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Can Providers Survive If They Don’t Get Population Health Management Right?

Posted on August 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Most providers know that they won’t succeed with population health management unless they get some traction in a few important areas — and that if not, they could face disaster as their volume of value-based payment share grows. The thing is, getting PHM right is proving to be a mindboggling problem for many.

Let’s start with some numbers which give us at least one perspective on the situation.

According to a survey by Health Leaders Media, 87% of respondents said that improving their population health management chops was very important. Though the article summarizing the study doesn’t say this explicitly, we all know that they have to get smart about PHM if they want to have a prayer of prospering under value-based reimbursement.

However, it seems that the respondents aren’t making nearly as much PHM progress as they’d like. For example, just 38% of respondents told Health Leaders that they attributed 25% or more of their organization’s net revenue to risk-based pop health management activities, a share which has fallen two percent from last year’s results.

More than half (51%) said that their top barrier to successfully deploying or expanding pop health programs was up-front funding for care management, IT and infrastructure. They also said that engaging patients in their own care (45%) and getting meaningful data into providers’ hands (33%) weren’t proving to be easy tasks.

At this point it’s time for some discussion.

Obviously, providers grapple with competing priorities every time they try something new, but the internal conflicts are especially clear in this case.

On the one hand, it takes smart care management to make value-based contracts feasible. That could call for a time-consuming and expensive redesign of workflow and processes, patient education and outreach, hiring case managers and more.

Meanwhile, no PHM effort will blossom without the right IT support, and that could mean making some substantial investments, including custom-developed or third-party PHM software, integrating systems into a central data repository, sophisticated data analytics and a whole lot more.

Putting all of this in place is a huge challenge. Usually, providers lay the groundwork for a next-gen strategy in advance, then put infrastructure, people and processes into place over time. But that’s a little tough in this case. We’re talking about a huge problem here!

I get it that vendors began offering off-the-shelf PHM systems or add-on modules years ago, that one can hire consultants to change up workflow and that new staff should be on-board and trained by now. And obviously, no one can say that the advent of value-based care snuck up on them completely unannounced. (In fact, it’s gotten more attention than virtually any other healthcare issue I’ve tracked.) Shouldn’t that have done the trick?

Well, yes and no. Yes, in that in many cases, any decently-run organization will adapt if they see a trend coming at them years in advance. No, in that the shift to value-based payment is such a big shift that it could be decades before everyone can play effectively.

When you think about it, there are few things more disruptive to an organization than changing not just how much it’s paid but when and how along with what they have to do in return. Yes, I too am sick of hearing tech startups beat that term to death, but I think it applies in a fairly material sense this time around.

As readers will probably agree, health IT can certainly do something to ease the transition to value-based care. But HIT leaders won’t get the chance if their organization underestimates the scope of the overall problem.

Investors Competing For Health IT Opportunities

Posted on June 28, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study has concluded that investors are hungry for health IT investment opportunities, in some cases battling competitors for particularly attractive companies. The report concluded that investment firms see health IT as a lower-risk way to get a cut of the healthcare market than other possible targets.

The analysis by Bain & Company, which looks at 2017 numbers, said that the number of health IT investment deals completed last year rose to 32 from 23 in 2016.

The value of disclosed deals fell from $15.5 billion in 2016 to $1.9 billion in 2017. This is not a sign of weakness in the sector, however. The 2016 deals volume was pumped up by two megadeals (acquisitions of MultiPlan and Press Ganey), which were valued collectively at $9.9 billion. Meanwhile, in 2017 only one deal exceeded $800 million.

Deal counts and volume aside, there’s no question that investors are still very interested in acquiring or taking a stake in health IT companies, Bain reports. According to its study, there are many good reasons for their excitement.

“Investors find HCIT target attractive not only because HCIT companies play a vital role in promoting technology adoption in healthcare but also because they bear less of the direct reimbursement and regulatory risk that affect other healthcare sectors,” the report says. “With a limited set of scale assets on the market and corporate buyers willing to pay premiums for those that do become available, valuations remain high and competition intense.”

