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Talking Genomic Medicine at #CES2016

Posted on January 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was lucky to moderate a panel at the Digital Health Summit at CES 2016. The session was called “Look Who’s Talking: Newborn Genomic Data Enables Precision Medicine” and I was joined by 2 amazing panelists:

  • Andy De, Global Managing Director and General Manager for Healthcare and Life Sciences at Tableau
  • Aaron Black, Director, Informatics, Inova Translational Medicine Institute

It’s amazing to see the work Andy and Aaron are doing with genomic medicine. It’s truly uncharted territory and we’re still discovering what’s going to be possible. However, I think we do a good job looking at some of the things that are reality today in genomic medicine.

Check out all of the healthcare IT conferences we attend throughout the year.

Talking Digital Health at CES on MedHeads

Posted on January 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was invited by the good people at MedCity News to join their weekly MedHeads video chat to talk about Digital Health at CES. It was a great chat about some of the things myself and Stephanie Baum found at CES. Plus, Chris Seper and Neil Versel talked about what they saw watching from home. Check it out in the video embedded below.

Of course, the challenge was we only had 30 minutes to talk about the 2.5 million square feet of of exhibit space and ~20,000 new products that were unveiled at the show. Chew on those numbers a little bit.

Plus, while what’s happening on the show floor is great, there’s also hundreds of thousands of meetings that happen over dinners and drinks and that’s where the most exciting stuff happens. For example, Philips put on an incredible dinner Wednesday night of CES that had a whose who in the Digital Health space. I had a similar experience at the Digital Health Summit Speaker dinner last night. The bringing together of these like minded businesses is a really powerful thing.

You’ll never guess the theme of both dinner events: Collaboration! There was a real sense by those in attendance that we can’t accomplish what we need to alone. We need each other to be successful. The first step to making that happen is meeting each other and learn about what each of us is doing. CES presented an amazing opportunity for doing just that.

Amazingly, there are still 2 more days left of CES. Today and tomorrow I’m looking to hit more of the startup area (Eureka Park) and the main show floor at the Las Vegas convention center. Much more to come!

Digital Health Video Blab from #CES2016

Posted on January 5, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

UPDATE: We had trouble finding a good internet connection at the event, so the blab didn’t work out well. However, on Friday of the event (from home), I took part in the MedHeads video chat about CES:

This week I’m excited to be attending the massive (170,000+ people) CES conference in Las Vegas. The amount of digital health at the conference is really astounding and exciting. You can check out some of our other CES Digital Health coverage on EMR and HIPAA.

On January 6th, 2016 at 2:30 PM PT (5:30 PM ET), I’m going to be a live video blab with Dr. Nick van Terheyden, CMO at Dell, from CES 2016. We’d love to have you join us and learn about what’s happening at CES and ask us anything you want. Just bookmark this page and the video blab will go live tomorrow.

I’ll also be taking part in the Digital Health Summit at CES. I’m told they’re doing a video recording of my session, so I’ll share that on Healthcare Scene in the future.

Digital Therapies for Healthcare

Posted on December 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was recently talking to Paulo Machado about what digital health was happening at the CES conference in Las Vegas (see my full schedule of Health Care IT Conferences and Events). Over the 10 years I’ve been going to the event, digital health has really grown at CES. Plus, it has its own subsection called the Digital Health Summit. I’ll actually be speaking at CES as part of a panel on genomics called “Look Who’s Talking: Newborn Genomic Data Enables Precision Medicine” which is happening January 7th, 2:15 PM – 2:40 PM if you’d like to attend.

As I was talking about digital health at CES, I learned that Paulo is now CEO of an evidence based digital therapy company. I’ve long loved the concept of evidence based digital therapies and I was glad to see someone like Paulo working on them. For those not familiar with digital therapies, here’s a look at the top 3 companies in the space:

Claritas Mindsciences
Claritas MindsSciences designs evidence based digital therapies that empower people to manage their cravings and addictions. Dr. Judson Brewer founded the company when he was leading Yale’s Therapeutic Neuroscience Clinic. Our digital solutions deliver evidence-based mindfulness training in a personalized, cost effective & scalable fashion. Our first product, Craving to Quit is a 21 session smoking cessation program based on an NIH funded randomized controlled clinical trials which showed that our approach was twice as effective as gold standard treatment at the end of therapy and was >5x as effective at week 17 with a quit rate of 31%. Healthy Eating and Opioid/Drug addiction solutions will be launched in 2016.

