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FilmArray Delivers Test Results in An Hour

Posted on February 18, 2013 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Maybe it’s because I live in Utah, so it’s easier for me to recognize the technology being created here, but it seems as if lately, I’ve been noticing a lot of medical devices created here. Last night I was reading KSL.com about a device that was recently designed that can apparently detect certain diseases — and, most impressively, in under an hour.

Waiting for lab results can be excruciating. Although I have access to the patient portal for Intermountain Healthcare, and can see results as soon as they are done (which is, most of the time, much faster than waiting for the doctor to call), it still takes longer than I would like. FilmArray is a test that can detect around 20 diseases in less than an hour.

The diseases that can be detected can be viral or bacterial, and are related to upper respiratory infections. This could be pretty helpful, especially when you or your child goes to the doctor, and they can’t really tell what’s wrong just by looking at them or listening to their lungs. It can help to get treatment started quicker, and hopefully shorten the length of the symptoms.

FilmArray also eliminates the need for someone to spend a ton of time in the lab working the results, as it takes less than about five minutes of a tech’s time. It’s a machine that is easy to learn how to use, so staff can be trained fairly easily, without much disruption in the regular schedule.

This graphic from the FilmArray website shows how easily it works, from start to finish:

filmarray_setup

The device has been available since 2011, though I don’t get the impression that it’s very mainstream yet. I think this could be a great thing for doctor’s offices and hospitals to invest it, because of it’s quickly produced results, and the ease of use involved. Even with an initial investment, it seems as if the time saved will pay it off in the end.

Smart Phone Enabled Thermometer Approved By FDA

Posted on November 28, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Well, this is pretty neat.

The FDA has recently approved a body thermometer that works with the iPhone. It is said to be suitable for people ages two and up, so along with the at-home remotoscope and the smart phone brain scanner, people can basically start having an at-home doctor’s office! Okay, not really, but it’s starting to seem this way.

The “Raiing” is a small device that is placed under the armpit. Not only does it give the temperature of an individual, but it has the ability to continually track for a period of time, all the while having the information sent via bluetooth to an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. A “pre-set temperature” can be selected, and if it is reached or surpassed, an alert is sent to the mobile app. For anyone worried about their own temperature (or a child’s) throughout the night, this could really bring some piece of mind and perhaps a few less sleepless nights.

72 hours can be recorded before the information has to be synchronized with the mobile device, and a record can be kept as well — either on the phone, or on the cloud service provided by Raiing.

This image below is from the website, and shows a little bit how it works, and what the interface of the app looks like.


And here is an actual screenshot of the app:

 

This looks like it’s the first smart phone thermometer available, and it looks like it has been well-thought out. I didn’t see anything about pricing on the website, or the ability to purchase it, but the accompanying app can be downloaded here from iTunes (and is free).

I’d love to see this available for Android devices sometime in the future. Hopefully if it is successful on iOS devices, then it will be offered to Android as well. This is definitely something I would be willing to invest a little bit of money into getting.

Where You Live Affects What You Eat Infographic

Posted on October 29, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Ever wonder about the eating habits of people that live in San Francisco or Philly? How about Tokyo or Sao Paulo? This infographic takes a look into what people in different cities around the world eat, and assign them a “health rating,” which shows the average percentile of fit/fat health ratings on the Eatery. For Tokyo, the creators of this infographic said they weren’t sure why their rating was so low. That perplexed me a little bit as well, seeing as their top foods include fish, curry, and tofu. I couldn’t overall relate to one specific city, but felt more like my eating habits were a mix of all these cities. Another great infographic from Massive Health.

Be Careful Where You Eat — It Affects More Than You Realize — Infographic

Posted on October 22, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

Tempted to go out to eat? Think again. This infographic shows how where we eat heavily affects health and obesity rates. Yes, it is possible to eat healthy when going out, but it is definitely very hard. Have you seen the portion sizes at most restaurants? They are enough to feed two or three people — which is the reason why my husband and I always share meals. And not only does eating at home versus out affect health, but where you live does as well.

