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Will Big Media Spoil HealthIT for the Little Guy? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/31 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by ShereeseM, MS/MBA (@ShereesePubHlth) on the topic of “Will Big Media Spoil HealthIT for the Little Guy?“.

We’ve all witnessed big tech’s recent push into healthcare. Atul Gawande is in a deal with Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway, and it looks like we might be seeing our EOBs being sent to us from Google fairly soon. Amazon’s hired 20,000 doctors. Ok, that was an Onion article, but illustrates the point.  And now comes big media into our little world. And in an industry that still resists change, healthcare technology is still small. But what would make media companies want to dabble in the healthcare IT space. Well, to understand the why, you must first understand the who.

The “who” is Comcast Corporation. Comcast, the big media company, best known for broadband solutions, is now making a play for healthcare technology. Comcast recently entered a joint venture with the Independence Healthcare Group, in which the two will build patient-centered digital platforms for Comcast’s 60 million plus customers. The collaboration looks to make the patient-provider communications seamless by allowing patients to view needed information and to-do lists prior to operations and other engagements. Time will tell if this is finally the project for Comcast, as their prior attempts to break into the market, initially partnering with Kaiser Permanente on a now defunct pregnancy app and later with a UC Davis partnership on health and nutrition videos, were both colossal failures.

The “who is also Cox Communications. Cox tried to make a statement in the healthcare IT space by partnering with Cleveland Clinic to develop Vivre Health, a home health product and service delivered by broadband. The venture failed and Cox eventually pulled out. But like Comcast, Cox believes they have now found their footing. They are banking on the value of remote patient monitoring and in 2015 they purchased Trapolla. The product is now in development.

Now that we know the who, let’s concentrate on the why. The easy answer is market share. The healthcare market is worth more than 3 trillion dollars, according to CMS estimates. It’s only intuitive that other industries would come calling. Media companies may see healthcare IT as an opportunity to capitalize on a growing industry while their own industry may be cooling off. Companies have to leverage their current capabilities to drive growth in others sectors. Media companies are in a unique position to do just this.

The interest in healthcare tech by big media may have a negative impact on smaller or independent brands. Based on broadband alone, smaller companies can’t compete on the scale of companies like Comcast and Cox Communications. Could the current interest in the market, which is growing, mark the end for smaller companies? Time will tell but what is certain is that nothing in healthcare comes quickly. Big media may find it hard disrupting in healthcare where the small guy may already have the lay of the land. And small or not, already vested players won’t sit idly by while big media giants come it and try to dim their flame.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat to discuss big media in healthcare. What will be the impact for good and/or bad? How will they fair? Is this a good choice for them?

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Does big media belong in healthIT? #HITsm

T2: Will big media make seismic gains and at what cost to smaller companies? #HITsm

T3: What sound contributions can media make to health IT? #HITsm

T4: How can smaller companies compete with big media in the health IT space? #HITsm

T5: Given; healthcare is like no other industry, due to regulations. Will the complexity of it discourage big media? #HITsm

Bonus: Big media and big tech, what problems in healthcare would you like to see them tackle? Price Transparency? Prescription drugs? The opioid crisis? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/7 – International Healthcare: Standards, Patients, and Personal Experiences
Hosted by Jessica Maxine Selby (@JessMSelby)

9/14 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #PatientsMatter
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – TBD
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Boss Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on August 24, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today we have two hilarious things. One is in the comic strip below and the other is in the tweet that shared this comic strip. No doubt one of the hardest thing in any job is getting the right people working for you. If you can do that as a boss, then you’re doing amazing things. If you’ve ever had a boss, then you’ll enjoy the Fun Friday humor below.


The Cultural Nuances of Communication

Posted on August 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s amazing some of the insights you can get from Twitter. This is especially true when someone puts together a series of tweets (most people call them a tweetstorm) that shares a story or insights on a specific topic. Today, I gained some new insight into the cultural nuances of communication in this Twitter thread:

Why we need more black men in medicine. I had a patient this week who came in with left leg weakness over the last week. Younger black guy in his 30s. Brain MRI clearly indicates multiple sclerosis. So we all go in during morning rounds to give my man his diagnosis.

He has a bit of blank stare as he listens to my attending try to explain what he has. He was told earlier he mightve had a stroke, and now we’re telling him he doesnt have a stroke. But he’s clearly processing what he does have and just says “nah” to having any questions.

So we’re running the patient list after rounding, and as we get to him my attending says somn like “idk if apathy is the word, seems like he doesnt care”. Laughs and so does the rest of the team. I’m sitting there like, this aint it. And yes, I was the only one.