Omada Health
Omada works with employer and health plan customers to provide scalable, effective, and evidence-based behavioral interventions for those at risk for heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. Combining proven behavioral science and the clinically-meaningful results for a tipping point population – those most at-risk for developing obesity-related chronic diseases. Omada operates on a pay-for-outcomes pricing model that eliminates risk for enterprise customers, and is helping drive the company’s growth in the marketplace.

WellDoc
WellDoc is a digital health technology company that develops mobile solutions to drive behavioral and clinical change in chronic disease. WellDoc’s goal is to improve patient self-management and help physicians overcome gaps in the delivery system to improve clinical outcomes and decrease cost. WellDoc has commercialized the first mobile prescription therapy, BlueStar®, for adults with type 2 diabetes. Mobile prescription therapy fills the support gap between patients and providers during the 8700 hours that individuals are living their lives outside the healthcare system. WellDoc has a proven track record of contributing published, peer-reviewed clinical evidence since 2008 and in June 2015 presented real-world patient engagement and clinical outcomes at the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) 75th Scientific Session. BlueStar is recognized by the ADA on its website as the first and only in the new class of diabetes treatment known as Mobile Prescription Therapy.

I’m sure there are other companies that are working on digital therapies. Please share them in the comments. It’s time we spend a lot more time learning about these companies since companies like these are going to transform health care as we know it.

Wearables Explosion at CES 2015

Posted on January 8, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Each year I’ve been impressed by the growth of Digital Health at CES. However, this year has blown me away far more than any year before. In previous years, the health presence was so small that it was almost indistinguishable. In fact, it was so small that it was really easy for it to double and triple in size. Now that it’s gotten much bigger, it’s still doubling in size and the impact is even greater.

The space for Digital Health takes up a very large portion of the Sands Convention Center (Venetian Hotel) this year and that’s saying something for how large it’s really become. Plus, many of the booths were massive in scale. That’s not something we’d really seen at previous CES conferences in the Digital Health space.

Here’s one example of the massive iFit booth:
Wearable Fitness Booth at CES 2015

Yes, there’s basically a full stage for their booth with half a dozen people dancing and working out at their booth. Plus, after the dance performance, they are paying other models (I guess that’s what you’d call them) to work out on the equipment as well. It was quite the spectacle and the picture barely does it justice. (UPDATE: You can also check out this video of the Digital Health space at CES I did.)

In my initial CES Observations post on EMR and HIPAA, I commented on the number of new wearables, the beginning of ambient sensors with wearables, and the variety of new “jewelry” like wearables. Yes, there was a Swarovski jewelry booth right next to the Misfit booth.

On the other side of the equation were booth like the HP Matters booth:
HP Healthcare Booth at CES 2015

They had three images which talk about Healthcare in a Box (telemedicine), Data Analytics is Not Just a Buzzword, and Medical 3D Printing Comes of Age. I’m not sure how many people would have thought HP for any of these three areas.

I also found it really great that CES put the Health & Wellness, Digital Health and Fitness, Robotics, and 3D printing areas all right next to each other. No doubt there are a bunch of interesting robotic and 3D printing applications for healthcare.

While I’ve started to see a maturing of the devices and sensors at CES, I’m still waiting for a breakthrough company that does something powerful with all of this new found data. There are still a few edge cases where a Fitbit will help you lose weight by just encouraging you to reach a 10k step goal. Or the calorie counting app which makes you more aware of the food you’re eating. Those have their place in the current ecosystem, but that’s not really leveraging the data into a seamless change for people’s lives. In many ways, we needed all these sensors to mature to the point that we can innovate on top of all that data. Hopefully we’ll see more of it next year.

I did see one partial example of that this year. Fitbug has put together these Kiqplan programs. They’re essentially 12 week programs that try and address real problems that people are trying to solve: Slim + Trim, Beer Belly Blaster, Healthy Baby Bump, and Goodbye Baby Bump. In many ways this is just packaging, but I believe we need this type of packaging in order to attract people to using it. No doubt this is a simple first evolution, but I’d like to see where it goes.

No doubt wearables that relate to health and fitness have exploded at CES. However, I think we’re still just at the very beginning of seeing the amazing results from these wearable devices. The foundation is laid. Now we need to put up some walls and make it look nice.

The Growth of mHealth at International CES 2015

Posted on December 31, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

International CES (Consumer Electronics Show) is just around the corner. My inbox has been innundated with emails from PR people interested in showing me the latest and great mobile health technologies at the show. I haven’t seen the final numbers on growth of the health portion yet, but I can assure you it’s going to be bigger than it’s ever been before.

