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The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 9, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/12 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network (@HMNwriters) on the topic of “The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare”.

It’s time for #NursingNow. Nurses need to have a solid place at the table – from the C-Suite to Management, Entrepreneurs to Digital Health Innovators.  In collaboration with the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses, Nursing Now aims to raise the status and profile of nursing globally.  Nursing Now works to empower nurses to take their place at the heart of tackling 21st Century health challenges.

In this #HITMC chat, Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) and Janet Kennedy (@GetSocialHealth) will lead a discussion on Nurse Leadership and how every part of healthcare needs nurses to be present and actively involved.

Resources:

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Nurses have always been the backbone of healthcare. Do you think they have a large enough role in healthcare leadership? Why or why not? #HITsm

T2: Should the push to get more nurses in leadership come from nurses or other members of the healthcare team? Why do you think so? #HITsm

T3: Traditional concepts of a nurse’s role have changed over the past decade. What new career paths have you seen nurses take? #HITsm

T4: In a health system or practice setting, in what ways have nurses expanded their roles? #HITsm

T5: Nurses have been embracing entrepreneurship, both inside and outside of healthcare. What characteristics of nursing lend themselves to entrepreneurship? #HITsm

Bonus: Share your favorite nurse story. #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/19 – Government Regulations for Healthcare – Where Are We At and Where Are We Headed?
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy)

10/26 – TBD
Hosted by @bigdatadavid13

11/2 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/9 – TBD
Hosted by @technursejon

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/5 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth) on the topic of “Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring”.

One of the most effective medical interventions to significantly improve the health of patients doesn’t require the latest technology or expensive medication but simply involves helping them take their existing medication as prescribed.

It’s not a light topic, but we believe that people can benefit from more awareness about their actual risks, as opposed to sensationalized risks that make good stories for the popular media.

  • Between 41% and 59% of mentally ill patients take their medication infrequently or not at all.
  • Examples of common non-adherence behaviors include:
    • 1 in 2 people missed a dose
    • 1 in 3 forgot if they took the med
    • 1 in 4 did not get a refill on time

Medication non-adherence is an enormous problem that is still largely unaddressed by the healthcare system, but it’s not totally out of our control. Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we talk about medication compliance and drug monitoring.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: In what ways has medication non-compliance affected you or anyone you know? Professional or Personal. Can be acute or episodic… #HITsm

T2: Why didn’t the patient adhere? Was there a social determinant? An issue with side effects, access or money? Possible Rx abuse? #HITsm

T3: We know communication with healthcare professionals is key in patient’s adherence and that Medication Reconciliation is gaining traction with MIPS, etc., but are providers going into this level of detail (see example) to ensure patients truly understand why they need to take the meds they are prescribed? Why or why not? #HITsm

T4: Beyond condition management, what impact do you think medication non-compliance has on society as a whole? #HITsm

T5: What ideas & thoughts do you have around strategies for improving medication compliance? Have you come across any impactful strategies or workflows? #HITsm

Bonus: What technology do you think could help with these challenges? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/12 – The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

A Justin Bieber Opioid Ballad from ZDoggMD

Posted on September 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s a casual work Friday here at Healthcare Scene, so we like to take off from our regularly scheduled programming for something a little more casual. The latest parody video from ZDoggMD is about the Opioid Crisis and might be his best work yet. The messages he shares in the video are really spot on. I can imagine many of the legitimate chronic pain suffers might not like some of the ways it characterizes those who use opioids, but I thought ZDoggMD covers that in his comments about the impact the opioid crisis has had on chronic pain patients.

Check out the video below:

Have a great weekend and let’s all do what we can to help those around us impacted by opioids.

How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 25, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/28 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox.

In her opening remarks at the 2nd ONC Interoperability Forum, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma set the goal of eliminating the use of fax machines in healthcare by 2020. It’s true – fax is still the most common form of communication among providers for transmission of medical records, test results, instructions, and treatment regimens all thanks to its insusceptibility to hacking. While the rest of the world is embracing digitalization and the benefits it has brought us, healthcare seemed a bit reluctant about moving on. Fax or other paper-based records are largely inconvenient and created barriers to information exchange.

