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From Makerspaces to Virtual Spaces: How 3D Changes Everything… – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 30, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 2/2 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Chuck Webster, MD (@wareFLO) on the topic of “From Makerspaces to Virtual Spaces: How 3D Changes Everything…”

What do makerspaces, 3D-printing, and virtual & augmented reality have in common? Three-dimensional objects! Makerspaces, and their 3D printers, make 3D objects in the real world. Virtual & augmented reality are populated by virtual models of objects from physical real world.

At the recent RSNA meeting in Chicago, the same 3D models, of wounds, tumors, and proposed implants, could be viewed in either virtual or physical reality (via 3D printing). 3D printed models can be designed in virtual reality. Physical objects can be scanned and viewed in virtual reality.

What are the implications of this 3D printing / virtual reality connection? Well, for one thing, you’ll find a lot of virtual reality meetups in makerspaces (as occurs here in Columbus, at The Idea Foundary). Microsoft co-locates a “Mixed Reality” (VR + AR) space in its corporate makerspace.

But here is where I want to drive this. Makerspaces are inherently social, based on communities of peer-to-peer teaching and learning. However virtual reality has a loner stereotype, someone covering their eyes with electronics, and withdrawing from social interaction to explore, alone, fantastical, artificial landscapes.

The exception, in a big, big way, is social virtual reality. I wrote about this recently in my blog post Shared Social Virtual Reality Networking for Health, Healthcare, and Health IT Marketing. I won’t belabor the point here, except to say I am as excited about social virtual reality as a I was, and still am, about Twitter. In some ways, I’m reminded of the Blab and Firetalk group social video platforms (RIP!). A bunch of people, from anywhere in the world, can get together, virtually, to, well, do almost anything. Party in space. Watch movies underwater. Customize their avatars however they wish (yes, it can get freaky!)

If above seems like a bit of mishmash, I admit it does seem that way to me too. However, I didn’t want to call this HITsm tweet chat something like “Stuff @wareFLO Thinks Is Cool at The Moment.” So I thought hard, and came up with some connections!

PS. I’m bring my makerspace and virtual reality gear to HIMSS18! Look me up and check out this video preview!

Now for the topics we’ll be discussing during this week’s #HITsm chat. I hope you’ll join in on the discussion.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Did you ever make something (perhaps out of readily available household items!) that solved YOUR unique problem. How did you feel? Is there something there, about everyday people making stuff, that healthcare needs? #HITsm

T2: Have you tried out a virtual reality headset yet? Which one? What did you see? What was exciting? What was disappointing? How about augmented reality? (Lots of AR apps now on iOS) Same questions… #HITsm

T3: I’m basically an engineer who happened to go to med school. It’s how I got interested in workflow. But now I’m getting back into “mechatronics” (building robots, for example) I’m happy to share my expertise. Anyone wanna build something together? What? #HITsm

T4: What if all of us, in this Twitter chat, right now, by just pushing a button, could appear to each other, in real time, as holograms (think Star Trek or Star Wars) anywhere in the real or imaginary world, what place & setting would you chose? #HITsm

T5: What questions would you like to get answered about 3D printing and virtual/augmented reality? #HITsm

Bonus: How might 3D printing and virtual (or augmented) reality be used for health IT marketing & PR purposes? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
2/9 – The Role of HealthIT in Driving Payer Provider Employer Collaboration
Hosted by Heather Lavoie (@HSLavoie) from @Geneia

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – #HIMSS18
Hosted by #HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors

3/2 – Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare
Hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on January 4, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The first part of this article set a general context for health IT in 2017 and started through the year with a review of interesting articles and studies. We’ll finish the review here.

A thoughtful article suggests a positive approach toward health care quality. The author stresses the value of organic change, although using data for accountability has value too.

An article extolling digital payments actually said more about the out-of-control complexity of the US reimbursement system. It may or not be coincidental that her article appeared one day after the CommonWell Health Alliance announced an API whose main purpose seems to be to facilitate payment and other data exchanges related to law and regulation.

A survey by KLAS asked health care providers what they want in connected apps. Most apps currently just display data from a health record.

A controlled study revived the concept of Health Information Exchanges as stand-alone institutions, examining the effects of emergency departments using one HIE in New York State.