So after running the list, I don’t even stick around with the team. I go straight back to dude’s room and the code switch was automatic. “Look mane, I know all that was a lot. Did you really get what the doc was sayin?” Mans looked at me with a face of relief.

Now I’m goin into detail on MS, how it’s different from a stroke, and what it means for him long term. The real validation came when he interrupted me early on and said “OH so it’s a BRAIN thing I got?” “Yes my man it’s a brain thing.”

And now my dude understands what he has, why we need the tests we need, and what the rest of his life might look like. All because I could recognize what everyone else seemed to miss, from a cultural perspective. He’s not apathetic. Folk just weren’t connecting with him.

I’m in the right field fam.

We definitely underestimate the nuances required to communicate effectively across cultures. It’s such an important nuance that’s often missed. As we start to automate more of our healthcare communication with chat bots and other AI empowered communication, I wonder if we’ll take some of these cultural nuances into account. That’s a really challenging problem, but something we should consider a lot more in our healthcare communication.

The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 21, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/24 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Colton Ortolf (@ColtonOrtolf) who blogs at tech prescribed on the topic of “The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management“.

Chronic disease is an incredibly broad term, but it can be simply defined as “a physical or mental health condition that lasts more than one year and causes functional restrictions or requires ongoing monitoring or treatment.” In all, 86% of $2 trillion in US healthcare expenditures each year are devoted to those with chronic illnesses.

If you aren’t sufficiently shaken by that statistic, here are a few more on the devastating impact of these diseases:

  • 60% of people have at least 1 chronic disease, while 12% have 5 or more
  • Chronic disease accounts for $0.96 of every Medicare dollar and $0.83 of every Medicaid dollar
  • Productivity losses from chronic illness will cost the US approximately $1T annually
  • Chronic diseases are responsible for 7 out of 10 deaths every year

Also, here are the top 10 chronic diseases by percentage of the US population they impact: Hypertension (58%), High Cholesterol (47%), Arthritis (31%), Coronary Artery Disease (29%), Diabetes (27%), Chronic Kidney Disease (18%), Heart Failure (14%), Depression (14%), Alzheimer’s / Dementia (11%), COPD (11%).

Now that we can all agree on the scale of this epidemic, we can begin to decipher how we should go about addressing it. Being a chronic disease sufferer is – at best – challenging and – at worst – completely debilitating. Drawers and cabinets are filled with complicated medications, doctor appointments cause missed work days, and daily pain can become unbearable. Along with the added mental and physical stress, we would assume that consumers would try to avoid these illnesses at all costs. However, much of the rise in chronic disease rates can be attributed to preventable patient behaviors: smoking, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity. Couple these behaviors with extended life expectancy, and a chronic disease is nearly guaranteed for your future.

Given the nature of these risk factors, it is clear that reducing costs and prevalence is reliant on our ability to predict and alter consumer behavior; and, many entities have undertaken efforts to do so in recent years. Population Health initiatives, often spearheaded by public institutions, seek to remove environmental risk factors and educate the public on how to make healthier choices. Providers and Health Plans launch coordinated behavior modification campaigns targeted at populations at risk of developing chronic illnesses. Care Management teams directed by trained specialists deploy a variety of tactics to help the sickest patients stay on track with their care plans. The people driving these efforts are nothing short of heroic, but we are also on the precipice of an opportunity to scale and optimize their efforts using cutting edge technology.

And that brings us to the focus of today’s chat. Scaled data management and analytics, proliferation of wearables and IoT sensors, and the dawn of artificial intelligence are among the many technologies that we expect to drastically improve the management of chronic diseases. We are already seeing impact through companies like Omada Health, which utilizes digital tracking technology and a wifi scale coupled with personalized coaching to combat diabetes. Google is even developing an AI that can recommend fitness and meal plans. Controlling the growth of these diseases is undoubtedly the biggest challenge and the most salient opportunity we have in the US healthcare system. As we progress towards a new age of fee for value, let’s explore the following questions to determine our greatest opportunities at the intersection of tech and chronic disease management.

