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Now That We Found [Patients], What Are We Going To Do? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 11, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/14 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Claire Pfarr (@clairepfarr) from @OneViewHC and the @Savvy_Coop Community on the topic of “Now That We Found [Patients], What Are We Going To Do?“.

HITsm 90s Rewind… (Note the 90s music links)

For years, the health industry has been talking about being more patient-centered, but weren’t doing it effectively. A lot of companies wouldn’t touch working with patients, while others said they’d do anything to help patients, but didn’t walk the talk. Meanwhile for patients, the idea that the system cared about their needs seemed like a fantasy.

We are at a crossroad, where some companies will continue down a familiar path, where others will choose to walk hand and hand with patients and forge a new trail.

Companies who put more money and effort into uncovering true patient priorities will have a bigger impact by solving the problems patients actually have. These can be big problems–like finding cures–to smaller quality of life measures that have a big impact. For example, one thing Oneview learned was that environmental factors like room lighting and temperature, made patients more uncomfortable in their hospital rooms, and were problems they could help solve. It might not be sexy, but it makes a difference for patients. Healthcare doesn’t always have to be a jagged little pill.

The best way to identify these patient priorities is to work directly with patients. More companies and innovators are getting on board with the need to work with patients, but don’t necessarily know where to find them and how to work with them. Some might ask a patient or two, but you get what you give, and that may not be sufficient to understand the full patient experience. The more patient voices you can learn from, the better.

That’s why Oneview and Savvy Cooperative have teamed up to offer the first Savvy Co-op Membership Drive. Savvy is a patient-owned co-op that helps companies get the patient insights they need to build better products and services. It is collectively owned by its patient members, and during the co-op drive we are getting the word out to give more patients a voice! And if that wasn’t exciting enough, between now and Dec 31st, members have the chance to win weekly raffle prizes and could even win a trip to Orlando, FL for #HIMSS19! Make sure to join and refer members to win!

You can listen to Savvy’s #HITsm Rewind Playlist on Spotify to get inspired

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we talk about working with patients.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Think of the last time you went to a doctor’s office/hospital. What would have made that process better? (it may not be tech!) #HITsm

T2: What are ways your company or your work can support patients? #HITsm

T3: How do you think the patient voice is important in the work you personally do day-to-day? #HITsm

T4: How do you think large consumer brands will force healthcare to be more in touch with patients’ needs? #HITsm

T5: Oneview and Savvy Cooperative are sending more patients to #HIMSS19. Where do you think HIMSS could use a dose of patient perspective? #HITsm

BONUS: Turn a 90s song into a healthcare anthem #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/21 – Holiday Break

12/28 – Holiday Break

1/4 – 2019 New Years Predictions
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Which Are the Top Healthcare IT Cities?

Posted on December 10, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Whenever you talk about cities, people start getting really defensive. I guess that’s a good thing since many people are really proud of their cities. However, I saw this tweet and image from Rasu Shrestha about Nashville and I started thinking, “Which cities are the top healthcare IT cities?”

No doubt this chart makes a pretty impressive case for Nashville as one of the top healthcare IT cities. Although, this chart is really focused on Nashville as a healthcare city vs Nashville as a healthcare IT city? Is there a correlation?

I think there is to some extent. It’s really hard to have a healthcare IT city without a lot of great healthcare organizations. The two generally go together. Colin saw this first hand when he attended the Health:Further conference in Nashville. He certainly saw a lot of great healthcare IT companies at the event.

At HIMSS each year the good people of Atlanta, Georgia like to make the case that Atlanta is the healthcare IT capital of the world. This includes a big Georgia booth that includes a wide spectrum of Healthcare IT companies. I’m not sure how many people think of Atlanta when it comes to healthcare IT, but when you visit the Georgia booth at HIMSS, you realize that they may be right in saying they deserve the spot as the top healthcare IT city.

Another obvious choice for top healthcare IT cities is Boston. It helps to have Harvard and MIT in your area to prop up your city as a major healthcare IT city. Some really impressive healthcare organizations help as well. The only knock on Boston is that it does so much in the biotech world that it often can overwhelm the healthcare IT companies that are in the area. Regardless of that competition, Boston has some of the most innovative healthcare IT companies out there.

Many people like to mention San Diego as a great healthcare IT city. It gets a similar knock to Boston in that it’s often more life sciences vs healthcare IT.

Silicon Valley (San Francisco, etc) has to make the list just for the sheer number of startups they have working on healthcare IT. The challenge in Silicon Valley is that there’s not a great concentration of healthcare IT companies in any one place. In some ways that’s a good thing since those companies can pull from the mentality of other industries. In other ways, it misses out on the momentum and sharing of things that are unique to healthcare.

