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What Will 5G Mean for Healthcare?

Posted on May 29, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The above tweet also included an image, but I decided it was too disturbing to embed on this blog. Yeah, I know that means you all just clicked through to see it. While a bit disturbing, the picture definitely made me stop and ask the question, “What does 5G mean for healthcare?”

I’m not sure how many people have been following 5G, but it’s getting really close to becoming a reality. For those not familiar with the technology, here’s an anecdote that highlights how fast 5G can be “In testing, the transfer speeds for the “5G” network sent data at 1.056 Gbit/s to a distance of up to 2 kilometers.”

1 Gig per second. What would it mean that you could transfer 1 Gig per second wirelessly? Now, I should note that it’s going to take some time for the devices to be able to support these kinds of speeds. Plus, it will also take the applications time to figure out what to do with this type of speed. However, it changes how we think about what we’re streaming completely.

In healthcare, those radiology images that are so big would be nothing to share with anyone anywhere anytime. You could literally have multiple HD cameras filming your healthcare experience live in real time with no issues at that speed. Genomic data is huge, but it could easily be shared with these types of speeds to anyone that needs it anywhere.

This is just the obvious stuff. What’s so incredible about reaching new types of breakthrough speeds like this is that it enables us to discover new opportunities that we couldn’t even think of previously because the speeds made that type of thinking impossible. When you look at the volume of data that sensors will be streaming about our lives, you can see why these speeds could be extremely valuable. Plus, at these speeds, federated data becomes much easier to stomach because you know even large data sources are available with ease.

What do you think of 5G data? How do you think it will impact healthcare? It’s amazing how broadband changed so many things we do online and enabled so many new services. 5G could and likely will do the same.

The Speed of Innovation in Mobile Networks – Enabling The Future of Healthcare

Posted on September 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been attending the CTIA Super Mobility Conference in Las Vegas today and it’s been eye opening to say the least. The efforts they’re making to make wireless networks work for the IOT (internet of things) and even things like drones is incredible. Much of the buzz at the event has also been around the coming 5G networks.

Matt Grop EVP and CTO at Qualcomm offered this comparison of the progression from voice to 4G LTE to 5G:

Later, Rajeev Suir, President and CEO of Nokia, then suggested that we need 5G networks because the applications of the future will require it. This is an interesting statement to consider. Today during my Healthcare API discussion the need for faster connections came up and illustrated how healthcare could benefit from this additional speed. In fact, the innovations in healthcare are likely going to be facilitated or even demand the faster speeds to become a reality.

Think about neural networks and genomic medicine. That type of processing isn’t going to happen on the phone. The data for those won’t be stored on your phone, laptop, or desktop. It’s going to be stored and processed in the cloud and then sent back to your phone. The exchange of data that is going to need to happen is going to be huge and we’re going to need really fast networks to enable this future.

Think about all of the sensor data that is going to be reporting up to the cloud to be processed by these neural networks and pharmacogenomic processing engines. We’re not going to plug in to transfer this data. It’s going to use these ubiquitous wireless networks that currently connect our smart phones.

This all certainly leads to a fascinating future. I love the way technology can open the door to opportunities that would have never been thought possible previously. New high speed mobile networks like 5G are an example of that. The only question is if even 5G will be fast enough.