The biggest trend I think we’re going to see this year is we’re going to see a lot of health applications outside of the Digital Health Summit section of the conference. A lot of the device makers are integrating some sort of health application into their devices and so I’ll just as easily be able to go up to the Samsung booth and talk mobile health as I will be able to do in the health specific section of the conference. I think that’s a sign of where mobile health applications are heading. They’re quickly just becoming a part of the overall ecosystem.

With that said, I’m going to be watching 2 main areas of applications:

Wearables – This is the obvious one. I won’t be able to turn my head at the health section of CES without being inundated with some sort of wearable. CES is known for having too many iPhone case companies exhibiting. You literally start to tune them out because there are so many. I wonder if I’ll start to do the same with wearables. Luckily, most wearables have more points of differentiation than iPhone cases. Or do they? I’m certain I’m going to find out.

Robotics and Telemedicine – This is something that’s been popular the past year or two at CES. I expect it will be even more popular this year. The mixture of robotics with Telemedicine is powerful in healthcare and also with caregivers. I’ll be interested to see if these have really made any progress or if they’re just pedaling more or less that same offerings as previous years.

Those are a few things I’ll be watching for at CES next week. if you’ll be at the event, I’d love to see you there.

Digital Health at CES

Posted on December 2, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those not familiar with CES (Consumer Electronics show, which they prefer I call International CES), it’s the mecca of consumer electronics in Las Vegas each January. It’s only held in Las Vegas, because it’s the only city big enough to hold such a HUGE show.

I’m sure that many of you are thinking you’ve been to big conferences before. I’m pretty sure that there is no other conference in the world as big as CES. It’s amazing to see the millions of dollars vendors have spent on their booth (millions for just one booth for those keeping track at home). It’s literally a circus and who doesn’t enjoy the circus?

I’ve been going to CES for about the past 8 or so years. When I first started attending, I attended as a techguy interested in the tech side of things. However, over the years, the Digital Health section of CES has really grown and matured. In fact, I just got a message that the Digital Health Exhibit space has grown 40 percent over last year. Last year it felt like it grew 50% as well. Needless to say, there is a lot of attention being placed on the Digital Health space at CES and around the world.

I won’t get to see much of the CES technology until January, but I’m excited to see what’s new. A lot of companies bring out their best stuff at CES, but it’s also possible that I’ll just get to see the same players with bigger booths. I’ll be sure to report on the experience.

If you’re going to be at CES in Las Vegas, I’d love to meet and chat.

Telemedicine Panel at CES Hosted by HealthSpot

Posted on January 9, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I had the chance to attend a Telemedicine panel today at CES that was put together by HealthSpot (see my previous post about HealthSpot at CES). They put together a good panel that included:
Peter Tippett, MD, PHD – Vice President, Connected Healthcare Solutions, Verizon
John F. Jesser – Vice President, Health Care Management, WellPoint
William Wulf, M.D. — Central Ohio Primary Care
Leslie Kelly Hall — Healthwise

The panel was an interesting discussion, but I think the underlying discussion really centered around how screwed up many parts of healthcare are right now. This showed itself in two different ways. One was that telemedicine could possibly fix some of those screwed up parts of healthcare. Second, telemedicine is actually hard to execute because of some of the screwed up parts of healthcare. It’s kind of odd to look at it that way.

I tweeted a number of the comments that struck me and so I thought I’d share them here for those who weren’t following along on Twitter.


This was a fitting comment at a “consumer” electronics show.


I think there are still some wackos;-), but I think the message they send is clear.


This would be a monumental achievement if we can embrace HIPAA and make the technology happen. I think the key message is: HIPAA should not be used as an excuse.


Such a no brainer question with an easy answer. Why is it so hard to do?


Will telemedicine become the “standard of care” so that this becomes a big issue? I hope we don’t reach the point that this is the reason we implement telemedicine, but it might take something like it to get people off the proverbial couch.

Healthcare IT at CES and Digital Health Summit

Posted on January 3, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As most of you know, I attend quite a few healthcare IT conferences. This is aided by many great conferences coming to my hometown of Las Vegas. Next week this happens again when the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) happens in Las Vegas. If you thought HIMSS was big, you should attend CES to see what big really is. CES is insane. It’s so large that I think that Las Vegas is the only convention city that can support its size. CES takes over both the Las Vegas Convention Center and the Sands Convention Center and that’s just for the official show.

I’ve been attending CES ever since I moved to Las Vegas about 7 years ago. At first I mostly attended CES to enjoy the “circus.” I’d just walk onto the CES show floor and get lost in the flashing lights, incredible products, showy booths, and just about everything else you could imagine on an exhibit floor. It was always a fun experience and I’d always happen upon something healthcare IT related in my wanderings.