The report notes that most of the health IT buyouts in 2017 involved biopharma investments, particularly among companies using IT solutions and advanced analytics to streamline development a testing of drugs. Such deals include the buyout of Certara, which offers decision support technology for optimizing drug development, and Bracket, which sells technology for managing clinical trials.

However, investors were also interested in EMR and practice management vendors. Given that just a handful of big vendors block of the market for hospital IT, they looked elsewhere.

In particular, investment firms were interested in consolidating some of the many vendors selling ambulatory care EMRs platforms supporting specialties like gastroenterology. For example, investors picked up a $230 million stake in Modernizing Medicine, which offers EMR and practice management systems for specialties such as dermatology and ophthalmology, Bain said.

In the future, investors will gain interest in revenue cycle management software. In addition to investing in or acquiring RCM tools for providers, investors may target RCM software helping patients pay their bills. For example, private equity firm Frontier Capital bought a majority stake in medical card company AccessOne last year.

Bain also predicts that Investors will pay growing attention to clinical decision support platforms, driven in part by legislation requiring doctors to use clinical decision support tools before ordering complex diagnostic imaging of Medicare patients.

In addition, investment firms are keeping their eye on population health management software vendors. It’s not clear yet which companies will dominate the sector, and how these platforms will evolve, so dealmakers are hanging back. Still, within a few years they may well begin to throw money at PHM companies.

5 Steps to Ensure Revenue Integrity After Implementing a New EHR

Posted on June 18, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

In the rush to implement EHRs for Meaningful Use incentives, many practices lost sight of what matters most for continued success—revenue integrity, says Joette Derricks, healthcare compliance and revenue integrity consultant in Baltimore, MD. Revenue integrity—the idea that practices must take proactive steps to capture and retain revenue—isn’t a novel concept. However, it’s becoming increasingly important for physician practices operating in a regulatory-driven environment, she adds.

Revenue integrity is also an important part of ensuring smooth cashflow during and after the transition to a new EHR, says Derricks. This is a time when revenue opportunities are easily overlooked as practices adjust to new navigation, templates, and more, she adds.

Revenue integrity is all about compliance, says Derricks. “It’s about taking a holistic approach to operational efficiency, regulatory compliance, and maximizing reimbursement,” she adds. “It’s about doing things the right way.”

Maximizing reimbursement isn’t about ‘gaming’ the system to upcode. Rather, it’s about implementing processes and procedures to ensure that practices are paid for all of the services they perform without leaving money on the table or generating revenue that payers will later recoup, she explains.

Derricks provides five simple steps practices can take to ensure revenue integrity following an EHR implementation:

1. Review EHR templates. Do templates include the most specific CPT and ICD-10-CM codes? And do physicians understand the importance of avoiding unspecified codes, when possible?

2. Examine the interface between the EHR and practice management system. Do the codes that physicians assign in the EHR feed correctly into the practice management system? For example, when a physician performs an E/M service in addition to a procedure, does the EHR map both codes to the practice management system for billing purposes? Does the practice management system correctly bundle and unbundle services, when appropriate?

3. Run your numbers frequently. Ideally, practices will perform a monthly data analysis to help gauge performance and identify potential missed revenue opportunities, says Derricks. For example, she suggests running a report of the practice’s top 20 billing codes in a particular month. Then, compare those codes with the top 20 codes the practice billed that same month in the previous year. What has changed, and why? And have these changes benefited or hurt the practice? For example, practices may see new codes in that list because they added chronic care or transitional care management, both of which provide additional revenue. Or practices may discover a system glitch that incorrectly bundled services that are separately payable, thus causing a revenue loss.

“Everybody can play the ‘I’m too busy’ game, but this is too important to fall into that trap,” says Derricks. “I applaud the office manager or practice administrator who recognizes the value of constantly being on the lookout for system-wide improvements and analyzing their own numbers.”

Some practice management systems provide robust billing analytics that can help practices identify the root cause of billing errors and omissions. Working with a consultant is another option, says Derricks. Consultants provide unbiased input regarding inefficiencies and vulnerabilities and can provide a ‘fresh set of eyes’ necessary to effect change. They also often have access to benchmarking tools and other resources that can help practices identify revenue gaps and delays, she adds.