Chicago and New York City also have to be included on this list due to their sheer size. It’s amazing how many healthcare IT startup companies call these cities home. However, similar to silicon valley, the size of these cities also makes building the community a little harder. However, Matter in Chicago and Startup Health in NYC have done some good work in that regard.

I could keep going. It seems like there are healthcare IT startups happening in every city. Plus, there’s always the irony that some of the biggest healthcare IT companies are in cities like Verona, Wisconsin and Kansas City. Not the 2 cities you probably would have thought of first when you thought of top healthcare IT cities.

Which cities would you add to this list of top healthcare IT cities? Are there other elements I’m missing from the cities listed above? Let us know in the comments and on social media with @HealthcareScene. We’d love to hear what cities you think deserve to be on the list of top heathcare IT cities.

The Other Leadership Titles – Fun Friday

Posted on December 7, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today’s Fun Friday seems really appropriate after this week’s #HITsm chat on leadership. Thanks to David Chou for sharing this. I think all of these titles could give us all a second to pause and look at our leadership style. Sometimes titles like “VP of Stay the Course” could be a great title. However, others like VP of No aren’t so good. There’s a balance in leadership that’s highlighted in this cartoon.

Have a great weekend!

The Difficult Healthcare Problems Lie at the Crossroads

Posted on December 6, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Sometimes you stumble upon a quote which captures healthcare so perfectly. That’s what I felt when I heard this quote from Jonathan Sheldon at Oracle.

The real difficult problems sit at the crossroads of multiple domains – requires you to integrate data from separate domains.

-Jonathan Sheldon, Oracle

While many like to talk about the healthcare market, I’ve always felt that was a false framework. There’s no one healthcare market. At least not in the US. The world of healthcare is made up of hundreds of markets that have some overlaps and need to work together, but each market is very different. The simplest market to see is the ambulatory vs acute care vs post-acute care market. Each of these markets is so drastically different, that it’s really not useful to think of them as the same market. The same is true of specialties and even many regions.

The challenge of healthcare is that it spans all of these domains. And if you want to keep someone healthy and provide them an amazing patient experience, then you have to be able to span all of these different markets.

I guess that’s why the Jonathan Sheldon quote resonated with me so much. Healthcare faces a lot of difficult challenges, but one of the most difficult challenges is managing a patient’s care across all of these domains. All of us that have worked in healthcare have seen this first hand. It’s completely different cultures and often very different objectives.

While crossing these domains is one of the most challenging problems in healthcare, it is also some of the most rewarding.


Healthcare Leadership – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 4, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/7 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Michelle Currie (@mshlcurrie) on the topic of “Healthcare Leadership”.

An important truism in healthcare today is that change is the only constant. Indeed, it seems as if the entire world is changing at warp speed. The external and internal environment seems to be populated with a whole new set of rules, regulations, devices, diseases, and demands.

Consider the following set of terms added to the healthcare landscape: MACRA, Population Health management, accountable care, retail medicine, value-based purchasing, bronze/silver/gold/platinum health plans, Zika, personalized medicine, consumerism, bit data, artificial intelligence, blockchain, augmented reality. To quote the late Dr. Ken Cohn, the tectonic plates (of healthcare) are shifting.

Whether by incremental movement or in large, unexpected jolts, the environmental forces confronting healthcare leaders today are creating conditions that pose significant challenges to even the most experienced executives.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we talk about healthcare leadership.

Related Resources:

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: How do you define effective leadership in today’s healthcare environment? #HITsm

T2: What are the specific challenges facing healthcare leadership in today’s environment? #HITsm

T3: What are some necessary competencies for today’s healthcare leaders that may not have been as important a decade ago? #HITsm

T4: What positive and negative effects will the changing healthcare workforce demographics pose going forward? #HITsm

T5: Are certain leadership styles better than others for the current healthcare environment? #HITsm

Bonus: What skill have you added in the past 24 months that has catipulted your leadership effectiveness? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/14 – TBD
Hosted by Claire Pfarr (@clairepfarr) from @OneViewHC and the @Savvy_Coop Community

12/21 – Holiday Break

12/28 – Holiday Break

1/4 – 2019 New Years Predictions
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

The Global Impact of Health IT – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 27, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/30 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Vanessa Carter (@_FaceSA) on the topic of “The Global Impact of Health IT”.

Global health pandemics like antibiotic and antimicrobial resistance are among the most critical issues to tackle and in future will require robust, harmonious data surveillance systems along with mass co-operation between the animal, human and environmental health sectors across every country [1]. This is known as One Health [2]. WHO initiatives like GLASS (Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System) have been implemented to work towards these goals [3].