In the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning, we’re generating data in an unbelievable speed – more information to process, exchange and analyze, posing bigger challenges for snail-paced interoperability progress. Tech giants see this lack of interoperability as a perfect opportunity to enter healthcare and disrupt the “broken” industry. Apple Health is promoting open API for iOS users to own their health data; Amazon’s working with multiple healthcare organizations to build its own system; and the recent interoperability pledge by the six big companies is set to transform healthcare data infrastructure.

Coming from an outsider perspective, these companies are familiar with the user authorization approach. When you sign in to an app with your Google account, you’ll be asked to grant the app access to your information through an authentication protocol called OAuth 2.0. Ideally, this is the vision for healthcare data use in the future.

But the existing healthcare data infrastructure, in the meantime, is drastically different from the one these tech giants are familiar with. Perhaps a more realistic, pragmatic approach is to work with the established stakeholders in healthcare, particularly the big EHR vendors, instead of bringing in a whole new system to solve interoperability.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat to discuss interoperability’s impact on technology adoption in healthcare and share your opinions on what stakeholders need to do to improve interoperability and accelerate technology adoption.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are the biggest barriers to technology adoption in healthcare? #HITsm

T2: Is interoperability more challenging now with more data generated by technologies such as AI? #HITsm

T3: Will patient-authorized API access bring fundamental changes to interoperability? #HITsm

T4: How will tech giants’ move into healthcare impact interoperability? #HITsm

T5: What needs to be done by the established stakeholders in healthcare, e.g. EHR vendors, to solve interoperability? #HITsm

Bonus: What do you want as a patient when it comes to interoperability? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Going from Paper-Based Consents to eConsents in Healthcare

Posted on September 24, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For years we’d talk about the “paperless office” that would be created by the adoption of EHR software. Years later, that paperless office still doesn’t exist. One of the big reasons this hasn’t come to fruition is because EHRs can print massive reams of paper with the click of the button. Another reason the paperless office still alludes us is paper-based consents.

For years, there wasn’t a good way to replace paper-based consents with eConsents. However, that’s not the case today. To help us move towards the paperless office and to learn about adoption of eConsents in healthcare, I interviewed Robin McKee, MS, RN, Director of Clinical Informatics Solutions at FormFast. In this interview, Robin offers a lot of great insights into consents in healthcare and the value of healthcare organizations moving towards eConsents.

What are the main reasons people are still doing paper-based consents?

I see two big reasons for this. First, it’s a case of “it’s what we’ve always done.” When EHRs were first implemented, mobile was not a part of the strategy. This meant that getting a consent in front of a patient still meant paper and a clipboard. Today, the informed consent workflow is difficult if you don’t have a mobile solution.

Another reason is the sheer magnitude of the project. Over the years, each department, even each surgeon, may have their own version of a paper form, adding up to hundreds of variations of paper consent forms stuck in drawers of offices and nurse’s stations. It is a daunting task to try and tackle the conversion, standardization, and consolidation of the plethora of paper consents without a concrete path forward.

FormFast addressed both of those issues with our mobile eConsent solution.  We digitize all of the organization’s consent forms and make them available in an online eForms library.  The forms are delivered at the point-of-care on a mobile tablet for the patient to review and sign.  Once completed, they’re automatically archived in the EHR.  It’s a much more streamlined process.

Are electronic consent forms as legally binding and effective as paper-based consents?

Yes. When you take the stylus and sign your name and submit it, an eConsent electronically dates and time stamps your signature. It also locks the content on the form to prevent it from being modified post signature.

Are there ways that electronic consents are more effective than paper-based consents?

Definitely. In addition to the benefits I mentioned in the previous question, there are several more to add.

From a maintenance standpoint, you have one form to modify and it is instantly available to all staff. Templates can be created to ensure standardized statements on all consents and provide the means to add procedure specific content. Clinicians cannot submit consent forms that have required fields left incomplete. This helps guide the process and ensure consents are completed.

