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An Interesting Overview Of Alphabet’s Healthcare Investments

Posted on June 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Recently I’ve begun reading a blog called The Medical Futurist which offers some very interesting fare. In addition to some intriguing speculation, it includes some research that I haven’t seen anywhere else. (It is written by a physician named Bertalan Mesko.)

In this case, Mesko has buried a shrewd and well-researched piece on Alphabet’s healthcare investments in an otherwise rambling article. (The rambling part is actually pretty interesting on its own, by the way.)

The piece offers a rather comprehensive update on Alphabet’s investments in and partnerships with healthcare-related companies, suggesting that no other contender in Silicon Valley is investing in this sector heavily as Alphabet’s GV (formerly Google Ventures). I don’t know if he’s right about this, but it’s probably true.

By Mesko’s count, GV has backed almost 60 health-related enterprises since the fund was first kicked off in 2009. These investments include direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andme, health insurance company Oscar Health, telemedicine venture Doctor on Demand and Flatiron Health, which is building an oncology-focused data platform.

Mesko also points out that GV has had an admirable track record so far, with five of the companies it first backed going public in the last year. I’m not sure I agree that going public is per se a sign of success — a lot depends on how the IPO is received by Wall Street– but I see his logic.

In addition, he notes that Alphabet is stocking up on intellectual resources. The article cites research by Ernest & Young reporting that Alphabet filed 186 healthcare-related patents between 2013 and 2017.

Most of these patents are related to DeepMind, which Google acquired in 2014, and Verily Life Sciences (formerly Google Life Sciences). While these deals are interesting in and of themselves, on a broader level the patents demonstrate Alphabet’s interest in treating chronic illnesses like diabetes and the use of bioelectronics, he says.

Meanwhile, Verily continues to work on a genetic data-collecting initiative known as the Baseline Study. It plans to leverage this data, using some of the same algorithms behind Google’s search technology, to pinpoint what makes people healthy.

It’s a grand and somewhat intimidating picture.

Obviously, there’s a lot more to discuss here, and even Mesko’s in-depth piece barely scratches the surface of what can come out of Alphabet and Google’s health investments. Regardless, it’s worth keeping track of their activity in the sector even if you find it overwhelming. You may be working for one of those companies someday.

IBM Watson Health Layoffs Suggests AI Strategy Isn’t Working

Posted on June 6, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

IBM Watson Health is apparently making massive cuts to its staff, in a move suggesting that its healthcare AI isn’t working.

Watson Health leaders have argued that AI (which Watson Health leaders call “cognitive computing”) as the solution to many of the healthcare industry’s problems. IBM pitched Watson technology as a revolutionary tool which could get to the root of difficult medical problems.

Over time, however, it’s begun to look like this wasn’t going to happen, at least for the present. Among other high-profile goofs, IBM Watson has struggled with applying the supercomputing tech to oncology, which was one of its main goals.

Now IBM Watson Health has slashed up to 70% of its staff, according to sources speaking to The Register. The site reports that most of the layoffs are cutting staff within companies IBM has brought in an effort to build out its healthcare credentials. These include medical data company Truven, acquired in 2016 for $2.6 billion, medical imaging firm Merge, bought in 2015 for $1 billion and healthcare management firm Phytel, the site reports.

The cuts reflect a major strategic shift for Watson Health, which was one of IBM’s flagship divisions until recently. Having invested heavily in businesses that might have helped it dominate the health IT world, it now appears to be rethinking it’s all in approach.

That being said, no one has suggested that IBM Watson Health will disappear in a poof of smoke. IBM corporate leaders seem dedicated to an AI future. However, if this report is correct, Watson Health is being reorganized completely. Not too much of a surprise since given how hyped it was, it would have been almost impossible for it to live up to the hype.

To me, this suggests that rolling out healthcare AI tools might call for a completely different business model. Rather than applying brute force supercomputing tools to enterprise healthcare issues, it may be better to build from the ground up.