In contrast to many leaders in the new Administration, Dr. Donald Rucker received positive comments upon acceding to the position of National Coordinator. More alarm was raised about the appointment of Scott Gottlieb as head of the FDA, but a later assessment gave him high marks for his first few months.

Before Dr. Gottlieb got there, the FDA was already loosening up. The 21st Century Cures Act instructed it to keep its hands off many health-related digital technologies. After kneecapping consumer access to genetic testing and then allowing it back into the ring in 2015, the FDA advanced consumer genetics another step this year with approval for 23andMe tests about risks for seven diseases. A close look at another DNA site’s privacy policy, meanwhile, warns that their use of data exploits loopholes in the laws and could end up hurting consumers. Another critique of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act has been written by Dr. Deborah Peel of Patient Privacy Rights.

Little noticed was a bill authorizing the FDA to be more flexible in its regulation of digital apps. Shortly after, the FDA announced its principles for approving digital apps, stressing good software development practices over clinical trials.

No improvement has been seen in the regard clinicians have for electronic records. Subjective reports condemned the notorious number of clicks required. A study showed they spend as much time on computer work as they do seeing patients. Another study found the ratio to be even worse. Shoving the job onto scribes may introduce inaccuracies.

The time spent might actually pay off if the resulting data could generate new treatments, increase personalized care, and lower costs. But the analytics that are critical to these advances have stumbled in health care institutions, in large part because of the perennial barrier of interoperability. But analytics are showing scattered successes, being used to:

Deloitte published a guide to implementing health care analytics. And finally, a clarion signal that analytics in health care has arrived: WIRED covers it.

A government cybersecurity report warns that health technology will likely soon contribute to the stream of breaches in health care.

Dr. Joseph Kvedar identified fruitful areas for applying digital technology to clinical research.

The Government Accountability Office, terror of many US bureaucracies, cam out with a report criticizing the sloppiness of quality measures at the VA.

A report by leaders of the SMART platform listed barriers to interoperability and the use of analytics to change health care.

To improve the lower outcomes seen by marginalized communities, the NIH is recruiting people from those populations to trust the government with their health data. A policy analyst calls on digital health companies to diversify their staff as well. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is also getting into the act.

Specific technologies

Digital apps are part of most modern health efforts, of course. A few articles focused on the apps themselves. One study found that digital apps can improve depression. Another found that an app can improve ADHD.

Lots of intriguing devices are being developed:

Remote monitoring and telehealth have also been in the news.

Natural language processing and voice interfaces are becoming a critical part of spreading health care:

Facial recognition is another potentially useful technology. It can replace passwords or devices to enable quick access to medical records.

Virtual reality and augmented reality seem to have some limited applications to health care. They are useful foremost in education, but also for pain management, physical therapy, and relaxation.

A number of articles hold out the tantalizing promise that interoperability headaches can be cured through blockchain, the newest hot application of cryptography. But one analysis warned that blockchain will be difficult and expensive to adopt.

3D printing can be used to produce models for training purposes as well as surgical tools and implants customized to the patient.

A number of other interesting companies in digital health can be found in a Fortune article.

We’ll end the year with a news item similar to one that began the article: serious good news about the ability of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) to save money. I would also like to mention three major articles of my own:

I hope this review of the year’s articles and studies in health IT has helped you recall key advances or challenges, and perhaps flagged some valuable topics for you to follow. 2018 will continue to be a year of adjustment to new reimbursement realities touched off by the tax bill, so health IT may once again languish somewhat.

Healthcare Is Going to Benefit from the Confluence of Consumer Technologies

Posted on December 28, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Next week is the annual CES conference in Las Vegas. It’s a unique event that brings together 170,000 people across 4 of the largest conference venues in the world. It’s enormous and a little hard to process.

Having attended for the last ~11 years, it’s been amazing to see the pace of progress with so many technologies. Remember that it’s only been about 9 years since the iPhone was launched. While smartphones and tablets have gotten so much better over this time period a whole slew of other consumer technologies have as well.

Looking forward to CES, it’s amazing to see the development of things like: 3D Printing, Virtual Reality, Augmented reality, IoT (Internet of Things…or as I like to call it Smart Everything), voice recognition, AI, robotics, sensors, etc etc etc. It’s an exciting time to be in an industry where so many things are developing so quickly.

