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Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 18, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop on the topic of “Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients“.

I, Jen Horonjeff, have a confession – I’m one of the dreaded “non-compliant” patients you hear about. I have been living with juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases for 33 years, so I often have a complex treatment plan. One of my biggest offenses is I don’t get my blood work done every four weeks, which is the regularity for which my doctor has ordered my labs.

I don’t have a fear of needles, it’s also relatively quick to drop into the lab and do, so why don’t I do it?

Because every time I do, the system fails me. The lab inevitably sends me a bill for an exorbitant amount of money claiming my insurance won’t cover it. That’s incorrect, they will, it’s just been billed incorrectly. Yet it’s up to me as a patient to sit on the phone for hours with the lab, the insurance company, my doctor’s office, and probably a friend to vent about it…again.

Healthcare, its systems, products and services, are supposed to improve the lives of patients and families, not create more headaches. But the problem is, until recently, no one really ever asked the patients what they were going through, what mattered to them, or their input how to fix it. Patients have been the recipients of the systems we develop, rather than the co-creators.

This is where human-centered design comes in. Human-centered design is about taking the time to #askpatients and design solutions to fit them, rather than continually have them navigate systems and tools that, at times, feel like a cruel joke. I’m not a bad patient because I don’t get my labs done. I am just exhausted by a system that did not incorporate proper human-centered design.

We all have a role to play to improve this. After a lifetime of stumbling through the healthcare system, I decided to do something about it and started Savvy Cooperative. Savvy is a patient-owned co-op that provides a marketplace for patient insights. Our goal is to make it so easy to connect and work with patients and healthcare consumers there is no excuse not to. I believe the future of healthcare is co-designed with patients.

As you go about your work or interface with the healthcare system, I hope you’ll be on the lookout for all the hoops patients jump through and think, “did anyone #askpatients about this?”

If you need examples where lack of human-centered design affects patients, check out some of our #MessedUpPtExp videos, featuring our friendly Savvy Puppets. Then, join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we’ll discuss it in further detail.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
Ice Breaker: We’ve got a Spotify playlist going of song titles that describe the current state of healthcare – what would you add to our #HealthcareSoundtrack? #HITsm

T1: Everyone has one, what’s one of the messed up patient experiences you’ve personally gone through or heard someone else go through that showed lack of human-centered design? #HITsm

T2: How can technology help to ease these headaches and improve the patient experience, rather than make it worse (feel free to use responses from T1 for inspiration!)? #HITsm

T3: Do you think patients can bring unique and valuable perspectives to the table that can make these technologies even better, and how so? #HITsm

T4: Let’s lay it out there, what are the reasons you have heard for why people or companies don’t work more directly with patients? #HITsm

T5: Some of the big consumer brands have mastered the user experience, but what do they need to do to truly improve the patient experience? #HITsm

Bonus: Who are some of the companies or individuals you feel are winning at human-centered design in healthcare, and what are they doing to show that? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Applying AI Based Outlier Detection to Healthcare – Interview with Dr. Gidi Stein from MedAware

Posted on September 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most people who receive healthcare understand that healthcare is as much art as it is science. We don’t expect our doctors to be perfect or know everything because the human body is just too complex and there are so many factors that influence health. What’s hard for patients to understand is when obvious human errors occur. This is especially true when technology or multiple layers of humans should have caught the obvious.

This is exactly why I was excited to interview Dr. Gidi Stein, CEO and Co-founder of MedAware. As stated on their website, their goal is to eliminate prescription errors. In the interview below, you’ll learn more about what MedAware and Dr. Stein are doing to achieve this goal.

Tell us a little about yourself and MedAware.

Early in my career, I worked in the Israeli high-tech industry and served as CTO and Chief Architect of several algorithm-rich startups. However, after many years working in technology, I decided to return to school and study medicine. In 2002, I graduated from Tel Aviv University Medical School with a specialization in internal medicine, treating patients and teaching students and residents in one of Israel’s largest hospitals.