Our eConsent forms also allow for links to your organization’s educational content, right on the form, so it’s easy to link out to approved content for further education while having the informed consent discussion.

What are the biggest misconceptions around electronic consents?

What I have seen most often with our customers has been the idea that the consent is not modifiable, that it is a fixed document. We provide dynamic content based on procedure selection, or editable fields, as well as areas to add content via free text or speech recognition.

Our customers appreciate having a combination of standardized, dynamic, and free text content. Every patient is unique; providers must be able to account for the specific risks, benefits, and alternatives of any procedure for each patient.

What are the costs and savings associated with implementing eConsent?

We see both direct and indirect impact on B organization’s financial landscape. The direct impact is, of course, the savings from eliminating paper. We’ve seen estimates from $3 – 6 per page due to the following factors:

  • Supplies – paper, ink, etc.
  • Materials – copiers, scanners, faxes as well as maintenance on the hardware
  • Staff – to perform printing scanning and indexing functions
  • Storage of paper records
  • Secure shredding of scanned documents

More indirect costs include the loss of productivity of procedures or operating rooms, due to the delays caused by missing or incomplete paper consent forms. A JAMA Surgery article estimated over $500K per year is lost simply on this factor. Also, while less common, malpractice claims that site a lack of informed consent comprise 2/3 of total claims, opening organizations to costly legal proceedings.

One also needs to consider the value of better forms, workflow and communication via eConsent which improves both patient and clinician satisfaction.

Many of the consents are needed in the EHR.  What’s the process for integrating eConsent into the EHR?

Electronic consent forms are superior to paper in this regard. While paper consents get lost or have to be carried around in a paper chart until they are scanned into the EHR, eConsent forms are instantly archived into the EHR. This ensures the document is archived correctly every time.  Plus it is easy to access the form in pre-op, as well as confirm in the OR during timeout. We utilize a variety of methods, including HL7 and FHIR, to integrate with any EHR or document management system.

Are eConsent forms secure and trusted?  Could a digital signature be inappropriately replicated?

There are a couple of ways we prevent signatures from being inappropriately or inaccurately added.

When a clinician chooses to digitally sign a consent form, the login user’s name is applied. Additionally, our solution provides audit logs to track who has been in the system.

We also require that the patient sign each signature field.  This helps ensure that their informed consent is accurately documented.

What are you looking at next when it comes to eConsent?

FormFast recently introduced a great feature that launches and pre-populates the right consent form for the patient by scanning the patient’s wristband.  It’s another way that we’ve tried to make the consent process more streamlined.

We continue to refine our eConsent solution based on customer feedback. No one knows better than the end users what a successful solution should look like, what it should contain, and what makes for an optimal workflow.

We look toward updates, such as enhanced notification processes, more OS compatibility, and further improving the user interface, that will continue to improve clinician and patient satisfaction.

About FormFast
With over 25 years exclusively focused on healthcare needs and 1100+ hospital clients, FormFast is recognized as the industry leader in electronic forms, eSignature, and document workflow technology. FormFast’s enterprise software platform integrates with EHRs and other core systems to automate required documents, capturing data and accelerating workflows associated with them. By using FormFast, healthcare organizations achieve new levels of standardization and operational efficiency, allowing them to focus on their core mission – delivering quality care. Learn more at formfast.com.

FormFast is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 18, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop on the topic of “Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients“.

I, Jen Horonjeff, have a confession – I’m one of the dreaded “non-compliant” patients you hear about. I have been living with juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases for 33 years, so I often have a complex treatment plan. One of my biggest offenses is I don’t get my blood work done every four weeks, which is the regularity for which my doctor has ordered my labs.

I don’t have a fear of needles, it’s also relatively quick to drop into the lab and do, so why don’t I do it?

Because every time I do, the system fails me. The lab inevitably sends me a bill for an exorbitant amount of money claiming my insurance won’t cover it. That’s incorrect, they will, it’s just been billed incorrectly. Yet it’s up to me as a patient to sit on the phone for hours with the lab, the insurance company, my doctor’s office, and probably a friend to vent about it…again.