For example, Derricks suggests performing an assessment for revenue gaps and roadblocks to reduce the workflow process errors that delay revenue. Download the assessment.

4. Provide physician training. Physicians need thorough training on how to use the EHR properly so as to avoid data omissions, says Derricks. They also need annual training on new CPT and ICD-10-CM codes as well as new documentation requirements, she adds.

5. Create an environment that promotes compliance. This requires a top-down approach from physicians and practice managers, says Derricks. “Everyone should have their eyes open and feel comfortable being able to address concerns,” she says. “It should be an open-door policy in terms of looking at processes versus putting your head down.”

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Stanford Survey Generates Predictable Result: Doctors Want EHR Changes

Posted on June 11, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I know you’re going to have trouble believing this, but many PCPs think EHRs need substantial changes.

Such is the unsurprising conclusion drawn by a survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Stanford Medicine. The poll, which took place between March 2 and March 27 of this year, surveyed 521 PCPs licensed to practice in the U.S. who have been using their current EHR system for at least one month.

The physicians were recruited via snail mail from the American Medical Association Masterfile. Figures for years in practice by gender, region and primary medical specialty were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population of PCPs in the U.S.

According to the survey, about two-thirds of PCPs think EHRs have generally improved care (63%). Two-thirds said they were at least somewhat satisfied with their current systems, though only 18% were very satisfied.

Meanwhile, a total of 34% were somewhat or very dissatisfied with their system, and 40% of PCPs said that EHRs create more challenges than benefits. Also, 49% of office-based PCPs reported that using an EHR detracts from their clinical effectiveness.  Forty-four percent of PCPs said that primary value of EHRs is data storage, while just 8% said that the biggest benefits were clinically-related.

To improve EHRs’ clinical value, it will take a lot of effort, with 51% saying they think EHRs need a complete overhaul.  Seventy-two percent of PCPs said that improving user interfaces could best address their needs in the immediate future.

Meanwhile, 67% of respondents said that solving interoperability problems should be the top priority for EHR development over the next decade, and 43% reported wanting improved predictive analytics capabilities.

Nearly all (99%) of PCPs said that EHR capabilities should include maintaining a high-quality record of patient data over time, followed closely by providing an intuitive user experience. Also, 88% said that providing clinical decision support at the moment of care was important, followed by identifying high-risk patients in their patient panel (86%).

When asked what EHR features they found most satisfying, they cited maintaining a high-quality patient record (73%), offering patients access to medical records (71%), sharing information with providers across the care continuum (65%) and supporting practice/revenue cycle management needs (60%).

However, EHRs still have a long way to go in offering other preferred capabilities, including changing and adapting in response to user feedback, improving patient-provider interaction, coordinating care for patients with complex conditions and engaging patients in prescribed care plans through mobile technologies. Vendors, you have been warned.

New Service Brings RCM Process To Blockchain

Posted on October 6, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Much of the discussion around blockchain (that I’ve seen, at least) focuses on blockchain’s potential as a platform for secure sharing of clinical data. For example, some HIT experts see blockchain as a near-ideal scalable platform for protecting the privacy of EHR-based patient data.

That being said, blockchain offers an even more logical platform for financial transactions, given its origins as the foundation for bitcoin transactions and its track record of supporting those transactions efficiently.

Apparently, that hasn’t been lost on the team at Change Healthcare. The Nashville-based health IT company is planning to launch what it says is the first blockchain solution for enterprise-scale use in healthcare. According to a release announcing the launch, the new technology platform should be online by the end of this year.

Change Healthcare already processes 12 billion transactions a year, worth more than $2 trillion in claims annually.  Not surprisingly, the new platform will extend its new blockchain platform to its existing payer and provider partners. Here’s an infographic explaining how Change expects processes will shift when it deploys blockchain:

Change_Healthcare_Intelligent_Healthcare_Network_Workflow_Infographic

To build out blockchain for use in RCM, Change is working with customers, as well as organizations like The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger project.

Hyperledger encompasses a range of tools set to offer new, more-standardized approaches to deploying blockchain, including Hyperledger Cello, which will offer access to on-demand “as-a-service” blockchain technology and Hyperledger Composer, a tool for building blockchain business networks and boosting the development and deployment of smart contracts.