Sources:

Here are the various topics and questions we’ll be discussing for this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: How can technology help drive healthier behaviors in patients? #HITsm

T2: Given increasing focus on mental health conditions, how can technology play a role in supporting behavioral health patients? #HITsm

T3: What tools should we develop for caregivers to help optimize their efforts in managing chronic diseases? #HITsm

T4: What needs to change in industry structure (payment models, policy, health system focus, etc.) to better enable our fight against chronic diseases? #HITsm

T5: Do you think providers, payers, tech companies, or others are best positioned to have the biggest impact on chronic disease costs? #HITsm

Bonus: What are some examples of companies that are having a measurable impact in this space? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/31 – Will Big Media Spoil HealthIT for the Little Guy?
Hosted by ShereeseM, MS/MBA (@ShereesePubHlth)

9/7 – TBD
Hosted by Jessica Maxine Selby (@JessMSelby)

9/14 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #PatientsMatter
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Your Healthcare Strategy – Fun Friday

Posted on August 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Friday and we’re heading into one of the final weekends of summer. Of course, if you’re like me, it already feels like summer is over. Well, at least it does because my kids are back in school. When I go outside, it’s still extremely hot, so that still feels like summer, but I digress.

As we head into the weekend, I thought this Dilbert cartoon captured what I sometimes see in healthcare:

Have you had a boss like this? Have you seen this in healthcare? Share your experiences and stories in the comments or on social media.

The Cost Savings Opportunities on the Business Side of Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/17 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Don Lee (@dflee30) and @CAQH on the topic of “The Cost Savings Opportunities on the Business Side of Healthcare“.

Progress on the Journey to Automate the Business of Healthcare

Next time you’re in the doctor’s office, take note of what the administrative staff is doing behind the reception desk.

For every patient, the staff needs to know if he or she has an active health insurance policy, if it will reimburse for the specific services the doctor provides and the deductibles or copays to determine the patient’s bill. After the patient leaves, the staff submits the claim and may continue to follow up to make sure it gets paid.

Complicating their job, not every patient has the same insurance plan, let alone the same insurance company. That makes it easy to imagine how the doctor’s office could become a chaotic logjam without some uniformity in how all these processes are accomplished from one health plan to another. But, all in all, this system works pretty well, doesn’t it?

This is because leaders on the business side of healthcare began collaborating more than 10 years ago to crack the code on interoperability. They hammered out rules of the road that, in combination with other efforts, have accelerated the use of automation and brought uniformity to routine processes — like figuring out if you owe a copay.

But the journey from slower and costlier manual processes – like phone, fax and mail – to interoperable, or automated, machine-to-machine processes is far from complete. We know this because our co-host, @CAQH, tracks the progress of this journey through the CAQH Index.

The most recent CAQH Index found that progress has not only slowed, but on some important measures the industry has actually lost ground and a savings opportunity of $11.1 billion remains. Since healthcare providers have historically been slower to implement and use automated processes than health plans, the vast majority of the savings is available to medical providers ($7.5 billion) and dentists ($2 billion).

The CAQH Index takes into account the cost of common business processes for each stakeholder and the number they conduct each year to determine the greatest savings opportunities for medical and dental health plans and providers. We’ll be talking about that in the #HITsm chat with co-host @dflee30, a Health IT expert who recently interviewed CAQH researchers about the report.

For a short time, there’s still time to participate in the 2018 CAQH Index study. Every data contribution helps to make the Index more complete. Email explorations@caqh.org for information on how your organization can help.

Download a complimentary copy of the 2017 CAQH Index or use the savings calculator to estimate your organization’s savings at www.caqhindex.org and check out Don’s recent podcast.

So, without further ado, here are the various topics and questions we’ll be discussing for this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: #Healthcare administrative costs have been projected to reach $315 billion by this year. What are some of the sources of these excessive admin costs? #hitsm

T2: Why is it important to track progress related to admin costs? #hitsm

T3: What are some barriers the #healthcare industry faces in reducing admin costs? #hitsm

T4: What can the #healthcare industry do to overcome these barriers and achieve significant cost savings? #hitsm

T5: How is the emerging #valuebased payment model impacting #healthcare administration and operations? #hitsm

Bonus: What are other growing #healthcare administration and operations trends and how might they impact healthcare admin costs? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/24 – The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management
Hosted by Colton Ortolf (@ColtonOrtolf)

8/31 – Will Big Media Spoil HealthIT for the Little Guy?
Hosted by ShereeseM, MS/MBA (@ShereesePubHlth)

9/7 – TBD
Hosted by Jessica Maxine Selby (@JessMSelby)

9/14 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #PatientsMatter
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Seema Verma Calls for the End of Fax in Healthcare – Here’s The Real Problem

Posted on August 10, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

In case you missed it, CMS Administrator, Seema Verma challenged the audience at the Interop Forum hosted by ONC to “make every doctor’s office fax free by 2020.” Many in healthcare celebrated this challenge with statements like the following:

“It is inconceivable that providers still rely on technology that should have faded away at least 10 years ago.”