Healthcare, its systems, products and services, are supposed to improve the lives of patients and families, not create more headaches. But the problem is, until recently, no one really ever asked the patients what they were going through, what mattered to them, or their input how to fix it. Patients have been the recipients of the systems we develop, rather than the co-creators.

This is where human-centered design comes in. Human-centered design is about taking the time to #askpatients and design solutions to fit them, rather than continually have them navigate systems and tools that, at times, feel like a cruel joke. I’m not a bad patient because I don’t get my labs done. I am just exhausted by a system that did not incorporate proper human-centered design.

We all have a role to play to improve this. After a lifetime of stumbling through the healthcare system, I decided to do something about it and started Savvy Cooperative. Savvy is a patient-owned co-op that provides a marketplace for patient insights. Our goal is to make it so easy to connect and work with patients and healthcare consumers there is no excuse not to. I believe the future of healthcare is co-designed with patients.

As you go about your work or interface with the healthcare system, I hope you’ll be on the lookout for all the hoops patients jump through and think, “did anyone #askpatients about this?”

If you need examples where lack of human-centered design affects patients, check out some of our #MessedUpPtExp videos, featuring our friendly Savvy Puppets. Then, join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we’ll discuss it in further detail.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
Ice Breaker: We’ve got a Spotify playlist going of song titles that describe the current state of healthcare – what would you add to our #HealthcareSoundtrack? #HITsm

T1: Everyone has one, what’s one of the messed up patient experiences you’ve personally gone through or heard someone else go through that showed lack of human-centered design? #HITsm

T2: How can technology help to ease these headaches and improve the patient experience, rather than make it worse (feel free to use responses from T1 for inspiration!)? #HITsm

T3: Do you think patients can bring unique and valuable perspectives to the table that can make these technologies even better, and how so? #HITsm

T4: Let’s lay it out there, what are the reasons you have heard for why people or companies don’t work more directly with patients? #HITsm

T5: Some of the big consumer brands have mastered the user experience, but what do they need to do to truly improve the patient experience? #HITsm

Bonus: Who are some of the companies or individuals you feel are winning at human-centered design in healthcare, and what are they doing to show that? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Applying AI Based Outlier Detection to Healthcare – Interview with Dr. Gidi Stein from MedAware

Posted on September 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most people who receive healthcare understand that healthcare is as much art as it is science. We don’t expect our doctors to be perfect or know everything because the human body is just too complex and there are so many factors that influence health. What’s hard for patients to understand is when obvious human errors occur. This is especially true when technology or multiple layers of humans should have caught the obvious.

This is exactly why I was excited to interview Dr. Gidi Stein, CEO and Co-founder of MedAware. As stated on their website, their goal is to eliminate prescription errors. In the interview below, you’ll learn more about what MedAware and Dr. Stein are doing to achieve this goal.

Tell us a little about yourself and MedAware.

Early in my career, I worked in the Israeli high-tech industry and served as CTO and Chief Architect of several algorithm-rich startups. However, after many years working in technology, I decided to return to school and study medicine. In 2002, I graduated from Tel Aviv University Medical School with a specialization in internal medicine, treating patients and teaching students and residents in one of Israel’s largest hospitals.

After working as a physician for several years, I heard a heartbreaking story, which ultimately served as my motivation and inspiration to found MedAware. A physician was treating a 9-year-old boy who suffered from Asthma. To treat the symptoms, the physician entered the electronic prescribing environment and selected Singulair from the drop-down menu, a standard treatment for asthma. However, unfortunately, he accidentally clicked Sintrom, an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Tragically, neither the physician, pharmacist nor parent caught this error, which resulted in the boys’ untimely death. This avoidable, medication-related complication and death was caused by a typo.

Having worked as a physician for many years, I had a difficult time understanding that with all the medical intervention and technological support we rely on, our healthcare system was not intelligent enough to prevent errors like this. This was a symptom of a greater challenge; how can we identify and prevent medication related complications before they occur? Given my combined background in technology and medicine, I knew that there must be a solution to eliminate these types of needless errors. I founded MedAware to transform patient safety and save lives.