For example, consider Google’s approach to healthcare AI supercomputing. UK-based DeepMind is building relationships and products from the ground up. Working with the National Health Service DeepMind Health is bringing mobile tools and AI research to hospitals. Its mobile health tools include Streams, a secure mobile phone app which feeds critical medical information to doctors and hospitals.

In my opinion, the future of AI in healthcare will look more like the DeepMind model and less like IBM Watson’s top-down approach. Building out AI-based tools and platforms for physicians and nurses first just makes sense.

Alexa Voice Assistant Centerpiece Of Amazon Health Effort

Posted on June 1, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I don’t know about you, but until recently I had thought of the Amazon Echo is something of a toy. From what I saw, it seemed too cute, too gimmicky and definitely too expensive for my taste. Then I had a chance to try out the Echo my mother kept in her kitchen.

It’s almost embarrassing to say how quickly I was hooked. I didn’t even use many of Alexa’s capabilities. All I had to do was command her to play some music, answer some questions and do a search on the Amazon.com site and I was convinced I needed to have one. Its $99 price suddenly seemed like a bargain.

Of course, being a health IT geek I immediately wondered how the Alexa voice assistant might play a part in applications like telemedicine, but I was spending too much time playing “Name That Song” (I’m an 80s champ) to think things through.

But I had the right instincts. It’s become increasingly clear that Amazon sees Alexa as a key channel for reaching healthcare decision-makers.

According to a story appearing on the CNBC website, Amazon has built a 12-person team within the Alexa voice-assisted division called “health & wellness” whose focus is to make Alexa more useful to healthcare patients and providers. Its first targets include diabetes management, care for mothers and infants and aging, according to people who spoke anonymously with CNBC.

Of course, this effort would involve working through HIPAA rules, but it’s hard to imagine that a company like Amazon couldn’t buy and/or cultivate that expertise.

In the piece, writers Eugene Kim and Christina Farr argue that the mere existence of the health & wellness group is a clear sign that Amazon plans to bring Alexa to healthcare. As long as the Echo can share and upload data in a secure, HIPAA-compliant fashion, the possibilities are almost endless. In addition to sharing data with patients and clinicians, this would make it possible to integrate the data with secure third-party apps.

Of course, a 12-person unit is microscopic in size within a company like Amazon, and from that standpoint, the group might seem like a one-off experiment. On the other hand, its work seems more important when you consider the steps Amazon has already taken in the healthcare space.

The most conspicuous move Amazon has made in healthcare came in early 2018, when it announced a joint initiative with Berkshire Hathaway and J.P. Morgan focused on improving healthcare services. To date, the partnership hasn’t said much about its plans, but it’s hard to argue that something huge could emerge from bringing together players of this size.

In another, less conspicuous move, Alexa took a step towards competing in the diabetes care market. In the summer of 2017, working with Merck, Amazon offered a prize to developers building Alexa “skills” which could help people with diabetes manage all aspects of their care. One might argue that this kind of project could be more important than something big and splashy.

It’s worth noting at this point that even a monster like Google still hasn’t made bold moves in healthcare (though it does have extraordinarily ambitious plans). Amazon may not find it easy to compete. Still, it will certainly do some interesting things, and I’m eager to see them play out. In fact, I’m on the edge of my seat – aren’t you?

Despite Privacy Worries, Consumers Trust Apple With Their Health Data

Posted on August 14, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

These days, everyone seems to want access to consumer health data. We’re talking not just about healthcare companies, but also financial firms, insurance companies and technology giants like Apple, Google and Amazon.

Consumers have every reason to be concerned how their data is used, as companies outside of the healthcare realm, in particular, might use it in ways that make them uncomfortable. After all, these health-related companies may not have to follow HIPAA rules. Not only that, laws that govern data collection of any kind are still evolving on the state and federal level. It’s just not clear where privacy rules for health data are going.