It’s hard to tell how much impact Change’s blockchain deployment will have. Certainly, there are countless ways in which RCM can be improved, given the extent to which dollars still leak out of the system. Also, given its existing RCM network, Change has as good a chance as anyone of building out blockchain-based RCM.

Still, I’m wondering whether the new service will prove to be a long-term product deployment or an experiment (though Change would doubtless argue for the former). Not only that, given its relatively immature status and the lack of broadly-accepted standards, is it really safe for providers to rely on blockchain for something as mission-critical as cash flow?

Of course, when it comes to new technologies, somebody has to be first, and I’m certainly not suggesting that Change doesn’t know what it’s doing. I’d just like more evidence that blockchain is ready for prime time.

Hospitals Aren’t Getting Much ROI From RCM Technology

Posted on July 24, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

If your IT investments aren’t paying off, your revenue cycle management process is clunky and consumers are defaulting on their bills, you’re in a pretty rocky situation financially. Unfortunately, that’s just the position hospitals find themselves in lately, according to a new study.

The study, which was conducted by the Healthcare Financial Management Association and Navigant, surveyed 125 hospital health system chief financial officers and revenue cycle executives.

When they looked at the data, researchers saw that hospitals are being hit with a double whammy. On the one hand, the RCM systems hospitals have in place don’t seem to be cutting it, and on the other, the hospitals are struggling to collect from patients.

Nearly three out of four respondents said that their RCM technology budgets were increasing, with 32% reporting that they were increasing spending by 5% or more. Seventy-seven percent of hospitals with less than 100 beds and 78% of hospitals with 100 to 500 beds plan to increase such spending, the survey found.

The hospital leaders expect that technology investments will improve their RCM capabilities, with 79% considering business intelligence analytics, EHR-enabled workflow or reporting, revenue integrity, coding and physician/clinician documentation options.

Unfortunately, the software infrastructure underneath these apps isn’t performing as well as they’d like. Fifty-one percent of respondents said that their organizations had trouble keeping up with EHR upgrades, or weren’t getting the most out of functional, workflow and reporting improvements. Given these obstacles, which limit hospitals’ overall tech capabilities, these execs have little chance of seeing much ROI from RCM investments.

Not only that, CFOs and RCM leaders weren’t sure how much impact existing technology was having on their organizations. In fact, 41% said they didn’t have methods in place to track how effective their technology enhancements have been.

To address RCM issues, hospital leaders are looking beyond technology. Some said they were tightening up their revenue integrity process, which is designed to ensure that coding and charge capture processes work well and pricing for services is reasonable. Such programs are designed to support reliable financial reporting and efficient operations.

Forty-four percent of respondents said their organizations had established revenue integrity programs, and 22% said revenue integrity was a top RCM focus area for the coming year. Meanwhile, execs whose organizations already had revenue integrity programs in place said that the programs offered significant benefits, including increased net collections (68%), greater charge capture (61%) and reduced compliance risks (61%).

Still, even if a hospital has its RCM house in order, that’s far from the only revenue drain it’s likely to face. More than 90% of respondents think the steady increase in consumer responsibility for care will have an impact on their organizations, particularly rural hospital executives, the study found.

In effort to turn the tide, hospital financial execs are making it easier for consumers to pay their bills, with 93% of respondents offering an online payment portal and 63% rolling out cost-of-care estimation tools. But few hospitals are conducting sophisticated collections initiatives. Only 14% of respondents said they were using advanced modeling tools for predicting propensity to pay, researchers said.

Providers Work To Increase Patient Payments By Improving RCM Operations

Posted on June 29, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A growing body of research on healthcare payment trends is underscoring a painful fact: that consumers are footing a steadily growing share of their medical bills, and sometimes failing to pay. In response, providers are upgrading their revenue cycle management systems and tightening up their collections processes.

A new analysis by payment services vendor InstaMed has concluded that consumer spending on healthcare services should grow to $608 billion by 2019. This is a fairly substantial number even given the high volume of U.S. healthcare spending, which hit $3.4 trillion in 2016.