After working as a physician for several years, I heard a heartbreaking story, which ultimately served as my motivation and inspiration to found MedAware. A physician was treating a 9-year-old boy who suffered from Asthma. To treat the symptoms, the physician entered the electronic prescribing environment and selected Singulair from the drop-down menu, a standard treatment for asthma. However, unfortunately, he accidentally clicked Sintrom, an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Tragically, neither the physician, pharmacist nor parent caught this error, which resulted in the boys’ untimely death. This avoidable, medication-related complication and death was caused by a typo.

Having worked as a physician for many years, I had a difficult time understanding that with all the medical intervention and technological support we rely on, our healthcare system was not intelligent enough to prevent errors like this. This was a symptom of a greater challenge; how can we identify and prevent medication related complications before they occur? Given my combined background in technology and medicine, I knew that there must be a solution to eliminate these types of needless errors. I founded MedAware to transform patient safety and save lives.

Describe the problem with prescription-based medication errors that exists today.  What’s the cause of most of these errors?

Every year in the U.S. alone, there are 1.5 million preventable medication errors, which result in patient injury or death. In fact, medication errors are the third leading cause of death in the US, and errors related to incorrect prescription are a major part of these. Today’s prescription-related complications fall into two main categories: medication errors that occur at the point of order entry (like the example of the 9yr old boy) and errors that result from evolving adverse drug events (ADEs). Point of order entry errors are a consequence of medication reconciliation challenges, typos, incorrect dosage input and other clinical inconsistencies.

Evolving ADEs are, in fact, the bulk of the errors that occur – almost 2/3 of errors are those that happen after a medication was correctly prescribed. These are often the most catastrophic errors, as they are completely unforeseen, and don’t necessarily result from physician error. Rather, they occur when a patient’s health status has changed, and a previously safe medication becomes unsafe.

MedAware uses AI to detect outlier prescriptions.  It seems that everything is being labeled AI, so how does this work and how effective is it at detecting medication errors?

AI is best used to analyze large scale data to identify patterns and outliers to those patterns. The common theme in industries, such as aviation, cyber security and credit card fraud, is that they are rich with millions of transactions, 99.99% of which are okay. But, a small fraction of them are hazardous, and these dangers most often occur in new and unexpected ways. In these industries, AI is used to crunch millions of transactions, identify patterns, and most importantly, identify outliers to those patterns as potential hazards with high accuracy.

Medication safety is similar to these industries. Here too, millions of medications are prescribed and dispensed every day, and in 99.99% of cases, the right medication is prescribed and dispensed to the right patient. But, on rare occasions, an unexpected error or oversight may put patients at risk. MedAware analyzes millions of clinical records to identify errors and oversights as statistical outliers to the normal behavioral patterns of providers treating similar patients. Our data shows that this methodology, identifies errors and ADEs with high accuracy and clinical relevance and that most of the errors found by our system would not have been caught by any other existing system.

Are most of the errors you find obvious errors that a human could have detected but just missed or are you finding surprising errors as well?  Can you share some stories of what you’ve found?

The errors that we find are obvious errors; any physician would agree that they are indeed erroneous. These include: prescribing chemotherapy to healthy individuals, not stopping anticoagulation to a bleeding patient, birth control pills to a 70-year-old male and prescribing Viagra to a 2-year-old baby. All of these are obvious errors, so why didn’t the prescribers pick these up? The answer is simple: they are human, and humans err, especially when they are less experienced and over worked. Our software is able to mirror back to the providers the crowdsourced behavioral patterns of their peers and identify outliers to these patterns as errors.

You recently announced a partnership with Allscripts and their dbMotion interoperability solution.  How does that work and what’s the impact of this partnership?

Today’s healthcare systems have created a reality where patient health information can be scattered across multiple health systems, infrastructures and EHRs. The dbMotion health information exchange platform aggregates and harmonizes that scattered patient data, delivering the information clinicians need in a usable and actionable format at the point of care, within the provider’s native and familiar workflow. With dbMotion, all of the patient’s records are in one place. MedAware sits on top of the bdMotion interoperability platform as a layer of safety, accurately looking at the thousands of clinical inputs in the system and warning with even greater accuracy. MedAware catches various medication errors that would have been missed due to a decentralized patient health record. In addition to identifying prescription-based medication errors, MedAware can also notify physicians of patients who are at risk of opioid addiction.