Maybe I’m skewed because I’m a blogger in healthcare, but it’s really amazing how healthcare sits at the confluence of so many of these technologies. The overlap that’s going to happen between augmented reality, 3D printing, AI, sensors and new things we barely understand is going to be extraordinary.

I recently saw a 3D printing conference for healthcare. While 3D printing is very exciting for healthcare, it wouldn’t be nearly as exciting if we didn’t have all of the other innovations in cameras, storage, data sharing, virtual reality, etc. We needed evolutions and innovations in all of these spaces for the other technologies to really work well.

I’ve often said that the most interesting things in healthcare happen at the intersections. I think that’s particularly true in the digital health space. As I head to CES, I’ll be watching for this type of crossover of technologies. I think this year we’re going to see a lot of companies utilizing multiple technologies in ways we’d never seen previously.

3D Printed Stethoscopes for Just 30 Cents

Posted on August 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’ve written about 3D printing a number of times before including the 3D printed hand, 3D printed hearts, and even 3D printed blood systems to name a few. Plus, we’re just getting started with the 3D printing revolution.

Another example of the amazing work of 3D printing in healthcare is this story about a doctor in Gaza that’s developed a 3D printed Stethoscope. Here’s a quote from the article which highlight the healthcare challenges he faces:

“I had to hold my ear to the chests of victims because there were no good stethoscopes, and that was a tragedy, a travesty, and unacceptable,” Loubani told the Chaos Communications Camp in Zehdenick, Germany. “We made a list of these things that if I could bring them into Gaza, into the third world in which I work and live, then I felt like I could change the lives of my patients.”

In order to solve this problem Loubani turned to the Glia Free Medical hardware project in order to develop the 3D printed stethoscope. They estimate that it cost them about $10,000 to develop. Here’s the quote about the 3D printed stethoscope that’s astounding:

“This stethoscope is as good as any stethoscope out there in the world and we have the data to prove it,” Loubani says.

I’m sure the FDA won’t let them say that, but when your alternative is putting your ear to the chest of the patient, it’s hard to argue with a 30 cent tool that will be an improvement over no stethoscope.

It’s also exciting that the Glia team is also working to develop pulse oximetry equipment, a gauze loom, otoscope, and other surgical tools. Plus, as you can probably imagine from the name, anything that the Glia Free Medical hardware project develops will be released as open source to the community.

It’s worth noting that prominent people like Dr. Eric Topol have been saying that he no longer carries a stethoscope since he can just do an ultrasound and see the heart or an EKG with his cell phone. This reminds me of the hashtag #FirstWorldProblems The hashtag doesn’t quite work for this, but it reminds us of the difference between what’s available in a first world country versus the developing world. It’s amazing what we take for granted. A doctor having a stethoscope nearby has been a standard forever in the US. Hopefully now it will become a standard in Gaza thanks to the new 30 cent innovation.

The Future Of…Healthcare Innovation

Posted on March 17, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is part of the #HIMSS15 Blog Carnival which explores “The Future of…” across 5 different healthcare IT topics.

Innovation is a fascinating concept. Historians and philosophers have been thinking and investigating the key to innovation forever. I’m not sure anyone has ever found the true secret sauce to innovation. Every innovation I’ve ever seen has been a mix of timing, luck, and hard work.

Some times the timing is not right for a product and therefore it fails. The product might have been great, but the timing wasn’t right for it to be rolled out. Innovation always requires a little luck. Maybe it was the chance meeting with an investor that helps take and idea to the next level. Maybe it’s the luck of getting the right exposure that catapults your idea into a business. Maybe it’s the luck of the right initial end users which shape the direction of the product. Every innovation has also required hard work. In fact, the key to ensuring you’re ready for luck to be heaped upon you or to test if your timing is right is to put in the work.

The great thing is that it’s a brilliant time to be working on innovations in healthcare. We’re currently at the beginning of a confluence of healthcare innovations. Each one on its own might seem like a rather small innovation, but taken together they’re going to provide amazing healthcare innovations that shape the future of healthcare as we know it.

Let me give a few examples of the wave of innovations that are happening. Health sensors are exploding. Are ability to know in real time how well our body is performing is off the charts. There are sensors out there for just about every measurable aspect of the human body. The next innovation will be to take all this sensor data and collapse it down into appropriate communication and actions.