Describe the problem with prescription-based medication errors that exists today.  What’s the cause of most of these errors?

Every year in the U.S. alone, there are 1.5 million preventable medication errors, which result in patient injury or death. In fact, medication errors are the third leading cause of death in the US, and errors related to incorrect prescription are a major part of these. Today’s prescription-related complications fall into two main categories: medication errors that occur at the point of order entry (like the example of the 9yr old boy) and errors that result from evolving adverse drug events (ADEs). Point of order entry errors are a consequence of medication reconciliation challenges, typos, incorrect dosage input and other clinical inconsistencies.

Evolving ADEs are, in fact, the bulk of the errors that occur – almost 2/3 of errors are those that happen after a medication was correctly prescribed. These are often the most catastrophic errors, as they are completely unforeseen, and don’t necessarily result from physician error. Rather, they occur when a patient’s health status has changed, and a previously safe medication becomes unsafe.

MedAware uses AI to detect outlier prescriptions.  It seems that everything is being labeled AI, so how does this work and how effective is it at detecting medication errors?

AI is best used to analyze large scale data to identify patterns and outliers to those patterns. The common theme in industries, such as aviation, cyber security and credit card fraud, is that they are rich with millions of transactions, 99.99% of which are okay. But, a small fraction of them are hazardous, and these dangers most often occur in new and unexpected ways. In these industries, AI is used to crunch millions of transactions, identify patterns, and most importantly, identify outliers to those patterns as potential hazards with high accuracy.

Medication safety is similar to these industries. Here too, millions of medications are prescribed and dispensed every day, and in 99.99% of cases, the right medication is prescribed and dispensed to the right patient. But, on rare occasions, an unexpected error or oversight may put patients at risk. MedAware analyzes millions of clinical records to identify errors and oversights as statistical outliers to the normal behavioral patterns of providers treating similar patients. Our data shows that this methodology, identifies errors and ADEs with high accuracy and clinical relevance and that most of the errors found by our system would not have been caught by any other existing system.

Are most of the errors you find obvious errors that a human could have detected but just missed or are you finding surprising errors as well?  Can you share some stories of what you’ve found?

The errors that we find are obvious errors; any physician would agree that they are indeed erroneous. These include: prescribing chemotherapy to healthy individuals, not stopping anticoagulation to a bleeding patient, birth control pills to a 70-year-old male and prescribing Viagra to a 2-year-old baby. All of these are obvious errors, so why didn’t the prescribers pick these up? The answer is simple: they are human, and humans err, especially when they are less experienced and over worked. Our software is able to mirror back to the providers the crowdsourced behavioral patterns of their peers and identify outliers to these patterns as errors.

You recently announced a partnership with Allscripts and their dbMotion interoperability solution.  How does that work and what’s the impact of this partnership?

Today’s healthcare systems have created a reality where patient health information can be scattered across multiple health systems, infrastructures and EHRs. The dbMotion health information exchange platform aggregates and harmonizes that scattered patient data, delivering the information clinicians need in a usable and actionable format at the point of care, within the provider’s native and familiar workflow. With dbMotion, all of the patient’s records are in one place. MedAware sits on top of the bdMotion interoperability platform as a layer of safety, accurately looking at the thousands of clinical inputs in the system and warning with even greater accuracy. MedAware catches various medication errors that would have been missed due to a decentralized patient health record. In addition to identifying prescription-based medication errors, MedAware can also notify physicians of patients who are at risk of opioid addiction.

This partnership will allow any institution using Allscripts’ dbMotion to easily implement MedAware’s system in a streamlined manner, with each installation being quick and effortless.

Once MedAware identifies a prescription error, how do you communicate that information back to the provider? Do you integrate your solution with the EHR vendor?

Yes, MedAware is integrated with EHR platforms. This is necessary for error detection and communication of the warning to the provider. There are two intervention scenarios: 1) Synchronous – when errors are caught at the point of order entry, a popup alert appears within the EHR user interface, without disturbing the provider’s workflow, and the provider can choose to accept or reject the alert. 2) Asynchronous – the errors/ADE is caught following a change in the patient’s clinical record (i.e. new lab result or vital sign), long after the prescription was entered. These alerts are displayed as a physician’s task, within the physician’s workflow and the EHR’s user interface.