Statements like this make it seem like doctors and other healthcare leaders are luddites that are holding on to their fax machine out of some principal. They make it sound like healthcare professionals love their fax machines. Let me assure you that neither thing is the case. The reason faxes are so prominent in healthcare is a complex issue. However, the core problem is that there’s no better solution.

Everyone calls for the end of faxes in healthcare. The problem with this is that when you slam faxes, you’re slamming the most interoperable piece of healthcare. That’s sad, but true.

Faxes aren’t the problem. The lack of better solutions is the problem. So, instead of slamming fax machines, we should better understand the qualities that make faxes the interoperability choice of healthcare.

Here’s a look at why fax is so common in healthcare:
Faxes are HIPAA Compliant – The reality is that case law and other HHS comments have declared Faxes to be HIPAA compliant. That’s not to say that faxes are secure. We could talk over whether it’s secure or not and even edge cases where it’s still not HIPAA compliant. However, what’s clear to everyone in healthcare is that you can fax PHI and there’s no HIPAA violation. At least that’s the perception and how people treat it in action. This is a powerful idea that can’t be understated. Perceptions deeply influence people’s behaviors. Especially in risk-averse doctors’ offices.

Published Fax Numbers – Every practice has a fax machine and they all publish their fax number on their website. Thanks to Google, there’s basically an online directory where I can search any doctor and find their fax number.

Faxes Are Standard – Unlike so many other healthcare interoperability standards, every fax machine knows how to call and talk with another fax machine. There’s no need to ask what version or flavor of the fax standard you are using. There’s no need to ask where you’re storing certain information. Every fax uses the same standard and delivers the same result regardless of organization.

Every Practice Has a Fax Workflow In most cases, practices have their fax machines integrated directly into their EHR. Regardless, they all have some workflow that gets from the fax machine to the provider. Don’t underestimate the power of this workflow.

Faxes are Free – Ok, this has evolved a little over the years as healthcare organizations have moved to secure fax and fax servers which might charge a monthly fee. However, faxes are relatively cheap and have a known cost structure behind them. In many cases, it’s a cost that’s already been incurred. There’s no incremental cost to send more faxes.

That’s a pretty compelling feature set and I’m sure I’ve missed something. If healthcare provided a solution that offered all of these things, healthcare organizations would happily take this replacement. Plus, a replacement could and should do things that faxes don’t do like granular data.

However, direct messaging taught us a really important lesson about granular data which also highlights why fax machines are still so popular and direct messaging is not. Machines love granular data. That’s why machines are ok with a massive CCDA document that’s chock full of data. However, those CCDA documents are almost impossible for a human to read and cause doctors to say that CCDA is an abomination that doesn’t improve care. They’re right if you’re talking about a human reading a CCDA.

Humans need healthcare documentation designed for humans! Leave the XML health data files to machines.

When you understand this idea, it’s easy to see why doctors still love to receive faxed notes and hate CCDAs. Faxed notes are generally human-readable documents (EHR note bloat aside). CCDAs are not. The ideal solution is that we could have both. We just haven’t gotten there yet, but we could get there if we could overcome many of the other compelling fax features listed above.

What About Patients?
There’s a common problem we have when discussing technology in healthcare. Healthcare is so complex that we often confuse various uses of the same technology. The fax machine is a great example. All of the above analysis was how healthcare providers use a fax machine to communicate with other healthcare providers and other healthcare organizations. All of these entities have a fax machine and know how to use it. This is why the fax is a compelling option in healthcare. However, when you add the patient to the mix, it changes the equation.

Many of the people who want to ax the fax are talking about it from the perspective of a patient. That’s a totally different equation than the one described above. Many patients don’t have fax machines anymore and they’re unlikely to ever get one. It’s not unreasonable to say that healthcare should abolish trying to fax healthcare information to patients. A fax is rarely the best workflow for a patient. Healthcare providers should consider patient-friendly options.

When talking about faxing, we need to separate the discussion of patient interoperability and provider interoperability. They are very different beasts and not separating them confuses the discussion.

Conclusion
All in all, Seema Verma can call for the end of fax until she’s blue in the face. Until there’s an alternative that’s better than the fax, we’re not going to see faxes out of healthcare. It’s no inconceivable or even ridiculous that healthcare organizations continue to use the best workflow they can find for their organization. In many cases today that workflow is the fax. Once that equation changes, every healthcare provider I know will change. I’ve never met a single provider that’s nostalgic for faxes. They hate them as much as the next person but don’t see a better option.