Troubling ambiguities like these may be why 37% of the 1,000-plus people responding to a new Twitter poll said they wouldn’t share their data with anyone. Perhaps they’ve begun to realize that companies like Google could do a lot of harm if they act recklessly with the health data they’re accumulating.

Nonetheless, there’s at least one company they trust more than others with their PHI, according to the poll, which was conducted by a CNBC writer. That company is Apple, says columnist Christina Farr. When asked which companies they trust with the health data, 41% picked Apple. Meanwhile, Google and Amazon came in at 14% and 8% respectively. That’s a pretty big gap.

Why do consumers trust Apple more than other technology companies?  It’s far from clear. But Andrew Boyd, a professor of biomedical and health information sciences at the University of Illinois, suggests that it’s because Apple has taken steps to foster trust. “Apple has done a big push around health and privacy to breed familiarity and comfort,” Boyd told CNBC.

He noted that Apple has announced plans to make aggregated health information available on smartphones. Next, it plans to integrate other medical data, such as lab results, which usually aren’t part of an integrated health record, Farr points out. Apple has also promised users that it won’t sell health data to advertisers or third-party developers.

Ideally, other companies should be following in Apple’s footsteps, suggests health data privacy expert Lucia Savage, who responded to the Twitter poll.

Savage, who is currently serving as chief privacy and regulatory officer at Omada Health, believes that any company that collects health data should at least provide consumers with a summary of the data they collect on their users and promise not to sell it. (She didn’t say so directly, but we know most non-healthcare firms can’t be bothered with such niceties.)

I think we all look forward to the day when every company takes health data privacy seriously. But giants like Google, with effectively infinite resources, are still pushing the envelope, and we can only expect its competitors to do the same thing. Unless consumers mount a massive protest, or there’s a radical change in federal law, I suspect most non-healthcare firms will keep using health data however they please.

E-Patient Update:  Is Technology Getting Ahead Of Medical Privacy?

Posted on December 9, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I don’t know about y’all, but I love, love, love interacting with Google’s AI on my smartphone. It’s beyond convenient – it seems to simply read my mind and dish out exactly the content I needed.

That could have unwelcome implications, however, when you bear in mind that Google might be recording your question. Specifically, for a few years now, Google’s AI has apparently been recording users’ conversations whenever it is triggered. While Google makes no secret of the matter, and apparently provides directions on how to erase these recordings, it doesn’t affirmatively ask for your consent either — at least not in any terribly conspicuous way — though it might have buried the request in a block of legal language.

Now, everybody has a different tolerance for risk, and mine is fairly high. So unless an entity does something to suggest to me that it’s a cybercrook, I’m not likely to lose any sleep over the information it has harvested from my conversations. In my way of looking at the world, the odds that gathering such information will harm me are low, while the odds collection will help me are much greater. But I know that others feel much differently than myself.

For these reasons, I think it’s time to stop and take a look at whether we should regulate potential medical conversations with intermediaries like Google, whether or not they have a direct stake in the healthcare world. As this example illustrates, just because they’re neither providers, payers or business associates doesn’t mean they don’t manage highly sensitive healthcare information.

In thinking this over, my first reaction is to throw my hands in the air and give up. After all, how can we possibly track or regulate the flow of medical information falls outside the bounds of HIPAA or state privacy laws? How do we decide what behavior might constitute an egregious leak of medical information, and what could be seen as a mild mistake, given that the rules around provider and associate behavior may not apply? This is certainly a challenging problem.

But the more I consider these issues, the more I am convinced that we could at least develop some guidelines for handling of medical information by non-medical third parties, including what type of consumer disclosures are required when collecting data that might include healthcare information, what steps the intermediary takes to protect the data and how to opt out of data collection.