This partnership will allow any institution using Allscripts’ dbMotion to easily implement MedAware’s system in a streamlined manner, with each installation being quick and effortless.

Once MedAware identifies a prescription error, how do you communicate that information back to the provider? Do you integrate your solution with the EHR vendor?

Yes, MedAware is integrated with EHR platforms. This is necessary for error detection and communication of the warning to the provider. There are two intervention scenarios: 1) Synchronous – when errors are caught at the point of order entry, a popup alert appears within the EHR user interface, without disturbing the provider’s workflow, and the provider can choose to accept or reject the alert. 2) Asynchronous – the errors/ADE is caught following a change in the patient’s clinical record (i.e. new lab result or vital sign), long after the prescription was entered. These alerts are displayed as a physician’s task, within the physician’s workflow and the EHR’s user interface.

What’s next for MedAware?  Where are you planning to take this technology?

The next steps for us are:

  1. Scale our current technology to grow to 20 million lives analyzed by 2020
  2. Create additional patient safety centered solutions to providers, such as opioid dependency risk assessment, gaps in care and trend projection analysis.
  3. Share our life-saving insights directly to those who need it most – consumers.

Epic to Hold Startup Competition at App Orchard Conference

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know it’s Friday and we usually do a Fun Friday post, but while this might look like a joke I assure you it’s not. Epic has recently announced to their App Orchard community that they’ll be doing a startup competition. The prize is $5k and “an opportunity to share their pitch with a senior Epic executive to get feedback and advice, and bragging rights.”

The startup competition is being held at the Epic App Orchard Conference happening Oct 24-26th at Epic’s headquarters in Verona. For those not familiar with App Orchard, it’s basically Epic’s partner program. The Founder or CEO of the startup is required to be there to be part of the Startup Pitch competition.

The contest is a little confusing because all tiers of App Orchard members are eligible to participate. However, companies don’t have to have to have an app in the app store yet. This would have been even more interesting if they opened it up outside the App Orchard community as well. However, given the short time frame to submit and then be on stage at the conference, I have a feeling this was a kind of last minute idea that they’re making happen and so they wanted to keep it simple.

Who would have thought that Epic would hold a startup competition? Is Epic finally seeing that there’s a lot of value to them and more importantly to their customers to have a more open approach to working with partners? Ok. A startup competition is a small step, but it feels like a huge one for Epic given past history.

The deadline to apply for the competition is Sep 28th, so it might be tight for companies that aren’t already a member of App Orchard to become a member and take part, but I’d be interested to hear if any company tries. I’ll be interested to hear what companies choose to take part in the competition and what ideas they pitch. Epic is currently displaying 111 apps in their App Orchard gallery.

Times are a changing at Epic. What’s next for Epic? They’re going to start acquiring companies? Let’s not get too crazy.

Latest Apple Watch to Cure Heart Disease (Yes, That’s the Sarcasm Font)

Posted on September 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

By this point, I think that most people have seen the big announcement coming out of the Apple event that the Apple Watch 4 now has ECG and other heart monitoring capabilities built in. The watch will notify you if your heart rate is too low and instances of atrial fibrillation that it detects. Plus, all of this is done as an FDA cleared device (some are reporting that Apple got their FDA clearance in 30 days which is crazy fast for a medical device).

The response to this announcement has been quite interesting. Most aren’t surprised that Apple has been moving more and more into healthcare. Plus, there have been a lot of reports that have mistakenly called this the first consumer ECG which it’s not. AliveCor deserves that credit and I recently wrote about another consumer ECG which is just one of many that are coming. However, many are suggesting that the Apple Watch will be the first time that many younger, healthier people will be regularly using an ECG like this. That’s an interesting idea.