The growth in patient spending has been fueled by the emergence of high-deductible health plans, which are saddling consumers with increasingly large financial obligations. According to CMS figures cited in the report, the average deductible for covered workers with single coverage has doubled over the past several years, from $735 in 2010 to $1.487 in 2016.

But despite the increasing importance of consumers as healthcare payers, providers don’t seem to be doing enough to inform them about costs. More than 90% of consumers would like to know what the payment responsibility is prior to a provider visit, but they often don’t find out what they owe until they get a bill. What makes things worse is that very few consumers (7%) even know what a deductible, co-insurance and out-of-pocket maximum are, so they’re ill-prepared to understand bills when they receive them, studies have found.

Providers are waiting longer to collect what they are owed by patients, with three-quarters waiting a month or longer to collect outstanding balances from patients. And problems with collecting patient accounts are getting worse over time.  In fact, a new study from TransUnion Healthcare found that about 68% of patients with bills of $500 or less didn’t pay off the full balance during 2016, up from 49% in 2014.

Meanwhile, patient financial responsibility for care has risen from 10% to 30% of costs over the last few years, with more increases likely. This has led to expanding levels of consumer bad debt for medical expenses.

In attempt to cope with these issues, providers are buying new revenue cycle management systems. A survey released last year by Black Book Research, which included 5,000 management and user-level RCM clients, found that many healthcare organizations are rethinking RCM technology and demanding better performance.

Forty-eight percent of responding CFOs told Black Book that they weren’t sure they had the budget they needed to upgrade to an end-to-end RCM system this year.  Nonetheless, 93% of CFOs said they planned to eliminate RCM vendors, financial and coding technology firms, that are not producing a return on investment, up from 79% with similar plans in Q4 2015.

In addition to investing in newer RCM technology, providers are making it easier for patients to pay via whatever medium they choose. Not only are providers issuing bill reminders via text, and accepting payments online and by phone, they’re also adding new channels like PayPal payments, bank transfers and mobile payments.

Healthcare CIOs Focus On Optimizing EMRs

Posted on March 30, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Few technical managers struggle with more competing priorities than healthcare CIOs. But according to a recent survey, they’re pretty clear what they have to accomplish over the next few years, and optimizing EMRs has leapt to the top of the to-do list.

The survey, which was conducted by consulting firm KPMG in collaboration with CHIME, found that 38 percent of CHIME members surveyed saw EMR optimization as their #1 priority for capital investment over the next three years.  To gather results, KPMG surveyed 122 CHIME members about their IT investment plans.

In addition to EMR optimization, top investment priorities identified by the respondents included accountable care/population health technology (21 percent), consumer/clinical and operational analytics (16 percent), virtual/telehealth technology enhancements (13 percent), revenue cycle systems/replacement (7 percent) and ERP systems/replacement (6 percent).

Meanwhile, respondents said that improving business and clinical processes was their biggest challenge, followed by improving operating efficiency and providing business intelligence and analytics.

It looks like at least some of the CIOs might have the money to invest, as well. Thirty-six percent said they expected to see an increase in their operating budget over the next two years, and 18 percent of respondents reported that they expect higher spending over the next 12 months. On the other hand, 63 percent of respondents said that spending was likely to be flat over the next 12 months and 44 percent over the next two years. So we have to assume that they’ll have a harder time meeting their goals.

When it came to infrastructure, about one-quarter of respondents said that their organizations were implementing or investing in cloud computing-related technology, including servers, storage and data centers, while 18 percent were spending on ERP solutions. In addition, 10 percent of respondents planned to implement cloud-based EMRs, 10 percent enterprise systems, and 8 percent disaster recovery.

The respondents cited data loss/privacy, poorly-optimized applications and integration with existing architecture as their biggest challenges and concerns when it came to leveraging the cloud.

What’s interesting about this data is that none of the respondents mentioned improved security as a priority for their organization, despite the many vulnerabilities healthcare organizations have faced in recent times.  Their responses are especially curious given that a survey published only a few months ago put security at the top of CIOs’ list of business goals for near future.