Another example, is the innovations in genomic medicine. The cost and speed required to map your genome is collapsing faster than Moore’s law. All of that genomic data is going to be available to innovators who want to build something on top of it.

3D printing is progressing at light speed. Don’t think this applies to healthcare? Check out this 3D printed prosthetic hand or this 3D printed heart. If you really want your mind blown, check out people’s work to provide blood to 3D printed organs.

If you think we’ve gotten value out of healthcare data, you’re kidding yourself. There are so many innovations in healthcare data that are sitting there waiting in healthcare data hoards. We just need to tap into that data and start sharing those findings with a connected healthcare system.

The mobile device is an incredible innovation just waiting for healthcare. We are all essentially walking around with a computer in our pocket now. We’ve already started to see the innovations this will provide healthcare, but it’s only just the beginning. This computer in our pocket will become the brain and communication hub for our healthcare needs.

I’m sure you can think of other innovations that I haven’t mentioned including robotics, health literacy, healthcare gaming, etc. What’s most exciting to me about the future of healthcare innovation is that each of these innovations will combine into a unforeseen innovation. The most powerful innovations in healthcare will not be a single innovative idea. Instead, it will come from someone who combines multiple innovations into one beautiful package.

The most exciting part of innovation is that it’s usually unexpected and surprising. I love surprises. What do you see as the future building blocks of innovation in healthcare?

Hand of a Superhero – 3D Printing and Wearables

Posted on February 25, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.


This story has been going around all over social media, but it’s too good not to share. If you read the New York Times story and don’t get close to tears, I’ll be surprised. Prosthesis for children are such a great application of 3D printing. Plus, it’s great to see so many of the 3D printing designs out in the public domain and available to anyone for free.

Here’s a video look at how the prosthesis works:

Also, here’s a video where they literally build the 3D printed prosthesis.

The most amazing part of this prosthesis to me is the cable “tendons” that are attached to the wrist muscle to flex the hand. Seeing solutions like this help remind me that sometimes we’re trying to hard to find the perfect solution. Instead of trying to be the end all be all solution that restores everything to perfection, sometimes we need to approach the problem with a simple but effective solution.

The mix of new technologies applied in unique ways never cease to amaze me.

Massive Tech Shifts and Their Impact on Healthcare

Posted on January 20, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post brought to you by HP Matter. The content and opinions expressed below are that of Smart Phone Health Care.

We’re in the middle of one of the biggest shifts in technology that have ever occurred. While we’ve all heard the buzzwords big data, cloud, mobility, security, 3D Printing, wearables, and nanotechnology, those buzzwords each represent a major change that’s taking place in technology. Each of these technology shifts is going to have an enormous impact for good on all of society, but will literally transform healthcare as we know it today.

This transformation means that hospitals, researchers, doctors and patients each have a tremendous opportunity to benefit from these changes. The question isn’t whether these tech shifts will impact healthcare, but whether we’ll be part of that transformation.

While at International CES I saw the HP Matter booth and was able to check out the HP Matter magazine. If you’re interested in how these tech shifts are going to impact healthcare, you should check out the latest issue of HP Matter since it’s focused on healthcare. In this issue they look at 6 healthcare disruptions for 20203D printed prosthetics, and a great Q&A with Theresa Payton covering big data, security and regulation in healthcare. The 6 disruptions for 2020 are particularly interesting for me. Although, my guess is that many of those disruptions are already starting to happen now. By 2020 they’ll have become part of the normal fabric of healthcare.

HP Matter also put out a great video that talks about the future of technology and healthcare. Watching it gets me really excited about where healthcare can go:

I look forward to reading more of HP Matter as they cover the tech disruption happening in other industries. Looking at other industries is one of the best ways to re-frame what we see happening in healthcare. Also, it doesn’t hurt that if you Register for HP Matter, you have a chance to win an HP SlateBook x2 (an Ultrabook and tablet in one).  Weekly drawings will be conducted throughout January and February.

While we’ve been working for a long time to integrate technology with healthcare, in many ways we’re still just at the very beginning of what’s going to be possible. What current technological advancement in healthcare interest you?