Of course, as Ed Gaines pointed out on Twitter, Seema may want to start by taking a good look in the mirror. How about CMS stops using fax as the only option for some of the things they do? Once CMS abolishes faxes from their organization, that will give her a more powerful platform to call on the rest of healthcare to do the same. Unfortunately, I think Seema will quickly realize that there’s a reason that faxes are still so popular, there’s nothing better.

If Seema does away with faxes in healthcare, she’ll be doing away with the only form of nationwide healthcare interoperability that we have today. What’s going to replace it?

What Does It Take to Be a Successful Healthcare Entrepreneur? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/10 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Michael Dermer (@michaelgdermer) and Victoria Sherman (@VictoriaShrman) on the topic of “What Does It Take to Be a Successful Healthcare Entrepreneur?“.

Michael Dermer is an entrepreneur, speaker, lawyer and founder/author of The Lonely Entrepreneur. Michael is considered the founder of not only a company, but an industry – rewarding individuals for healthy behavior. Michael left a promising law career to start IncentOne, the first company to provide rewards for healthy behavior. At the time, rewards in healthcare were not only non-existent – they were offensive. He was told over and over “we will never reward people for things they should be doing to be healthy.”

After bootstrapping for a decade, his company received a large private equity investment on October 15, 2008. They had arrived. It should have been a time for celebration. Then the financial crisis hit. Ten years were gone in ten days. Bankrupt customers. Investment gone. Credit dead. Family dollars at risk. Angry investors. Family relationships on the brink. It would take two years of working 24 hours a day to save what took ten years to build. The perfect storm.

It was doomed. Or was it? Today, health rewards are everywhere, he sold IncentOne to industry innovator Welltok and his company is credited with creating the health rewards industry. What resulted was not only a business success, but the discovery of unique intelligence on how to thrive under the pressure, chaos and burden of being the entrepreneur. The Lonely Entrepreneur was born. It is now their mission is to unlock the potential of entrepreneurs worldwide by turning the passion and pressure we all feel into success.

So, without further ado, here are the various topics and questions we’ll be discussing for this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: In today’s hypercompetitive world passion & grit aren’t enough, we must develop the skills and mindset to be a better entrepreneur each day. From managing the chaos to generating revenue to standing out from the crowd. What does it mean to be a successful entrepreneur? #HITsm

T2: Great products & services should be enough, you have to be adept at creating ‘leverage’ to make healthcare customers move quickly. Leverage is an important skill for winning business in healthcare. What are some of the ways to leverage winning in business? #HITsm

T3: You have to use your entrepreneurial creativity to find a niche, a ‘playground’ where you are the only one playing. How do you beat your competition by finding playgrounds where no one else is playing? #HITsm

T4: Health plans, health systems, pharma companies, employers are all very different animals. But chasing every customer means you’re bouncing all over without understanding your market. What are some of the unique value propositions for EACH of these healthcare entities? #HITsm

T5: The healthcare industry is full of well-entrenched, well-funded competitors. And buyers have little mindshare for the difference between products so you need to position your company in order to have success. Why is positioning more important than product and what are some ways to position your product/service? #HITsm

Bonus: If your company is struggling or not progressing as quickly as you would like, what are some of the things you can do to turn in around (i.e. pivot?) #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
8/17 – The Cost Savings Opportunities on the Business Side of Healthcare
Hosted by Don Lee (@dflee30) and @CAQH

8/24 – The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Management
Hosted by Colton Ortolf (@ColtonOrtolf)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

HIPAA Security Infographic

Posted on August 6, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are a lot of nuances to HIPAA. Hopefully, you’ve addressed them as part of your security risk analysis and any mitigation work that’s required as part of that analysis. Unfortunately, even an organization that does a solid HIPAA security risk analysis often doesn’t communicate what was done in that analysis to the rest of the organization.

With this in mind, I found this HIPAA security infographic by eFax to be valuable for those that aren’t deep in the nuances of HIPAA, but that want a quick overview of some common HIPAA issues that they should know about.

Healthcare Security Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on August 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

After Mike Semel’s recent post on embarrassment, career suicide, or jail, it may seem a bit ironic to offer some healthcare security humor. That’s exactly why we think it’s good to share some healthcare security humor. We love irony and we often have to remember that what we do is extremely serious, but we shouldn’t take ourselves too seriously. Plus, humor can often get a point across in a way that is extremely memorable. That’s how I felt when I saw the healthcare security cartoon below:

This cartoon reminds me of the hospital CIO who told me “I’m most concerned with the 21,000 security vulnerabilities that existed in my organization. I’m talking about the 21,000 employees.” This is a real problem and one that many people don’t take serious enough in healthcare. It’s not something you can just put as a line item on a budget. It takes shaping the culture of your organization and that’s hard, but essential.