Times and Days Affect Eating Habits – Infographic From Massive Health

Posted on October 11, 2012 I Written By

Katie Clark is originally from Colorado and currently lives in Utah with her husband and son. She writes primarily for Smart Phone Health Care, but contributes to several Health Care Scene blogs, including EMR Thoughts, EMR and EHR, and EMR and HIPAA. She enjoys learning about Health IT and mHealth, and finding ways to improve her own health along the way.

This is another very interesting infographic from Massive Health. Throughout my life, I’ve been trying to avoid eating after 8, consume most of my calories during the earlier part of the day, and when I eat richer foods, limit my portion size. However, I’ll be the first to admit I don’t always follow those “rules.” Well, this infographic really made me re-examine my own habits, because I could see that I fell into some of these patterns. Interesting statistics, and it definitely makes me want to eat a good, healthy breakfast! I wonder what mobile health apps can help to change our eating habits.

Quantified Self Is the Future

Posted on October 20, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know I’ve mentioned the quantified self a few times in the past. Basically quantified self is that we’re all going to start finding methods, apps, sensors, etc that will collect data about our bodies. I have never been more certain of this movement than I have been talking to the people at the Connected Health Symposium in Boston. It’s going to take a few years for all of the technologies to develop, but it’s going to happen.

A simple example of this is a startup company I met called Ubiqi Health. They have a migraine tracker that helps people to track their migraines and identify their cause. Plus, this is just their first integration. I think it’s really smart for them to work on migraines first. Lots of people have migraines and very few people have a problem admitting that they have a headache (or migraine). For some reason it’s socially acceptable to say you have a headache, but not so much to say you’re depressed for example.

One thing that’s also become clear is that it’s not just going to be devices that work to “quantify” someone. It’s going to be a great mix of devices, but also is going to have to include the narrative that a person provides. The interesting thing is that from the narrative you can often capture events that might have influenced the “disease” and also can explain the quantitative data.

This is going to be really interesting to watch. I’m still thinking about how all of this data is going to affect the doctors and how they treat patients. Either way, it’s going to transform the way we deal with “health care.”

Welcome to Smart Phone Health Care!!

Posted on January 24, 2011 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Thanks for visiting Smart Phone Health Care. We’re still putting everything together, but soon you will find all the latest and greatest gadgets and technology that you can use in Health Care. Yes, we’ll be covering the various smart phone apps for the iPhone, Android and iPad. We’ll also take a look at the other medical devices that can make physicians and patients lives much easier.

Come back soon to find all the great mobile technology that’s available for health care.

HealthCentral’s Acquisition of Wellsphere – Much Ado About Nothing

Posted on February 3, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Unless you’re a part of the health care blogosphere, you probably haven’t been following the incredible firestorm that health care bloggers have created around the acquisition of Wellsphere by HealthCentral. Here’s the cliff notes version:

  • Bloggers receive flattering email from Wellsphere asking to join their Health Care blogger network
  • Bloggers provide their blog feed to Wellsphere
  • Wellsphere aggregates their blog content for months
  • HealthCentral Acquires Wellsphere
  • Bloggers Freak Out
  • Bloggers learn that the TOS gave Wellsphere the right to sell their content
  • Bloggers feel betrayed
  • Bloggers flame Wellsphere and HealthCentral for acquiring them
  • Bloggers pull their blog feeds from Wellsphere
  • ? (still to be written)

Honestly, I feel like bloggers are making much ado about nothing.  Sure, the emails from Dr. Rutledge were incredibly flattering.  I had to literally tell myself when reading them that Dr. Rutledge had never read my blog.  He didn’t really know how good I am at blogging even though his email called me an “expert blogger” and a “true medical expert.”  Seems like many bloggers who got that email couldn’t read through the marketing gloss.  (See the full emails here)

I too joined Wellsphere and my experience was very much like this health care blogger except the part where he feels like a sucker.   I knew what I was getting into.   All that was suggested was getting more exposure for my blog and possibly more credibility and visibility for my name.  My blog being about Health Care IT I didn’t see the promised traffic and so I pulled my blog.  No harm no foul.

I think people are making a bigger deal out of having their content on Wellsphere anyway.  If you’re blog holds any weight, then there are tons of spammers all over the internet that are pulling in your feed and republishing it.  Having it on Wellsphere doesn’t change the value of your content.  In fact, in some ways it can add more value to your content since it links back to your original post.