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3D Printed Heart Saves Child’s Life

Posted on October 8, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

No, they didn’t print a 3D printed heart that they could put inside a patient (maybe that will come one day), but this is still a great story. They 3D printed a model of a heart to help the surgeons prepare for heart surgery. Here’s an excerpt from The Independent article:

Surgeons at a New York hospital have credited 3D printing with helping to save the life of a 2-week-old baby who required complicated heart surgery.

Using MRI scan data, Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital in New York City 3D printed a copy of the child’s heart, which was both riddled with holes and structured unusually.

Surgery was going to be complicated and dangerous, but this 3D printed heart provided the surgeons the opportunity to study the organ, and develop a detailed surgery strategy.

“The baby’s heart had holes, which are not uncommon with CHD, but the heart chambers were also in an unusual formation, rather like a maze,” Dr Emile Bacha, who performed the surgery, told Connecticut local media.

Really cool stuff. The article also noted that normally this type of surgery would have required multiple operations to complete. With the 3D printed heart, they were able to repair the baby’s heart with one operation.

I’d never thought about using 3D printed objects for teaching, learning and preparing for surgeries. It makes a lot of sense and is a really great innovation. I love when technology comes together and benefits us in ways we likely wouldn’t have expected.

Providing Blood to 3D Printed Organs

Posted on July 9, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m sure we’ve all been intrigued by the progress that’s being made on 3D printing organs. If you’re like me, the idea blows you away when you see mention of it on Twitter or you see the concepts on a show like Grey’s Anatomy. The fact that we can 3D print an organ at all is astonishing and provides some really interesting opportunities for research. However, we’re quite a ways from actually being able to 3D print an organ that we can transplant into a human body.

Transplanting a 3D printed organ into a human body is indeed the holy grail of 3D printing organs. There are so many people who die every year as they wait on the organ transplant list (Side Note: Sign up to be a donor). If we could 3D print them an organ, we could possibly save thousands of people’s lives.

While TV shows and mentions on Twitter make it sound pretty easy, a deeper dive into the 3D printing of organs shows how complex the process really is to create a human organ that actually functions. This was incredibly illustrated by this article on 3DPrint.com that talks about the need to not only 3D print the organ, but also to create the vascular network that’s needed to furnish the organ with an ongoing blood supply. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

With that said, there is still one major hurdle to get us from the tiny sheets of 3D printed organ tissue, to that of entire 3D printed organs, which could one day be created by a patient’s own stem cells, and transplanted to save their life. That hurdle is the vascularisation of those organs. Every cell within a human organ, such as the liver, kidney or heart are within a hair’s width of a blood supply. This is an incredibly complex setup, one which up until now, researchers have found to be a nightmare to overcome when dealing with bioprinting. Without an adequate vascular network, the cells would be starved of oxygen, as well as a means to excrete waste, causing them to die and making the printed organs worthless.

The rest of the story is always more complex than the headlines. The great part is that in that same article the talk about some work by scientists from the Universities of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford and MIT working together to 3D print a network of stable capillaries. Even the description of the process is complex, but basically they’ve figured out a way to create tiny spaces where blood could flow.

Stories like this are extremely exciting, but also show just how far we have to go before we’ll be able to 3D print an organ. Really amazing work.

2013 Health IT Predictions – 3-D Printing in Healthcare

Posted on January 6, 2013 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I never can resist clicking on a tweet that looks at the future landscape of healthcare IT. I love to see what other people are saying about it. Although, as is the case above, I usually find that people are pretty cautious in their predictions. The challenge is that a year is probably not a big enough time frame to really make bold predictions.

For example, the above article suggests the following as major healthcare IT trends: patient portals, mobile devices, and telemedicine. They are absolutely right. Does anyone doubt that all of these things won’t be major happenings in 2013? We know they will because they’ve already started happening today. Next year will just be an extension of this year.

On the other hand, I was intrigued by this tweet about 3-D Printing in healthcare:

If you don’t know about 3-D printing, then check it out on Wikipedia. It is an absolutely incredible technology that’s going to absolutely revolutionize manufacturing products as we know it. That includes many of the products we use in healthcare. Is it going to happen next year? I don’t think so. Certainly much progress will be made in 2013, but 5 years from now 3D printing is going to be able to do insane things when it comes to creating your own products with a simple 3D printer.

I’d love to hear your thoughts. What drastic things do you think will happen in healthcare 5 years from now? Feel free to look even farther out if you prefer.