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Small Grounds for Celebration and Many Lurking Risks in HIMSS Survey

Posted on March 12, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

When trying to bypass the breathless enthusiasm of press releases and determine where health IT is really headed, we can benefit from a recent HIMMS survey, released around the time of their main annual conference. They managed to get responses from 224 managers of health care facilities–which range from hospitals and clinics to nursing homes–and 145 high-tech developers that fall into the large categories of “vendors” and “consultants.” What we learn is that vendors are preparing for major advances in health IT, but that clinicians are less ready for them.

On the positive side, both the clinicians and the vendors assign fairly high priority to data analytics and to human factors and design (page 7). In fact, data analytics have come to be much more appreciated by clinicians in the past year (page 9). This may reflect the astonishing successes of deep learning artificial intelligence reported recently in the general press, and herald a willingness to invest in these technologies to improve health care. As for human factors and design, the importance of these disciplines has been repeatedly shown in HxRefactored conferences.

Genomics ranks fairly low for both sides, which I think is reasonable given that there are still relatively few insights we can gain from genetics to change our treatments. Numerous studies have turned up disappointing results: genetic testing doesn’t work very well yet, and tends to lead only to temporary improvements. In fact, both clinicians and vendors show a big drop in interest in precision medicine and genetics (pages 9 and 10). The drop in precision medicine, in particular, may be related to the strong association the term has with Vice President Joe Biden in the previous administration, although NIH seems to still be committed to it. Everybody knows that these research efforts will sprout big payoffs someday–but probably not soon enough for the business models of most companies.

But much more of the HIMSS report is given over to disturbing perception gaps between the clinicians and vendors. For instance, clinicians hold patient safety in higher regard than vendors (page 7). I view this concern cynically. Privacy and safety have often been invoked to hold back data exchange. I cannot believe that vendors in the health care space treat patient safety or privacy carelessly. I think it more likely that clinicians are using it as a shield to hide their refusal to try valuable new technologies.

In turn, vendors are much more interested in data exchange and integration than clinicians (page 7). This may just reflect a different level of appreciation for the effects of technology on outcomes. That is, data exchange and integration may be complex and abstract concepts, so perhaps the vendors are in a better position to understand that it ultimately determines whether a patient gets the treatment her condition demands. But really, how difficult can it be to be to understand data exchange? It seems like the clinicians are undermining the path to better care through coordination.

I have trouble explaining the big drops in interest in care coordination and public health (pages 9 and 10), which is worrisome because these things will probably do more than anything to produce healthier populations. The problem, I think, is probably that there’s no reimbursement for taking on these big, hairy problems. HIMMS explains the drop as a shift of attention to data analytics, which should ultimately help achieve the broader goals (page 11).

HIMSS found that clinicians expect to decrease their investments in health IT over the upcoming year, or at least to keep the amount steady (page 14). I suspect this is because they realize they’ve been soaked by suppliers and vendors. Since Meaningful Use was instituted in 2009, clinicians have poured billions of dollars and countless staff time into new EHRs, reaping mostly revenue-threatening costs and physician burn-out. However, as HIMSS points out, vendors expect clinicians to increase their investments in health IT–and may be sorely disappointed, especially as they enter a robust hiring phase (page 15).

Reading the report, I come away feeling that the future of health care may be bright–but that the glow you see comes from far over the horizon.

New Study Suggests That HIEs Deliver Value by Aggregating Patient Data

Posted on March 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Historically, I’ve been pretty skeptical about the benefits that HIEs offer, not because the concept was flawed, but that the execution was uncertain. Toss in the fact that few have figured out how to be self-supporting financially, and you have a very shaky business model on your hands. But maybe, at long last, we’re discovering better uses for the vast amount of data HIEs have been trading.

New research by one exchange suggests that some of the key value they offer is aggregating patient data from multiple providers into a longitudinal view of patients. The research, completed by the Kansas Health Information Network and Diameter Health suggests that the Qualified Clinical Data Registries promoted by MACRA/QPP could be a winning approach.

To conduct the research, the partners extracted data from the KHIN exchange on primary care practices in which more than 50,000 patients visited toward 214 care sites in 2016 and 2017. This is certainly interesting, as most of the multi-site studies I’ve seen on this scale are done within a single provider’s network. It’s also notable that the data is relatively fresh, rather than relying on, say, Medicare data which is often several years older.

According to KHIN, using interoperable interfaces to providers and collecting near real-time clinical data makes prompt quality measure calculation possible. According to KHIN executive director Laura McCrary, Ed.D., this marks a significant change from current methods. “This [approach is in stark contrast to the current model which computes quality measures from only the data in the provider’s EHR,” she notes.

FWIW, the two research partners will be delivering a presentation on the research study at the HIMSS18 conference on Friday, March 9, from 12 to 1 PM. I’m betting it will offer some interesting insights.

But even if you can’t make it to this presentation, it’s still worth noting that it emphasizes the increasing importance of the longitudinal patient record. Eventually, under value-based care, it will become critical to have access not only to a single provider’s EHR data, but rather a fuller data set which also includes connected health/wearables data, data from payer claims, overarching population health data and more. And obviously, HIEs play a major role in making this happen.

Like other pundits, I’d go so far to say that without developing this kind of robust longitudinal patient record, which includes virtually every source of relevant patient data, health systems and providers won’t be able to manage patients well enough to meet their individual patient or population health goals.

If HIEs can help us get there, more power to them.

Talking Genomic Medicine at #CES2016

Posted on January 19, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was lucky to moderate a panel at the Digital Health Summit at CES 2016. The session was called “Look Who’s Talking: Newborn Genomic Data Enables Precision Medicine” and I was joined by 2 amazing panelists:

  • Andy De, Global Managing Director and General Manager for Healthcare and Life Sciences at Tableau
  • Aaron Black, Director, Informatics, Inova Translational Medicine Institute

It’s amazing to see the work Andy and Aaron are doing with genomic medicine. It’s truly uncharted territory and we’re still discovering what’s going to be possible. However, I think we do a good job looking at some of the things that are reality today in genomic medicine.

Check out all of the healthcare IT conferences we attend throughout the year.

Great Interview with Jonathan Bush

Posted on May 29, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Jonathan Bush is the very best interview in healthcare IT. A few years back, Neil Versel grabbed Jonathan Bush at his athenahealth cloud party at HIMSS for an interview. It’s now become quite a tradition. They talk a lot about CommonWell, the impact of Medicare penalties, and much more. Here’s this year’s interview of Jonathan Bush at HIMSS by Neil Versel:

P.S. Yes, HIMSS was forever ago and I’m just catching up on stuff now.

What Is Population Health?

Posted on March 24, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This is a really important question that I think healthcare leaders across the country and even the world are trying to figure out. This video does a pretty good job of explaining the current state of population health.

We’d love to hear your thoughts and comments on population health as it stands today and where it’s headed in the comments.