What’s next for MedAware?  Where are you planning to take this technology?

The next steps for us are:

  1. Scale our current technology to grow to 20 million lives analyzed by 2020
  2. Create additional patient safety centered solutions to providers, such as opioid dependency risk assessment, gaps in care and trend projection analysis.
  3. Share our life-saving insights directly to those who need it most – consumers.

Epic to Hold Startup Competition at App Orchard Conference

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know it’s Friday and we usually do a Fun Friday post, but while this might look like a joke I assure you it’s not. Epic has recently announced to their App Orchard community that they’ll be doing a startup competition. The prize is $5k and “an opportunity to share their pitch with a senior Epic executive to get feedback and advice, and bragging rights.”

The startup competition is being held at the Epic App Orchard Conference happening Oct 24-26th at Epic’s headquarters in Verona. For those not familiar with App Orchard, it’s basically Epic’s partner program. The Founder or CEO of the startup is required to be there to be part of the Startup Pitch competition.

The contest is a little confusing because all tiers of App Orchard members are eligible to participate. However, companies don’t have to have to have an app in the app store yet. This would have been even more interesting if they opened it up outside the App Orchard community as well. However, given the short time frame to submit and then be on stage at the conference, I have a feeling this was a kind of last minute idea that they’re making happen and so they wanted to keep it simple.

Who would have thought that Epic would hold a startup competition? Is Epic finally seeing that there’s a lot of value to them and more importantly to their customers to have a more open approach to working with partners? Ok. A startup competition is a small step, but it feels like a huge one for Epic given past history.

The deadline to apply for the competition is Sep 28th, so it might be tight for companies that aren’t already a member of App Orchard to become a member and take part, but I’d be interested to hear if any company tries. I’ll be interested to hear what companies choose to take part in the competition and what ideas they pitch. Epic is currently displaying 111 apps in their App Orchard gallery.

Times are a changing at Epic. What’s next for Epic? They’re going to start acquiring companies? Let’s not get too crazy.

Latest Apple Watch to Cure Heart Disease (Yes, That’s the Sarcasm Font)

Posted on September 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

By this point, I think that most people have seen the big announcement coming out of the Apple event that the Apple Watch 4 now has ECG and other heart monitoring capabilities built in. The watch will notify you if your heart rate is too low and instances of atrial fibrillation that it detects. Plus, all of this is done as an FDA cleared device (some are reporting that Apple got their FDA clearance in 30 days which is crazy fast for a medical device).

The response to this announcement has been quite interesting. Most aren’t surprised that Apple has been moving more and more into healthcare. Plus, there have been a lot of reports that have mistakenly called this the first consumer ECG which it’s not. AliveCor deserves that credit and I recently wrote about another consumer ECG which is just one of many that are coming. However, many are suggesting that the Apple Watch will be the first time that many younger, healthier people will be regularly using an ECG like this. That’s an interesting idea.

As you might have assumed by the title of this post, I think the Apple Watch announcement isn’t much ado about nothing, but it’s also not the announcement of “sliced bread” being invented either. Let’s dive into what this announcement really means for healthcare.

As I mentioned when I wrote about the other consumer ECG, there’s currently somewhat limited value in what can be done with a single lead ECG. So, it’s important to keep this Apple Watch announcement in the right perspective even though I’m sure most consumers won’t understand these details. One person even commented on how Apple created messaging that calls it an “intelligent health guardian” to confuse people while still avoiding liability:

Perception sells and Apple is as good at creating perception as anyone. Will many more people buy an Apple Watch if they perceive it as something that will help them monitor their health better? Definitely. However, there are some other consequences that many doctors are warning about when it comes to this type of tracking hitting the masses.