Sure, I feel bad for those bloggers that didn’t understand what they were getting into.  However, do I think that Wellsphere was unethical in what they did: No.  I also disagree with Dmitriy who said that “Wellsphere epitomizes all that is wrong with the “Health 2.0 Movement.””  There are so many bigger issues with Health 2.0 than this, but I digress.   From my experience, Wellsphere did exactly what they told me they were going to do.  Do I wish they could have driven more traffic to my site?  Yes.  Did it happen?  No.  Oh well, it was worth a try and cost me almost nothing.

The funny part for me about all of this is that just last week I sent an email to a couple wellness educator friends of mine that were looking to creating a wellness website.  I sent them Wellsphere as an interesting example of building a community of people focused on Wellness.  When asked, I told them that Wellsphere was probably VC funded and as such would be looking for exit opportunities.  That’s just how a website like it works.  You build it to exit.  Most common of which is purchase by another company.  It’s just unfortunate that so many bloggers were unaware of the web VC busines model.  Don’t expect this to change anytime soon.

Since I’m the eternal optimist, let’s take a look at a couple really cool things that have happened because of the HealthCentral acquisition of WellSphere:

  • I’ve found a ton of really cool Health Care bloggers that I’d never known before
  • Health Care bloggers have never been more passionate and united in a common cause

Now if we can harness that passion and energy to something as important as health care and wellness, we can certainly do a lot of good.

Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming.

Not an EMR Pessimist

Posted on January 31, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It seems like from my recent post about the possible reasons Healthcare IT can’t spend $20 billion has some people thinking that it was a negative post about the funding and possibly Healthcare IT/EMR as well.

I can assure you that I am most definitely an optimist in life and EMR. I don’t think I could support and implement an EMR if I wasn’t that way. In fact, that was kind of the purpose of my post about the long term benefits of broad EMR adoption. My point in that post was to suggest that the benefits of broad EMR adoption will be incredible. Just that it’s probably hard for most of us (including myself) to see the possibilities of having an EMR in every doctor’s office.

My hope in highlighting the possible challenges is to hopefully provide a platform for a larger discussion of the issues associated with this unprecedented investment in health care. In fact, I’d say that one of my main goals with this blog is to provide those interested in EMR points to consider when implementing an EMR. I believe information and discussion is powerful and I hope that I’ve helped to make that discussion and information sharing to happen.

What is certain is that I’m very optimistic that we’ll get to broad EMR adoption. It’s inevitable. I’ve met a lot of students in medical schools and they can’t understand why every doctor doesn’t use an EMR. This digital generation of students are digital natives. It’s all they’ve known. Once they finally start entering the marketplace in droves we’re going to see a huge shift in EMR adoption and I believe far fewer failures in the process (along with other reasons).

In fact, it makes me wonder if the reason health care has been slower than almost every other industry to adopt technology is because doctors spend so long in school. These digital natives have just begun entering the health care workforce and so they’re impact hasn’t been felt yet. Just a theory, but at least interesting to consider.

Do We Know What Obama’s Health Plan Is?

Posted on January 22, 2009 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been writing quite a bit lately about Obama’s investment in EMR and healthcare IT. I find the topic completely fascinating and so I expect I’ll be writing a lot more about Obama and EMR/EHR. Hopefully I can not just talk about it, but add something to the conversation.

Related to all of this is a headline I recently read from The American Spectator that said “Obamacare Could Kill You.” While the headline is meant to attract attention, the first paragraph in the article made a lot of sense. Here’s a small portion of it:

It is probable, therefore, that many people who believe they voted merely for what the Obama-Biden campaign site calls “affordable and accessible” health care will be unpleasantly surprised by the “reform” they are about to get.

It is pretty amazing that Obama could put forth such an ideal with so little detail work on how he was going to make healthcare affordable and accessible. If like the article implies that Tom Daschle is looking at adding in more government bureaucracy to healthcare, then our healthcare system is in real trouble. It reminds me a lot of another headline I read that basically said “To see Government run health care, then Just Take a Look at Medicare.” Can you imagine?