Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

Consumer Data Liquidity – The Road So Far, The Road Ahead – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 23, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/25 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Greg Meyer (@Greg_Meyer93) on the topic of “Consumer Data Liquidity – The Road So Far, The Road Ahead.”

As my summer tour of interoperability forums, lectures, and webinars winds down, patient engagement/data liquidity is arguably the hottest talk in town.  This leads me to a time of reflection looking back to my own personal experience over the last 10-15 years (yes, I’m still a fairly young guy) starting with early attempts to access my own family’s records, moving on to witnessing the consumer revolution of Dave deBronkart and Regina Holiday, and finally tracking the progression of HealthIT and public health legislation.  We’ve come a long way from the ubiquity of paper and binders and Xerox (oh my) to CDs and PDFs to most recently CDAs, Direct, and FHIR with the latter paving the way for a new breed of apps and tools.

With the lightning speed of change in technology and disruption vis-à-vis consumer devices, one would expect a dramatic shift in the consumer experience over the past 10 years with nirvana in the not too distant future.  Contrary to intuitive thinking, we haven’t come as far as we would like to think.  Even with legislation and a progression of technology such as C-CDA, OpenNotes, Direct, BlueButton, FHIR, and the promise of apps to bring it all together, pragmatically a lot of same the core broken processes and frustrations still exist today.  In July, ONC released a study on the health records request process based on a small sampling of consumers and 50 large health organizations.  Although most of the stories include modern technical capabilities, the processes reek of variance and inefficiencies that have persisted since the long lost days of the house call.

Not to put the whole state of affairs in gloom, there is still a potentially bright future not too far ahead.  With the convergence of forces from contemporary technical standards and recent legislation like the 21st Century Cures Act, consumer data liquidity is staying in the forefront of public health.  And let’s not forget the consumer.  It is partly because of the consumer revolution and patients demanding portability of their records that is forcing providers and vendors to open their systems as platforms of accessibility instead of fostering silos and walled gardens.

This week’s chat will explore the progression of health data access from the consumer’s perspective.

Here are the questions that will serve as the framework for this week’s #HITsm chat:
T1: Describe your perception/experiences of consumer data access 10-15 years ago. #HITsm

T2: Contrast your previous experience to today. Is your experience better, worse, or the same? #HITsm

T3: What gaps exist between what is available today (data, apps, networks, etc.) vs what you would like to have? #HITsm

T4: Would you prefer to manage/move your data yourself or expect HealthIT to do it for you. #HITsm

T5: Beyond FHIR, APIs, and apps, what is the future of consumer access and data liquidity? #HITsm

Bonus: Remember “Gimme My DaM Data?” What would be your slogan for consumer access? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/1 – Digital Strategies for Improving Consumer Experience
Hosted by Kyra Hagan (@HIT_Mktg_Maven from @InfluenceHlth)

9/8 – Digital Health Innovation in Pharma
Hosted by Naomi Fried (@naomifried

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Submit and Vote on BlueButton Ideas

Posted on June 12, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At Health Datapalooza, Health Tech Hatch announced the Blue Button CoDesign Challenge. Certainly we’ve seen hundreds of challenges come out over the past couple years, but this challenge is a bit different.

Most challenges provide a prize for some goal and then teams of people get together to create a product or service that helps achieve that goal. In the BlueButton CoDesign Challenge they’re starting by asking patients the question, “Build me a Blue Button-enabled tool that….” So far 74 ideas have been submitted as answers to that question. Hundreds of comments have been added on each idea and thousands have voted on which idea has the most potential.

I do have some concern with how they’re doing the voting. I think it’s a mistake to display how many votes each idea has, because then it skews people’s future vote. The same goes for listing the top ideas on the home page. That encourages the casual visitor to just vote on the top ideas which gives the top ideas an unfair advantage. Plus, if someone like me tweets out my idea and gets my followers to vote for me, then I automatically skew to the top page. In fact, this voting reminds me a bit of the upper right quadrant syndrome that Jonathan Bush talked about at TEDMED.

Of course, there are always issues when you deal with voting. However, I love the idea of getting the patient crowd involved in sharing their ideas of how to make healthcare better. For example, e-Patient Dave offered this great idea on managing the pills you take. He’s right that all of the data is there, so why hasn’t someone built it? The answer is likely that it’s not the focus of the people that have the data. This is why EHR APIs are so important.

Just reading through the list of ideas is quite inspiring. I’ll be interested to see which ideas win and if any developers jump on board to build those ideas. The problem with most people is that they’d rather build their own ideas than someone else’s.