Given how complex these issues are, it’s unlikely we would succeed at regulating them effectively the first time, or even the fourth or fifth. And realistically, I doubt we can successfully apply the same standards to non-medical entities fielding health questions as we can to providers or business associates. That being said, I think we should pay more attention to such issues. They are likely to become more important, not less, as time goes by.

Apple App Store Toughens Guidelines For Health Apps

Posted on September 13, 2016 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

In a precedent-setting move, Apple has released new guidelines for its iOS App Store which impose new limitations on health and medical app developers.  iMedicalApps contributor Iltifat Husain, M.D., who wrote a piece about the changed standards, said they contain “the most stringent language I have ever seen Apple used for the health and medical category of apps.”

According to Husain, highlights from Apple’s new developer guidelines include:

  • A warning that if an app could possibly cause physical harm, Apple could reject it
  • A warning that apps which provide inaccurate data or information that could be used to diagnose or treat patients will get increased scrutiny
  • A reminder that apps which calculate drug dosage must come from the drug manufacturer, a hospital, university, health insurance company or other approved entity. In other words, independent developers cannot post a medical app for drug dosages themselves.
  • A ban on marijuana-related apps
  • A ban on apps that encourage people to place their iPhones under a mattress or pillow while charging (such as some sleep monitors)

Historically, Apple has been relatively lax about hosting potentially dangerous health apps, Husain says. For example, he notes that apps purporting to measure a consumer’s blood pressure by using the iPhone’s camera and microphone tend to be quite inaccurate in their measurements, but that Apple had not screened them out.  Now things have changed for the better, Husain writes. “Apps [like these] would not get through the screening review process under Apple’s new guidelines.”

Husain argues that the new guidelines are more important than the FDA’s recently-updated guidelines on health apps: “There is no way the FDA can regulate the hundreds of thousands of health and medical apps and the updates made to them,” Husain writes. “The screening process is what has to change.” And given Apple’s market footprint and influencer status it’s hard to disagree with him.

At this point the question is whether Google will follow suit. After all, while the Apple app store hosted 2 million apps as of June, Google Play offered 2.2 million apps, according to one study, and as of February there were three Android users for every iPhone user. So If Google doesn’t put more stringent health app requirements in place as well, creators of dodgy health apps can still develop for Android and find a wide audience.

That being said, neither Google nor Apple are required to impose new restrictions on health apps, and are likely to be governed by commercial pressure more than medical appropriateness. Also, both parties are free to set any rules they choose, and uses might not be aware of important differences between the two sets of policies. In other words, if the goal is to protect consumers, relying on guidelines generated by app store hosts probably won’t fly over the long-term.

I’m not necessarily suggesting that the FDA or other regulatory body should come down on the app stores like a ton of bricks. That would be overkill, and as Husain notes, is probably beyond their capabilities.

But doctors in the know about apps might want to warn patients about their potential limitations, and offer some criteria as to what they can expect from health apps. After all, most consumers have experimented with one health app of the other, so even if the doctor doesn’t prescribe them, patients need to be educated about their options. So if you’re a mobile health savvy clinician reading this, consider increasing patients on these issues.

What If Your Doctor Knew All Your Health Searches?

Posted on June 30, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Back in 2013, the Pew Research Internet Project found that 72% of internet users looked online for health information. This was well before the most recent update to Dr. Google. It’s only a matter of time that those health searches will end up going through some sort of AI solution (Siri, Alexa, Galaxy, etc) we bring into the home.

Imagine if we connected this font of health information and questions together with the healthcare establishment. What if your doctor had access to all of the health related searches you were doing? Might he be able to provide better service to you and your family?

Yes, I realize that this idea will be extremely controversial. There are some major privacy challenges and issues with this idea, but there’s also a lot of potential benefits. It seems a little bit hypocritical that we ask doctors to be open and transparent with our health records if we as patients aren’t going to be open and transparent with our medical concerns. Certainly, we should be able to control what and with whom we share this information, but I believe that many will be willing to share it with their doctors.

