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“Shadow” Devices Expose Networks To New Threats

Posted on June 4, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new report by security vendor Infoblox suggests that threats posed by “shadow” personal devices connected to healthcare networks are getting worse.

The study, which looks at healthcare organizations in the US, UK, Germany, and UAE, notes that the average organization has thousands of personal devices connected to their enterprise network. Including personal laptops, Kindles and mobile phones.

Employees from the US and the UK report using personal devices connected to their enterprise network for multiple activities, including social media use (39%), downloading apps (24%), games (13%) and films (7%), the report says.

It would be bad enough if these pastimes only consumed network resources and time, but the problem goes far beyond that. Use of these shadow devices can open up healthcare networks to nasty attacks. For example, social media is increasingly a vector of malware infection, where bad actors launch attacks successfully urging them to download unfamiliar files.

Health IT directors responding to the study also said there were a significant number of non-business IoT devices connected to their network including fitness trackers (49%), digital assistants like Amazon Alexa (47%), smart TVs (46%), smart kitchen devices such as connected kettles of microwaves (33%) and game consoles such as the Xbox or PlayStation (30%).

In many cases, exploits can take total control of these devices, with serious potential consequences. For example, one can turn a Samsung Smart TV into a live microphone and other smart TVs could be used to steal data and install unwanted apps.

Of course. IT directors aren’t standing around and ignoring these threats and have developed policies for dealing with them. But the report argues that their security policies for connected devices aren’t as effective as they think. For example, while 88% of the IT leaders surveyed said their security policy was either effective or very effective, employees didn’t even know it was in effect in many cases.

In addition, 85% of healthcare organizations have also increased their cybersecurity spending over the past year, and 12% of organizations have increased it by over 50%. Most HIT leaders appear to be focused on traditional solutions, including antivirus software (60%) and cybersecurity investments (57%). In addition, more than half of US healthcare IT professionals said their company invests in encryption software.

Also, about one-third of healthcare IT professionals said the company is investing in employee education (35%), email security solutions and threat intelligence (30%). One in five were investing in biometric solutions.

Ultimately, what this report makes clear is that health IT organizations need to reduce the number of unauthorized personal devices connected to their network. Nearly any other strategy just puts a band-aid on a gaping wound.

Alexa, Can You Heal Me Now? The Power of Voice Assistant Technology in Healthcare

Posted on January 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Nathan Treloar, President and COO at Orbita. In our discussion, we’ll be diving into voice assistant technology in healthcare including the breakout hit from Amazon known as Alexa. This has so much potential in healthcare. Join us as we talk about Alexa and other voice assistant technologies in healthcare and how more organizations can leverage voice assistant technology in their product offerings.

The great part is that you can join my conversation live and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask your own questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of this post or you can watch on YouTube directly. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

About Nathan Treloar
Nate Treloar is co-founder and president of Orbita, which provides the first secure (HIPAA-compliant) cloud-based platform for creating and managing digital home healthcare applications. Previously, he held key executive positions at FAST Search, Microsoft, RAMP, and, Ektron. He is a respected expert and speaker on consumer IoT trends, search, text and data mining, content management, and knowledge management and has advised hundreds of the world’s largest companies and government agencies on their applications.

We hope you’ll join us live using the video below or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation.


(To Ask Questions, visit the YouTube page)

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.