As you might have assumed by the title of this post, I think the Apple Watch announcement isn’t much ado about nothing, but it’s also not the announcement of “sliced bread” being invented either. Let’s dive into what this announcement really means for healthcare.

As I mentioned when I wrote about the other consumer ECG, there’s currently somewhat limited value in what can be done with a single lead ECG. So, it’s important to keep this Apple Watch announcement in the right perspective even though I’m sure most consumers won’t understand these details. One person even commented on how Apple created messaging that calls it an “intelligent health guardian” to confuse people while still avoiding liability:

Perception sells and Apple is as good at creating perception as anyone. Will many more people buy an Apple Watch if they perceive it as something that will help them monitor their health better? Definitely. However, there are some other consequences that many doctors are warning about when it comes to this type of tracking hitting the masses.

First up is Dr. Nick van Terheyden who provides a comparative example of why all this “testing” could lead to a lot of incidentloma’s (Nice word I assume he made up to describe false positives in health tests):

A nephrologist at Cricket Health, Carmen A. Peralta, chimed in with this perspective:

The problem with these devices is that it’s not in Apple’s best interest to truly educate a patient on what the device can and can’t do. If a single lead ECG like this was a reliable arbitrator of when to go to the ED or when to not go, then it would be extremely valuable. However, many doctors I’ve talked to are suggesting that a single lead ECG isn’t sufficient for this type of information. So, a false negative or a false positive from the Apple Watch can provide incorrect reassurance or unfortunate anxiety that is dangerous. Who’s going to communicate this information to the unsuspecting Apple Watch buyer? My guess is relatively no one.

Another doctor made this ironic observation when it comes to the false positives the Apple Watch will produce:

You can just imagine the Apple Watch template in an EHR system. I wonder if it will include an Apple Watch education sheet. Maybe the EHR could send that education sheet to their watch instead of the portal. Wishful thinking…I know.

Another doctor made this poignant observation about the announcement:

We could go on for a while about prevention versus diagnosis. However, I don’t think it’s really an either or proposition. Prevention is great, but detection and diagnosis are as well since we can’t prevent everything.

This MD/PhD student summed up where we’re at with these consumer health devices really well:

I agree completely. The Apple Watch is directionally good, but still far away from really making a significant impact on health and/or our healthcare sysetm.

Video Games and Healthcare IT – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 11, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/14 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from @HealthcareScene on the topic of “Video Games and Healthcare IT“.
I’ve been thinking a lot about the #HITsm chat and it’s evolution since the beginning. As my colleague Colin Hung knows, I’ve long been asking what the future of the chats will be and what’s the value the community can receive from these chats. I’ll admit that I’m still not sure all the answers to those questions, so I’d love to hear your thoughts.

With that said, I do think Twitter chats have been great for two things: connections and learning.

I think the #HITsm chat has served me and many in the community well on both accounts. In the beginning, Twitter chats were an excellent way for us to discover and connect with new and interesting people who were working in the field of healthcare IT. No doubt many of us found hundreds of new friends who were as passionate about the user of technology in healthcare as us. It was an amazing thing and provided so much value to everyone involved. This led to in person meetups that took all of those connections to new levels.

While this still happens today, there is a bit of a diminishing returns that happens now that so many of us know each other so well both online and in person. I’ll be interested to see how this evolves since we still do get new people who join these chats, but even then I wonder how they feel entering a community that kind of already knows each other.

The other clear goal from Twitter chats is learning. It’s always great to take part in a topic where so many experts come together and share knowledge. However, is this the best way to learn? Is there a way we could leverage the community more for learning? Is there a way we could involve more experts to increase the learning and sharing even more? These are all open questions that I’m trying to figure out and would love your thoughts.

As I thought about these things, one thing I realized is that some of the best parts of Twitter chats is connecting around common pieces of humanity. Things like travel, music, geek stuff, and food were always tangential topics that often revealed a different side of people in the community. I loved these tangents (as many people likely realized) because it created a new type of connection with someone in the community. Long story short, I wondered if we could create more of this type of interaction to strengthen bonds in the community in ways we couldn’t plan.