First up is Dr. Nick van Terheyden who provides a comparative example of why all this “testing” could lead to a lot of incidentloma’s (Nice word I assume he made up to describe false positives in health tests):

A nephrologist at Cricket Health, Carmen A. Peralta, chimed in with this perspective:

The problem with these devices is that it’s not in Apple’s best interest to truly educate a patient on what the device can and can’t do. If a single lead ECG like this was a reliable arbitrator of when to go to the ED or when to not go, then it would be extremely valuable. However, many doctors I’ve talked to are suggesting that a single lead ECG isn’t sufficient for this type of information. So, a false negative or a false positive from the Apple Watch can provide incorrect reassurance or unfortunate anxiety that is dangerous. Who’s going to communicate this information to the unsuspecting Apple Watch buyer? My guess is relatively no one.

Another doctor made this ironic observation when it comes to the false positives the Apple Watch will produce:

You can just imagine the Apple Watch template in an EHR system. I wonder if it will include an Apple Watch education sheet. Maybe the EHR could send that education sheet to their watch instead of the portal. Wishful thinking…I know.

Another doctor made this poignant observation about the announcement:

We could go on for a while about prevention versus diagnosis. However, I don’t think it’s really an either or proposition. Prevention is great, but detection and diagnosis are as well since we can’t prevent everything.

This MD/PhD student summed up where we’re at with these consumer health devices really well:

I agree completely. The Apple Watch is directionally good, but still far away from really making a significant impact on health and/or our healthcare sysetm.

Video Games and Healthcare IT – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 11, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/14 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from @HealthcareScene on the topic of “Video Games and Healthcare IT“.
I’ve been thinking a lot about the #HITsm chat and it’s evolution since the beginning. As my colleague Colin Hung knows, I’ve long been asking what the future of the chats will be and what’s the value the community can receive from these chats. I’ll admit that I’m still not sure all the answers to those questions, so I’d love to hear your thoughts.

With that said, I do think Twitter chats have been great for two things: connections and learning.

I think the #HITsm chat has served me and many in the community well on both accounts. In the beginning, Twitter chats were an excellent way for us to discover and connect with new and interesting people who were working in the field of healthcare IT. No doubt many of us found hundreds of new friends who were as passionate about the user of technology in healthcare as us. It was an amazing thing and provided so much value to everyone involved. This led to in person meetups that took all of those connections to new levels.

While this still happens today, there is a bit of a diminishing returns that happens now that so many of us know each other so well both online and in person. I’ll be interested to see how this evolves since we still do get new people who join these chats, but even then I wonder how they feel entering a community that kind of already knows each other.

The other clear goal from Twitter chats is learning. It’s always great to take part in a topic where so many experts come together and share knowledge. However, is this the best way to learn? Is there a way we could leverage the community more for learning? Is there a way we could involve more experts to increase the learning and sharing even more? These are all open questions that I’m trying to figure out and would love your thoughts.

As I thought about these things, one thing I realized is that some of the best parts of Twitter chats is connecting around common pieces of humanity. Things like travel, music, geek stuff, and food were always tangential topics that often revealed a different side of people in the community. I loved these tangents (as many people likely realized) because it created a new type of connection with someone in the community. Long story short, I wondered if we could create more of this type of interaction to strengthen bonds in the community in ways we couldn’t plan.

That’s the genesis of this week’s #HITsm chat. Let’s talk about a topic that no doubt many in the community know and love: video games. Most of us have gone through multiple generations of video games. Let’s spend some time sharing some nostalgic moments from video games to connect with others in the community. Then, we’ll also look at how our experience with video games could inform our work in healthcare IT.

We hope you’ll join us for this week’s #HITsm chat on video games. I’m sure we have some passionate memories that will be shared and possibly some new ideas and perspectives on how we can make healthcare better.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What was your first video game system? How’d you get it? What games did you have? #HITsm

T2: Name your top 5 video games and why you loved them. Any memories or special moments with those video games are welcome too. #HITsm

T3: What did video games teach you (good or bad)? #HITsm

T4: Where would you like to see video game principles included in healthcare IT? Share some examples of how healthcare would benefit if it was more like video games. #HITsm

T5: Analogies are fun. What parallels can you draw between video game experiences and healthcare IT? #HITsm

Bonus: If you could create a special power (like they do in video games) what would it be? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.