Yes, this will require a pretty dramatic shift in how our medical professionals will handle a patient visit. However, if I’ve been doing a bunch of searches around back pain, imagine how much different my visit to the doctor for an earache would be. Could that provide the opportunity for the doctor to talk to me about my back pain searches?

It’s fascinating to think how this is almost the complete opposite of the office visit today. I’ve seen doctors that wanted to only deal with one issue at a time. Those doctors have learned the special dance that allows them to avoid talking about more than the presenting concern. Many doctors learn essentially a new language that makes sure that they get in and out of the exam room quickly without bringing up the rabbit hole of potential health problems a patient might be actually experiencing.

That’s the reality of today’s medicine. This is what we pay them to do. That’s changing with things like CCM where a healthcare provider is paid to dig in a little deeper. It’s certainly not enough to fully change these behaviors.

Until the reimbursement fully changes over to doctors getting paid to keep you healthy, a doctor knowing your health searches won’t be of interest to most doctors. However, once reimbursement changes, a doctor will become much more interested in what’s really ailing you. Your online searches certainly will say a lot about your health, both physical and mental.

April Fool’s Day – Health IT Edition

Posted on April 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you know that I love a good April Fool’s day joke. I don’t like those that hurt people, but I love good humor (ask me about the time my wife said she was going into labor and wasn’t). You may remember my past years’ pranks about the #HIT100 Health IT Company, the ONC Reality TV show, and my personal favorite where we announced we’d be selling our own EHR software. Good memories all around.

This year I’ve been busy organizing the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy other people’s work. I’m sure I’ve missed some of the great health IT related April Fool’s day jokes, so let me know of others in the comments.

The big winner for April Fool’s 2016 for me was SnapChart from Twine Health. You’ll particularly enjoy it if you’re a SnapChat user, but it’s a great one either way. This video should demonstrate what I mean:

Well done Twine Health! I think even patient privacy advocates would appreciate SnapChart. “We all know that EHRs suck. Well this EHR only sucks for 7 seconds….BOOM”

Another honorable mention goes to Epic who has a long standing tradition of offering something entertaining on April Fool’s Day:
Epic April Fool's Day 2016
*Click on the image to see a larger version

Nice work by Epic to keep it topical with reference to Clinton and Sanders. However, the one that takes the cake is Jonathan Bush using MyChart. The only thing that would make me laugh more would be if athenahealth put out a video response from Jonathan Bush. Please?!

Cureatr decided to go old school with a new technology called the Faxenatr:

Howard Green, MD posted this announcement from Alphabet Inc and Google Inc’s company Verily Life Sciences about the UHIT (Universal Health Information Technology).

So many others I could mention outside of health IT. This one from Samsung about a 3D holographic projection was cool:


Although, when you look at what’s happening with VR, maybe it will be more reality than we realize.

Gmail’s Mic Drop is pretty funny. Well, at least it was until people starting losing their job because of it. The concept of a mic drop on email or social media is pretty interesting though. I wonder if there’s a way you could really implement something like it.

What other April Fool’s day jokes have you seen. It’s Friday. We all need a good laugh.

How Can Wearable Gadgets Like the Smartwatch Help Heart Patients?

Posted on June 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The following is a guest blog post by Kelly Everson.
Kelly Everson
Wearable tech and its purpose

Wearable tech is no more a thing of future times; it’s here, and it can help many people regarding health issues. Go to any store or just go online, and you will realize that fitness bands and smartwatches are all around you. But you are no expert; how will you decide what to buy? How will you know the choice you made will help you with the issue you are confronted?

Well, that all depends on what you need and at what price. Not every single device is the same, even though they look very similar. Wearable technology can be fun in some cases and useful in others. The wearable category is still being developed and each day we can witness a new band or something of the sort.

Up till now, smartwatches have had quite a good impact on personal safety and in the wellness area. The impact related to health has not been very big, but a lot is happening and will continue to happen.