That’s the genesis of this week’s #HITsm chat. Let’s talk about a topic that no doubt many in the community know and love: video games. Most of us have gone through multiple generations of video games. Let’s spend some time sharing some nostalgic moments from video games to connect with others in the community. Then, we’ll also look at how our experience with video games could inform our work in healthcare IT.

We hope you’ll join us for this week’s #HITsm chat on video games. I’m sure we have some passionate memories that will be shared and possibly some new ideas and perspectives on how we can make healthcare better.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What was your first video game system? How’d you get it? What games did you have? #HITsm

T2: Name your top 5 video games and why you loved them. Any memories or special moments with those video games are welcome too. #HITsm

T3: What did video games teach you (good or bad)? #HITsm

T4: Where would you like to see video game principles included in healthcare IT? Share some examples of how healthcare would benefit if it was more like video games. #HITsm

T5: Analogies are fun. What parallels can you draw between video game experiences and healthcare IT? #HITsm

Bonus: If you could create a special power (like they do in video games) what would it be? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Healthcare Compliance Humor – Fun Friday

Posted on September 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

There are a lot of things that are messed up in healthcare. One of those is some of the compliance requirements. The challenge we face is that a lot of regulations were put on with good intentions, but either they don’t hit the mark or things evolve and we never get rid or old regulations that don’t serve us anymore.

With that in mind, you’ll enjoy this Fun Friday humor from Master Control. This feels a lot like what it takes to get anything done in healthcare.

Have a great weekend!

International Healthcare: Standards, Patients, and Personal Experiences – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 6, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/7 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jessica Maxine Selby (@JessMSelby) on the topic of “International Healthcare: Standards, Patients, and Personal Experiences“.

Jess Maxine Selby considers herself a Global Citizen. Living in 4 countries over 3 continents and traveling to over 26 countries in 26 years, this accident-prone marketer has personally experienced what many countries healthcare system has to offer. Due to her passion for community service and a two-week adventure with Global Medical Brigades in Ghana, Jess chose to direct her career path towards the healthcare market.

Now she spearheads the marketing department at Info World, the first niche e-health company in Romania. Established in 2000, Info World is a leader in the Romanian healthcare market supplying software solutions to both the private and public sector, resulting in a markets share of over 40% of the country’s hospital beds. Alongside their primary partners MedicaSoft in the United States, and with contracts in England, South Africa, Venezuela and beyond, Info World brings a wealth of experience to the global healthcare sphere. From complying with international standards and security protocols to hands-on implementation experience with doctors and in hospitals, Info World has offered efficient and effective solutions that cross borders and cultures to supply complete e-health solutions.

Considering the fact that cross-cultural communication is a daily occurrence, the ease with which we can be in a new country by morning, and the rise of migration, there are some industry standards that should be internationally recognized and accepted. In a world where standardization is dissimilar in neighbor countries and even neighboring counties, interoperability is a distant possibility in developing countries, and many of today’s deaths are due to our reaction based healthcare rather than prevention focused I ask you for your opinions. E-Health is a field of endless possibility, connection, and communication; what do you dream of doing and how would you positively impact the current state of health worldwide?

We hope you’ll join us for this week’s #HITsm chat on International Healthcare.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Have you had any personal experiences as a patient with international healthcare? If so, tell us about them! #HITsm

T2: What do you consider to be some of the biggest healthcare issues globally? Both in developing countries and developed ones. #HITsm

T3: If one worldwide healthcare system were possible, what are some capabilities you would want to see present? #HITsm

T4: Have you personally or professionally seen any changes since the E.U.’s GDPR went into action on May 28th, 2018? #HITsm

T5: Do you see any positive or negative ways we can impact healthcare on a global scale? #HITsm

Bonus: If you could travel to any international health IT conference, which would you attend? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/14 – Healthcare Lessons Learned from Video Games
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from @HealthcareScene

9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #PatientsMatter
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – TBD
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Happy Labor Day!

