealthEData. Who among the existing patient data app developers do you think will benefit most from an API ecosystem? Who might be hurt? #HITsm

T3: Do you think patient access to full health records will be more affordable due to MyHealthEData? #HITsm

T4: How long do you think it will take to make the apps useful to patients with complex conditions, given the current state of data availability via Apple Health app and early patient portals? #HITsm

T5: What’s the likely business model for the app developers? #HITsm
Here are some possibilities to discuss:
(1) app developers charge low price to patients; revenue will come from businesses that want to buy access to aggregate data.
2) Full fee paid by patients.
3) An advertising model?
4) Access to app is given as a benefit to existing customers, e.g., Google can afford to offer app for free/low cost to existing customers, because it sells other services; health insurers can subsidize costs to incentivize patients to better manage their health status via health data apps.
5) Other revenue/business models?

Bonus: How do you think healthcare providers will react to the requirement that they “ensure data sharing”? How will it affect small physician practices v. hospitals? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/22 – IT and Affordability, Care for the Poor, Population Health in Low-income Areas
Hosted by Lenny Liebmann (@LennyLiebmann)

6/29 – How Nursing Informatics is Changing the Healthcare Landscape
Hosted by Cathy Turner (@MEDITECH_Nurses) and Ashley Dauwer (@amariedauwer) from @MEDITECH

7/6 – What’s the Future of Patient Communication?
Hosted by Lea Chatham (@LeaChatham)

7/13 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

7/20 – TBD
Hosted by Jared Jeffery (@Jk_Jeffery)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

How Technology and Healthcare Should Gracefully Collide to Provide the Best Patient Experience – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on June 5, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 6/8 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jeanne Bliss (@jeannebliss) and Michelle Chaffee (@mdchaffee) on the topic of “How Technology and Healthcare Should Gracefully Collide to Provide the Best Patient Experience.”

Enhancing patient engagement and improving patient experience are priorities for many hospitals and health systems. And customer experience in healthcare must be a balance of human care and technical care – only when it enhances and improved human care. In this chat we’ll discuss the critical balance of the two and how high tech must enable and support high human touch, as well as best practices and the companies who are enabling technology support for human care delivery.

Reference Materials:

What Is Patient Experience?

Association of Patient Experience

Healthcare Systems Should Start Thinking “Would You Do That to Your Mother?”

Next-gen patient engagement: Applied intelligence and omni-channel messaging

Join me for this week’s #HITsm chat. Let’s start the conversation.

T1: What strategies can healthcare patients, caregivers, clinical service providers, and payers employ to leverage technology to enhance the patient experience? #HITsm

T2: What are the touchpoints that can impact patient experience and what do you think are some of the best ways to utilize technology at each touchpoint? #HITsm

T3: What are some non-medical needs and opportunities for enhancing health outcomes and how can technology support these opportunities? #HITsm

T4: What are some examples how other industries outside of healthcare have used technology to support a good customer experience? #HITsm

T5: How can social media and the ‘sharing & collaboration’ tools that have grown so rapidly over the last 6-8 years enhance the patient experience? #HITsm

Bonus: What are some examples of the worst patient experience involving technology that you or someone you know has ever experienced? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/15 – TBD
Hosted by Janice McCallum (@janicemccallum)

6/22 – IT and Affordability, Care for the Poor, Population Health in Low-income Areas
Hosted by Lenny Liebmann (@LennyLiebmann)

6/29 – TBD
Hosted by Cathy Turner (@MEDITECH_Nurses) from @MEDITECH

7/6 – TBD
Hosted by Lea Chatham (@LeaChatham)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

How Health IT Helps and Hurts Patients – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on May 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/25 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Amanda (@LALupusLady) on the topic of “How Health IT Helps and Hurts Patients (Especially Those with Chronic Conditions).”

Health IT is a powerful tool. It has changed the way patients, especially people with chronic illnesses live with and manage their care. As a woman living with multiple autoimmune illnesses for over three decades, my perspective is unique as I have seen the shift and how providers have been eager to adopt technology into their practice and recently experienced a doctor’s office where the fax machine is still the primary means of communication.

In my patient experience, I have chosen to adopt and use Health IT to assist me in managing my chronic care. Whether I am tracking my symptoms, keeping a food diary, or putting on a VR headset to help me relieve my pain, Health IT has improved my patient experience. While at the same time, the fact that with all the advances in Health IT that not every advance is a step forward for healthcare. There is frustration by patients that (in 2018) EHR developers have not yet developed a way for various platforms and institutions to connect to create one complete healthcare record for one patient.