To help understand the topic of antibiotic resistance, let me start by saying that antibiotics treat bacterial infections whereas antimicrobials are a much broader term used to describe medicines that treat other types of microorganisms that cause infection. These other types of microorganisms include parasites (e.g. Malaria), fungi (e.g. Candida) and viruses (e.g. AIDS). All of these microbial infections are categorised as Communicable Diseases or Infectious Diseases. Antibiotics fall under the antimicrobial umbrella and they kill a microorganism known as bacteria. Antimicrobials, and particularly antibiotics are the cornerstone of modern medicine because they are used in all areas of disease treatments where the immune system is compromised including HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis, as well as Non-Communicable Diseases like Cancer and Diabetes where acquiring an infection is common such as during Chemotherapy. Antibiotics are also used for your everyday Strep throat, Gastrointestinal Infections (e.g. “Tummy bug”) or Urinary Tract Infections. They are also prescribed daily by dentists when we have tooth infections or for routine surgeries. Unfortunately, we are overusing antibiotics and bacteria are evolving resistance fast. This means that antibiotics are no longer working to treat common bacterial infections for many of these health conditions. What is even more frightening is that there are very few antibiotics in the pipeline. Some big pharma companies having abandoned research and development due to a lack of global data which helps to report prescribing and consumption behaviours which are contributing to resistance [4].

Antibiotic resistance is caused in various ways including through the overprescribing and misuse of antibiotics in both humans and animals. Resistant bacteria can also spread through bad hygiene practice (e.g. hand washing) or food production. The continual rise of antimicrobial resistance was recognised by the United Nations in 2016 in a high-level meeting as a serious threat to global health and human development [5] because of its severity and complexity. It has further been compared to climate change by UK economic experts like Lord Jim O’Niell [6] and invested in excessively by organisations including The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Wellcome Trust [7], particularly in Low-to-Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) where health systems are distressed and disease burdens are high.

This world has become increasingly more connected through trade and travel too, therefore tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance will probably remain impossible until we leverage the benefit of today’s digital technology to collect, process and analyse surveillance data at a national and global level. Whether or not and how health IT companies design solutions in the future taking this into consideration remains to be understood. For example, does it mean technology like EHRs should travel with us so that we improve our ability to capture holistic data, even when we’re out of our own country? What happens if we take a course of antibiotics and it never gets captured on our medical record, or worse, we pick up a disease and travel back afterwards with no data and that bacteria is a threat to our community. Shouldn’t we be considering these data gaps in all our systems? One thing is certain, without global surveillance, we couldn’t possibly begin to tackle this deadly pandemic that affects us all.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we talk about this global health challenge and how IT could potentially help with the problem.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What do you think makes global health IT difficult to achieve? #HITsm

T2: What technologies do you think could collect global data for antibiotic resistance? (e.g. EHRs) #HITsm

T3: How do you think global health IT could benefit other medical conditions? #HITsm

T4: What are you seeing locally that you would like to see spread globally? #HITsm

T5: Why do you feel global health IT is important to achieve? #HITsm

Bonus: With global health barriers like culture, education & language, how do we overcome that with technology? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/7 – Healthcare Leadership
Hosted by Michelle Currie (@mshlcurrie)

12/14 – TBD
Hosted by Claire Pfarr (@clairepfarr) from @OneViewHC and the @Savvy_Coop Community

12/21 – Holiday Break

12/28 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Black Friday in Healthcare

Posted on November 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we were heading into Black Friday, I wondered if anyone in healthcare was doing something for Black Friday. It’s such a big shopping day, I had to think that someone was getting involved. Turns out, I found a few things.

The first thing I found was a Medical Uniform Boutique in Downtown Lancaster, PA. They were promoting 10% off scrubs:

This actually felt pretty reasonable. Scrubs is something that makes a lot of sense for medical professionals to buy on Black Friday. Of course, the JustScrubz account only had 1 follower, so I’m not sure that promotion did very well. I did just feature it in this post. So, your welcome citizens of Lancaster.

Next up, I found a health insurance company offering a Black Friday special:


The tweet does seem to be advertising their online visits which could be a pretty valuable thing for people who might be traveling over Thanksgiving. It’s never fun to get sick while traveling, but always a pain to get care on the holidays. So, I’d say this online visit offer could be a pretty good one.

The next Black Friday deal I found for healthcare was from GE Healthcare Life Sciences. You can see the Black Friday landing page here. Looks like this is going to be a great place for you if you’re interested in Bioprocess, Genomics, Western Blotting & Imaging, Biacore chips and reagents, Purification: AKTA, columns and media, and Cell Culture. Sounds like some hot sellers to me. Who wouldn’t want to buy some genomics on Black Friday?