A couple years ago, CES started to create essentially mini-conferences within the larger CES conference. One of those focuses was healthcare IT and was called the Digital Health Summit. Since those small beginnings the digital health portion of CES has grown into a really interesting place to see various consumer health IT products.

The Digital Health Summit is broken into two areas. First, they have the educational programming piece which is 2 days of digital health panels. You can see the full Digital Health Summit agenda here. One thing I love about the Digital Health Summit is that it’s not the regular healthcare IT speakers. In fact, in many cases it is people who you won’t find at other healthcare IT conferences you might attend. So, you’re guaranteed to hear some different perspectives on healthcare IT that you hadn’t heard before. Plus, they bring in big names like Arianna Huffington, Sanjay Gupta, and Deepak Chopra MD.

The second part of the Digital Health Summit is a section of the CES show floor that is focused on digital health. Each year I’ve attended the Digital Health section of CES has grown larger and larger. It’s usually an interesting mix of devices, exercise equipment, healthcare companies (like United Health Group), and other amazing healthcare technology (like the Genetic sequencer at last year’s CES). I even found an EHR company at CES one year. It seems that healthcare devices are really coming into their own this year and so I expect the exhibit hall to be stock full of the latest medical devices.

I’m sure I’ll be tweeting from CES on @ehrandhit when I find cool things. Plus, I’m sure I’ll capture a picture or two of the craziness that is CES (like the guy last year who was doing double back flips on a trampoline wearing skis).

If you’re going to be at CES, let me know. I always love meeting people at the event and enjoying the craziness together.

Healthcare IT at CES

Posted on January 19, 2012 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

While I definitely had quite a bit of excitement over this year’s CES and Digital Health Summit, I have to admit that I ended up leaving CES a bit disappointed. I’m trying to decide if it being the fifth year I’ve attended CES is making me immune to the hype that surrounds the event or if I’ve just been going to too many conferences in general and so I’ve already heard much of the hype. At the end of the day, I describe this year’s CES as incremental versus trans formative.

There were a few exceptions of things that caught my eye while navigating the CES circus that are worth mentioning.

Ion Proton Genetic Sequencer
Probably the most amazing thing I saw for healthcare was the Life Technologies Ion Proton Genetic Sequencer. Plus, I’m not alone with this feeling. Dan Costa of PC Mag called it “The Coolest Thing I Saw at CES 2012.” To be quite frank, it is pretty amazing. It’s part of the amazing movement happening in bringing genomic data to healthcare.

The Ion Proton Genetic Sequencer (they need a better name) is awesome cause you can do a full genome in a day on a machine that costs about the same as an MRI machine. Plus, I personally think they’re just getting started on optimizing the technology. As they continue to improve the technology the cost of the machine and the time and cost to do the analysis will continue to drop. We still don’t know exactly how to use the genomic data in healthcare, but machines like this are going to make it possible for us to find new ways to use this data for good.

I still can’t help but imagine an EHR having all of our genomic data available to it.

Liquipel
Probably the coolest general technology and innovation that I saw at CES was called Liquipel. Liquipel is a technology that makes your device repel water using a nano coating. The best way to understand how it works is to check out some of the Liquipel videos and I’ll embed one below that gives a nice overview.

Of course, they have the disclaimer that it should never be submerged in water, but it was amazing to see it repel the water and still work. Plus, probably the coolest demonstration they did was with a Kleenex. They’d applied the nano-coating to a Kleenex and then they placed it in water. You’d think it would shrivel up and absorb the water. Nothing. I then asked if I could touch the Kleenex to see if I could feel the coating. Nothing. It felt like a Kleenex.

Many health IT people would love this technology. Then, it wouldn’t be such a concern to put your iPad next to the sink in the exam room. I wonder if the nano technology can do anything with infection control with devices. I imagine it doesn’t solve that issue.

I’m sure many are wondering how they can get their device treated with Liquipel. Right now they said you have to drop it by their office in California to get it done over a lunch or something. However, they’re working with phone manufacturers to get their technology in every phone. Pretty amazing stuff.

John Sculley
Another highlight of CES for me was the chance to hear John Sculley talk at the Digital Health Summit. I can’t say he said anything too groundbreaking. Although, he did say that health IT companies should stop focusing their revenue model on corporate health programs. I found that interesting. The most interesting comment came from colleague Dan Munro after John Sculley’s talk. He commented how interesting it was that so many of these older ex-CIO’s of major tech companies are getting into healthcare. I carried the thought through for Dan that as you age, you start to care about healthcare a lot more than you did when you were younger and healthier. I wonder if we’ll see this trend continue as more tech people get older and start to care more about healthcare.