Posted on September 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

What’s on your schedule today? Do you have fun plans with family? Are you off work or are you still at the hospital? Are you planning to grill today or do you have some other tradition? For good or for bad I don’t have any plans today. In many ways, that makes me happy. Sometimes no plans are the best kind of plans. Regardless of your plans, Happy Labor Day!

The Cloud – Fun Friday

Posted on August 31, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Leave it to the one and only Dr. Deborah C. Peel, MD from Patient Privacy Rights to share with me this humorous look at the cloud and how many of us treat the cloud. I’m sure nothing like this would ever happen in healthcare. However, it sure does offer an interesting perspective of the cloud. This is particularly true with individual patients. I hope you enjoy learning about the cloud from Kitty Flanagan.

Will Big Media Spoil HealthIT for the Little Guy? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on August 28, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 8/31 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by ShereeseM, MS/MBA (@ShereesePubHlth) on the topic of “Will Big Media Spoil HealthIT for the Little Guy?“.

We’ve all witnessed big tech’s recent push into healthcare. Atul Gawande is in a deal with Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway, and it looks like we might be seeing our EOBs being sent to us from Google fairly soon. Amazon’s hired 20,000 doctors. Ok, that was an Onion article, but illustrates the point.  And now comes big media into our little world. And in an industry that still resists change, healthcare technology is still small. But what would make media companies want to dabble in the healthcare IT space. Well, to understand the why, you must first understand the who.

The “who” is Comcast Corporation. Comcast, the big media company, best known for broadband solutions, is now making a play for healthcare technology. Comcast recently entered a joint venture with the Independence Healthcare Group, in which the two will build patient-centered digital platforms for Comcast’s 60 million plus customers. The collaboration looks to make the patient-provider communications seamless by allowing patients to view needed information and to-do lists prior to operations and other engagements. Time will tell if this is finally the project for Comcast, as their prior attempts to break into the market, initially partnering with Kaiser Permanente on a now defunct pregnancy app and later with a UC Davis partnership on health and nutrition videos, were both colossal failures.

The “who is also Cox Communications. Cox tried to make a statement in the healthcare IT space by partnering with Cleveland Clinic to develop Vivre Health, a home health product and service delivered by broadband. The venture failed and Cox eventually pulled out. But like Comcast, Cox believes they have now found their footing. They are banking on the value of remote patient monitoring and in 2015 they purchased Trapolla. The product is now in development.

Now that we know the who, let’s concentrate on the why. The easy answer is market share. The healthcare market is worth more than 3 trillion dollars, according to CMS estimates. It’s only intuitive that other industries would come calling. Media companies may see healthcare IT as an opportunity to capitalize on a growing industry while their own industry may be cooling off. Companies have to leverage their current capabilities to drive growth in others sectors. Media companies are in a unique position to do just this.

The interest in healthcare tech by big media may have a negative impact on smaller or independent brands. Based on broadband alone, smaller companies can’t compete on the scale of companies like Comcast and Cox Communications. Could the current interest in the market, which is growing, mark the end for smaller companies? Time will tell but what is certain is that nothing in healthcare comes quickly. Big media may find it hard disrupting in healthcare where the small guy may already have the lay of the land. And small or not, already vested players won’t sit idly by while big media giants come it and try to dim their flame.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat to discuss big media in healthcare. What will be the impact for good and/or bad? How will they fair? Is this a good choice for them?

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Does big media belong in healthIT? #HITsm

T2: Will big media make seismic gains and at what cost to smaller companies? #HITsm

T3: What sound contributions can media make to health IT? #HITsm

T4: How can smaller companies compete with big media in the health IT space? #HITsm

T5: Given; healthcare is like no other industry, due to regulations. Will the complexity of it discourage big media? #HITsm

Bonus: Big media and big tech, what problems in healthcare would you like to see them tackle? Price Transparency? Prescription drugs? The opioid crisis? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/7 – International Healthcare: Standards, Patients, and Personal Experiences
Hosted by Jessica Maxine Selby (@JessMSelby)

9/14 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #PatientsMatter
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – TBD
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.