In case you’re interested in the GE Healthcare Life Sciences offer, they’ll be donating $10 to Seeding Labs for every purchase made during their Black Friday event. They have a goal of raising $10,000 which if my math is correct, that means they expect this Black Friday deal will be taken advantage of by at least 1000 people. Who knew that cell culture, genomics, and protein purification would be so popular on Black Friday.

I’ll admit that I’m not sure if I love or hate the use of Black Friday in healthcare. Certainly it’s a big shopping day and it makes sense for marketers to use it if they can effectively. No doubt we’ll see plenty of action from consumer health devices like 23 and Me and Fitbit. However, at some point the Black Friday tag doesn’t seem to fit.

I think my friend Grace Cordovano put it best:

I hope you’re enjoying your Black Friday and not spending too much money on Amazon. They get me every year.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Posted on November 22, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

It’s Thanksgiving Day. Hopefully, most of you aren’t reading this blog today, but are enjoying a great Thanksgiving feast with friends and family. We all have our own traditions and I know the holidays can be hard for some people. Especially those in healthcare who are stuck at work.

However, I saw this Thanksgiving message below and thought that regardless of my situation, I’ve always found this to be true. Even if I often don’t take enough time to look.

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you and thanks so much for being part of the Healthcare Scene community!

Cybersecurity Confidence and Cybersecurity Maturity

Posted on November 21, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Cybersecurity is the number one topic on most healthcare CIOs minds. It’s the number one thing that keeps them up at night. No doubt, it’s become one of the most challenging parts of their job.

These facts were illustrated really well in this chart that CIO, David Chou, shared on CIOs self reported confidence in IT security.

There’s been a drop in security trust in almost every industry, but the drop in healthcare’s trust in IT security is dramatic. As David Chou mentions, it’s likely due to all the incidents of ransomware and malware that have been all over healthcare.

What then can an organization do to improve this situation? What’s the right approach to be able to improve your confidence in your IT security?

David Chou also offered a great response to these questions in this cybersecurity maturity chart and the key to successfully implementing what’s in this chart:


There’s little doubt that effective cybersecurity takes the entire organization being on board. It can’t just be the job of the CIO or CEO or CISO. If that’s the case, it will fail and a breach will occur.

Looking at this chart, how is your organization doing on cybersecurity? How mature are your efforts? Is there room to improve?

Healthcare Interoperability is a Joke

Posted on November 20, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Did you see the big news last month about healthcare interoperability? That’s right, Carequality announced support for FHIR. Next thing you know, we’re going to get an announcement that CommonWell is going to support faxing.

Seriously, healthcare interoperability is a joke.

The reality is that no EHR vendor wants to do interoperability. And it’s not saying anything groundbreaking to say that Carequality and CommonWell are both driven by the EHR vendors. Unfortunately, I see these organizations as almost a smokescreen that allows EHR vendors to not be interoperable while allowing them to say that they’re working on interoperability.

I’d describe current interoperability efforts as a “just enough” approach to interoperability. EHR vendors want to do just enough to appease the call for interoperability by the government and other patient organizations. It’s not a real effort to be interoperable. That’s most EHR vendors. A few of them are even using interoperability as a weapon to keep vendors out and some are looking at interoperability as a new business model.

Just to be clear, I’m not necessarily blaming the EHR vendors. They’re doing what their customers are asking them to do which is their highest priority. Until their customers ask for interoperability, it’s not going to happen. And in many respects, their customers don’t want interoperability. That’s been the real problem with interoperability since the start and it’s why grand visions of interoperability are unlikely to happen. Micro interoperability, which is how I’d describe what’s happening today, will happen and is happening.

If EHR vendors really cared about being interoperable, they’d spend the time to see where interoperability would lower costs, improve care, and provide a better patient experience. That turns out to be a lot of places. Then, they’d figure out how to make that possible and still secure and safe. Instead, they don’t really do this. The EHR vendors just follow whatever industry standard is out there so they can say they’re working on interoperability. Ironically, many experts say that the industry standards aren’t standard and won’t really make a big impact on interoperability.

There are no leaders in healthcare interoperability. There are just followers of the “just enough” crowd.

Let’s just be honest about what’s really possible when it comes to EHR vendors and healthcare interoperability. There is some point to point use cases that are really valuable and happening (this feels like what FHIR is doing to me). In a large health system, we’re seeing some progress on interoperability within the organization. We’re starting to see inklings of EHR vendors opening up to third-party providers, but that still has a long ways to go. Otherwise, we’re exchanging CCDs, faxes, and lab results.

Will we see anything more beyond this from EHR vendors? I’m skeptical. Let me know what you think in the comments on on Twitter with @HealthcareScene.