Various giant companies such as Google, Apple, Baidu, and Samsung are working on health platforms. They can aggregate info from different sources and wearables, and promise to gather highly valuable insights based on sets of data.

How to choose a smart band or a smartwatch?

Think about the design, and does it appeal to you. You will also have to find out does the device support a Bluetooth, and what operating system it supports. If you plan to swim while wearing it, it should be waterproof, or at least swim-friendly. It is also very important that the device has a solid battery life and. Search and discover what apps does it run, and are those apps the ones you need. Some devices have screens that are always on, while other don’t. That feature consumes a lot of power and drains the battery, so keep that in mind. You should check if the device supports heart rate monitor and at what level.

Smartwatches and patients with heart problems

Smartwatches are supposed to play a very important role in medicine, especially for patients with heart problems, here is why:

  • Continuous monitoring of heart rate and other bodily functions

That will help patients in many ways. Monitoring of heart rate and movement has become state of the art in some of the latest releases of smartwatches, but some other parameters have improved as well. Now people can monitor their blood sugar, blood pressure, nutrition, temperature and more.  In the upcoming releases of smartwatches, some other parameters will be introduced. Patients with heart problems will benefit the most, as they are the most endangered group.

  • Therapy

Heart patients as said before are the most endangered group and need the most care. Based on diagnostics and monitoring we can conclude that certain wearables will be used solely for therapy. Some smartwatches will have a function of delivering drugs at the right context and time. There are many such programs under way and have received a few million dollars of funding to make it a reality.

  • Specific group of patients and corresponding tools

Just think about a specific smartwatch apps for patients with heart problems, or those who suffer from diabetes, blindness, deafness, epilepsy, lung issues and so on and so on. Hundreds of applications are in development as we speak around the world, and have a great potential for the mentioned group of patients.

  • Patient records in an electronic form

Smartwatches seem to be a fantastic key for electronic patient records. They are great for recording health data and are on you all the time, even in a case of an emergency. Users will have total control over who gets access to what information and in which particular situation.

What’s next?

Even though the benefits are obvious and splendid, years will pass until smartwatches can reveal their full potential within the medical area. A lot of scientific data will be needed to conquer regulatory hurdles and to get compensated by the systems of health care. Also, people will have to be confident that their details are secure.

Even though, it will take time, by 2020 smartwatches are going to be indispensable and extremely valuable tool throughout a vast number of health care settings.

About Kelly Everson
Kelly Everson is MA in English Literature and an American Author. Her work comprises of articles appearing or forthcoming in over a dozen health care websites and global internet magazine covering technology, future gadgets, beauty skin care and overall men’s & women’s health. When she’s not educating strangers with her writing, she’s most likely researching about new discoveries in technology, health, fitness and beauty industry. Connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

Top 10 Google Searches in 2014 – What Would Be Healthcare IT’s Top Searches?

Posted on December 16, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year Google releases it’s top trending searches in the US and the world. This list isn’t the most frequently searched terms (according to Google the most popular searches don’t change) but is a year versus year comparison of what terms were trending in 2014.

US Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
Flappy Bird
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
ISIS
Ferguson
Frozen
Ukraine

Global Trending Searches:
Robin Williams
World Cup
Ebola
Malaysia Airlines
ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
Flappy Bird
Conchita Wurst
ISIS
Frozen
Sochi Olympics

Pretty interesting look into 2014. Also amazing that a mobile app (Flappy Bird) made the list for the first time. There’s two healthcare terms: Ebola and ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. I wondered what this list would look like for healthcare IT. So, I decide to take a guess at what I think would be the trending healthcare IT terms of 2014:

ICD-10 Delay
EHR Penalties
Wearables
Meaningful Use Stage 2
Epic
Obamacare
FHIR
Cerner-Siemens
HIPAA Breaches
Patient Engagement

What do you think of the list? Would you order it differently? Are there terms you think should be on the list?