Next week, I am proud that I will be at #HITExpo to share my patient experience at Healthcare Scene’s inaugural event in New Orleans. Understanding the value and insight that patients have can build an empathy, which I feel will directly improve the way Health IT collaborations work together.

Join me for this week’s #HITsm chat. Let’s start the conversation.

T1: How is Health IT (Apps, Devices and New Technology) helping streamline the patient experience (especially for people living with chronic conditions)? #HITsm

T2: How is Health IT hindering (hurting) the patient experience (especially for people living with chronic conditions)? #HITsm

T3: What Health IT companies/developers have made a positive impact on your life? How? If you are a patient, what Health IT has directly improved your patient experience? #HITsm

T4: How can Health IT work together with patient communities to improve outcomes and engagement? #HITsm

T5: What can you do to support Health IT “collaborations that work” with patients, especially those living with chronic conditions? #HITsm

Bonus: What are you most looking forward to at #HITExpo? #HITsm

Wishing you a Healthy and Happy Lupus Awareness Month. Can’t wait to chat together.

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
6/1 – #HITExpo Hiatus
The #HITsm chat will be on hiatus this week with the Health IT Expo happening in New Orleans. Please join in on the conversation happening on the #HITExpo conference hashtag.

6/8 – How Technology and Healthcare Should Gracefully Collide to Provide the Best Patient Experience
Hosted by Jeanne Bliss (@jeannebliss) and Michelle Chaffee (@mdchaffee)

6/15 – TBD
Hosted by Janice McCallum (@janicemccallum)

6/22 – IT and Affordability, Care for the Poor, Population Health in Low-income Areas
Hosted by Lenny Liebmann (@LennyLiebmann)

6/29 – TBD
Hosted by Cathy Turner (@MEDITECH_Nurses) from @MEDITECH

7/6 – TBD
Hosted by Lea Chatham (@LeaChatham)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Practical Applications of EMR Optimization Through Clinical Decision Support – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on May 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 5/18 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Justin Campbell (@tjustincampbell) from @GalenHealthcare on the topic of “Practical Applications of EMR Optimization Through Clinical Decision Support”


As a primer for the upcoming Health IT Expo, we will be discussing practical applications of EMR optimization through clinical decision support. Optimization dominates Health IT leaders’ list of priorities as they seek to rationalize EMR investment and harness its capabilities for improving efficiency, care and outcomes. However, boil-the-ocean approaches to EMR optimization can be counterproductive and stifle progress. Instead, Health IT leaders would be best served to focus on practical applications of optimization – specifically through clinical decision support, which serves as a lynchpin to clinical quality improvement initiatives.

Clinical decision support (CDS) provides clinicians, staff, patients or other individuals with knowledge and person-specific information, intelligently filtered or presented at appropriate times, to enhance health and health care.

CDS has a number of important benefits, including:

  • Increased quality of care and enhanced health outcomes
  • Avoidance of errors and adverse events
  • Improved efficiency, cost-benefit, and provider and patient satisfaction

CDS encompasses a variety of tools to enhance decision-making in the clinical workflow. These tools include:

  • Computerized alerts and reminders to care providers and patients
  • Clinical guidelines
  • Condition-specific order sets
  • Focused patient data reports and summaries
  • Documentation templates
  • Diagnostic support, and contextually relevant reference information

The majority of CDS applications operate as components of comprehensive EHR systems, although stand-alone CDS systems are also used. Many modern EMRs contain CDS capabilities such as rule engines, predictive modeling languages, and alert and order set authoring. However, the development and use of effective CDS within the EMR requires significant clinical, IT, and knowledge management resources that many organizations do not possess. This has led an increasing number of organizations to use compartmentalized decision support platforms other than EMR to drive portions of their CDS programs.

Ideally, CDS tools will be readily accessible to a wide array of caregivers where and when they need them, irrespective of what electronic health record they’re using. One such initiative emerging to share CDS resources is the AHRQ-funded CDS Consortium Project, which has demonstrated successfully that CDS from Partners Healthcare could be delivered to disparate EMRs across the country.

In an age of overwhelming data access and rapid technological development, ensuring clinicians have the clinical decision support tools to sift through a sea of information to find what is most relevant to their patient’s needs is vital to optimizing health outcomes.

