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An Interesting Overview Of Alphabet’s Healthcare Investments

Posted on June 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Recently I’ve begun reading a blog called The Medical Futurist which offers some very interesting fare. In addition to some intriguing speculation, it includes some research that I haven’t seen anywhere else. (It is written by a physician named Bertalan Mesko.)

In this case, Mesko has buried a shrewd and well-researched piece on Alphabet’s healthcare investments in an otherwise rambling article. (The rambling part is actually pretty interesting on its own, by the way.)

The piece offers a rather comprehensive update on Alphabet’s investments in and partnerships with healthcare-related companies, suggesting that no other contender in Silicon Valley is investing in this sector heavily as Alphabet’s GV (formerly Google Ventures). I don’t know if he’s right about this, but it’s probably true.

By Mesko’s count, GV has backed almost 60 health-related enterprises since the fund was first kicked off in 2009. These investments include direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andme, health insurance company Oscar Health, telemedicine venture Doctor on Demand and Flatiron Health, which is building an oncology-focused data platform.

Mesko also points out that GV has had an admirable track record so far, with five of the companies it first backed going public in the last year. I’m not sure I agree that going public is per se a sign of success — a lot depends on how the IPO is received by Wall Street– but I see his logic.

In addition, he notes that Alphabet is stocking up on intellectual resources. The article cites research by Ernest & Young reporting that Alphabet filed 186 healthcare-related patents between 2013 and 2017.

Most of these patents are related to DeepMind, which Google acquired in 2014, and Verily Life Sciences (formerly Google Life Sciences). While these deals are interesting in and of themselves, on a broader level the patents demonstrate Alphabet’s interest in treating chronic illnesses like diabetes and the use of bioelectronics, he says.

Meanwhile, Verily continues to work on a genetic data-collecting initiative known as the Baseline Study. It plans to leverage this data, using some of the same algorithms behind Google’s search technology, to pinpoint what makes people healthy.

It’s a grand and somewhat intimidating picture.

Obviously, there’s a lot more to discuss here, and even Mesko’s in-depth piece barely scratches the surface of what can come out of Alphabet and Google’s health investments. Regardless, it’s worth keeping track of their activity in the sector even if you find it overwhelming. You may be working for one of those companies someday.

April Fool’s Day – Health IT Edition

Posted on April 1, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most of you know that I love a good April Fool’s day joke. I don’t like those that hurt people, but I love good humor (ask me about the time my wife said she was going into labor and wasn’t). You may remember my past years’ pranks about the #HIT100 Health IT Company, the ONC Reality TV show, and my personal favorite where we announced we’d be selling our own EHR software. Good memories all around.

This year I’ve been busy organizing the Health IT Marketing and PR Conference, but that doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy other people’s work. I’m sure I’ve missed some of the great health IT related April Fool’s day jokes, so let me know of others in the comments.

The big winner for April Fool’s 2016 for me was SnapChart from Twine Health. You’ll particularly enjoy it if you’re a SnapChat user, but it’s a great one either way. This video should demonstrate what I mean:

Well done Twine Health! I think even patient privacy advocates would appreciate SnapChart. “We all know that EHRs suck. Well this EHR only sucks for 7 seconds….BOOM”

Another honorable mention goes to Epic who has a long standing tradition of offering something entertaining on April Fool’s Day:
Epic April Fool's Day 2016
*Click on the image to see a larger version

Nice work by Epic to keep it topical with reference to Clinton and Sanders. However, the one that takes the cake is Jonathan Bush using MyChart. The only thing that would make me laugh more would be if athenahealth put out a video response from Jonathan Bush. Please?!

Cureatr decided to go old school with a new technology called the Faxenatr:

Howard Green, MD posted this announcement from Alphabet Inc and Google Inc’s company Verily Life Sciences about the UHIT (Universal Health Information Technology).

So many others I could mention outside of health IT. This one from Samsung about a 3D holographic projection was cool:


Although, when you look at what’s happening with VR, maybe it will be more reality than we realize.

Gmail’s Mic Drop is pretty funny. Well, at least it was until people starting losing their job because of it. The concept of a mic drop on email or social media is pretty interesting though. I wonder if there’s a way you could really implement something like it.

What other April Fool’s day jokes have you seen. It’s Friday. We all need a good laugh.