The study, which was sponsored by clinical communications vendor Spok, surveyed more than 100 CIOs who were CHIME members  — in other words, the same population the KPMG research tapped. The survey found that 81 percent of respondents named strengthening data security as their top business goal for the next 18 months.

Of course, people tend to respond to surveys in the manner prescribed by the questions, and the Spok questions were presumably worded differently than the KPMG questions. Nonetheless, it’s surprising to me that data security concerns didn’t emerge in the KPMG research. Bottom line, if CIOs aren’t thinking about security alongside their other priorities, it could be a problem.

HIMSS17: Health IT Staff, Budgets Growing

Posted on March 1, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new study announced last week at the HIMSS17 event concludes that demand for health IT staff continues to grow as employers expand their budgets. Not surprisingly, given this growth, the healthcare employers are having trouble recruiting enough IT staffers to meet their growing needs.

Results from the HIMSS Leadership and Workforce Survey reflect responses from 368 U.S. health IT leaders made between November 2016 and early January 2017. Fifty-six of respondents from vendors and consulting firms were in executive management, as compared with 41% of providers.

The survey concluded that the majority of health IT respondents have positions they’d like to fill, including 61% of health IT vendors/consultants and 43% of providers who responded. Only 32% of vendor/consultant organizations and 38% or providers said they were fully staffed, HIMSS said. We’ve seen this challenge from many of the healthcare IT companies which post their jobs on Healthcare IT Central.

Demand for IT recruits grew last year, as well. Researchers found that 61% of vendors/consultants responding and 42% of providers responding saw IT staffing increases over the past year, and that the majority of respondents in both groups expect to increase their IT staffing levels or at least hold them steady next year.

Of course, someone has to pay for these new team members. HIMSS researchers found that IT budgets were continuing to rise over time. Roughly nine out of ten vendors/consultants and 56% of providers said they expected to see increases in their IT budgets this year.

As often happens, however, vendors and consultants and providers seem to have different HIT priorities. While vendors seem to be addressing new technology issues, providers are still focused on how to manage their existing EMR infrastructure investments, HIMSS said.

That being said, the survey found, health IT stakeholders have many overlapping concerns, including privacy and security, population health, care coordination and improving the culture of care.

One of the key insights from this study – that vendors/consultants and providers have different views on the importance of enhancing existing EMRs – is borne out by another study released at the HIMSS event.

The study, which was backed by voice recognition software vendor Nuance Communications, found that providers are broadly interested in implementing new technologies that enhance their EMR, especially computer-assisted physician documentation, mobility and speech recognition tools.

However, when asked to be specific about which tools interested them, they were less enthusiastic, with 44% showing an interest in mobility tools, 38% computer-assisted physician documentation and 25% speech recognition. Documentation tools that enhanced existing functions were especially popular, with 54% of respondents expecting to see them support a reduction in denied claims, 52% improved performance under bundled payments, 38% reduced readmissions and 38% better physician time management which improves patient flow.

This survey also found that the most popular strategy for enhancing physician satisfaction with health IT tools was providing clinician training and education (chosen by 82%). Since their EMR is probably their biggest IT investment, my guess is that the training will focus there. And that suggests that EMRs are still the center of their universe, doesn’t it?

Value Based Reimbursement Research Results in Time for #AHIPInstitute

Posted on June 15, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

McKesson Health Solutions has commissioned a new National Research study on Value Based Reimbursement. Here’s a quick summary of some of the findings:

The rapid pace of change in healthcare payment continues unabated, with payers reporting they are 58% along the continuum towards full value-based reimbursement, a 10% leap since 2014. Hospitals aren’t far behind, reporting they’re now 50% along the value continuum, up 4% in the past two years.

Those numbers were a bit shocking to me. It doesn’t feel like we’ve gotten that far in the shift to value based reimbursement. Does it feel like it to you? I knew we were headed that direction, but definitely thought we had just begun. These numbers paint a much different story.

This week I’m excited to attend my first AHIP Institute. I’ll be exploring this shift in all its gory details.

Along with this study and with AHIP starting tomorrow, McKesson has been sharing a number of cartoons about the healthcare industry. Here are a few of them they tweeted out:

Healthcare Costs

Healthcare Payment Pathway