In this tweetchat, we will discuss types of CDS (including sepsis surveillance, risk calculators, drug interaction, among others), mechanisms to deliver CDS to the point of care, workflow and alert fatigue implications, and methods for sharing proven CDS libraries.

Resources and Other EMR Optimization & CDS Reading:

  1. EMR Optimization Whitepaper
  2. EMR Optimization Infographic
  3. HealthIT.gov Clinical Decision Support
  4. CDS in the Cloud: Deploying a CDC Guideline for National Use
  5. Almost 20 Percent of CDS Alert Dismissals May Be Inappropriate
  6. EHR vendors, AHIMA push use of clinical decision support to prevent patient falls
  7. EMR Sepsis Surveillance – Achieving Optimal Sepsis Sensitivity & Specificity
  8. Integrated Health Calculators Whitepaper

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we’ll discuss the following:

T1: What experiences do you have with CDS implementation? What impacts (positive and negative) did it have? #HITsm

T2: How can CDS best be deployed to the point of care without exacerbating alert fatigue? #HITsm

T3: How are different types of CDS initiatives (VTE, sepsis detection & prevention; clinical pathways implementation; risk calculation) prioritized? #HITsm

T4: Is CDS best suited to be managed by EMR vendors or can CDS be shared across vendors? How? #HITsm

T5: What are strategies to manage to CDS code and clinical peer review and rating? #HITsm

Bonus: What are mechanisms for making knowledge artifacts for CDS shareable? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
5/25 – TBD
Hosted by Amanda (@LALupusLady)

6/1 – #HITExpo Hiatus
The #HITsm chat will be on hiatus this week with the Health IT Expo happening in New Orleans. Please join in on the conversation happening on the #HITExpo conference hashtag.

6/8 – TBD
Hosted by Jeanne Bliss (@jeannebliss)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Practical Health IT Innovation Conference

Posted on February 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those regular readers, you’ve probably been seeing some of the promotion we’ve been doing for a new healthcare IT conference called Health IT Expo. Yes, this is our first time hosting a healthcare IT Conference of our own, but we are in our 5th year organizing the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference. While we attend and enjoy attending ~30 healthcare IT conferences per year, we think there’s something missing in these conferences that we can address at Health IT Expo.

Hundreds of people over the years have suggested that we should host our own healthcare IT conference. I’d always resisted doing so because I didn’t want to just create another me too conference. In many ways, it felt like there were enough conferences. However, having attended hundreds of conference over the years, I realized that something really big was missing at these conferences: practical innovation.

Most healthcare IT conferences are short on practical innovation and long on useless platitudes.

Last month I wrote that Health IT Expo was the Anti Moonshot Conference. Not that there’s anything wrong with people working on moonshot ideas. That’s a lot of fun and really exciting. However, if you’re a healthcare IT professional that’s overwhelmed by operational minutiea, listening to moonshot ideas ends up leaving you empty and longing for practical innovations that can improve your work life.

Long story short, we’ll be focusing the conference on the following 5 areas of healthcare IT innovation to start:

  • Security and Privacy
  • Analytics
  • Communication and Patient Engagement
  • IT Dev Ops
  • Operational Alignment and Support

We want to take everything we’ve learned attending conferences and organizing one for 5 years and make Health IT Expo a one of a kind experience for those working in these 5 areas.

As part of this conference, we also want to extend the innovation that’s shared over the 2 day event well beyond the conference. One of the other major challenges in healthcare IT is that innovations aren’t shared between organizations. Unlike healthcare data, we don’t mind sharing innovations in healthcare IT. However, there hasn’t been a great platform for this sharing.

For example, how does an IT professional at a hospital share a unique way they implemented 1000 new virtual desktops and saved their organization time and money? The sad answer is they don’t. How does a healthcare IT professional learn about a new company that can solve their physician communication problems? In many cases they don’t.

One of our goals is to use Healthcare Scene and this new conference to create a platform for innovation sharing. As a simple example, we’re finalizing resource pages around each of the 5 topics listed above. These pages will list companies that are innovating in each spaceso they’re easy to find. I’ve been blogging for 12 years and published over 12,000 blog posts and even I was surprised by some of the companies we found. We’ll do a future post linking to those pages once they’re published.

At the end of the day, we have one major goal. How can we make healthcare IT professionals lives better so we improve healthcare?

If that goal interests you, take a minute to check out Health IT Expo. If you’re a healthcare IT professional that wants to be part of this community, reach out to us on our contact us page. Share your experience with us and we’ll give you a special discount code to attend the conference where it doesn’t break your budget.