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Why I Didn’t Choose Your Healthcare Organization

Posted on April 12, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Chelsea Kimbrough from Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Chelsea Kimbrough

I recently had a bad healthcare experience. I received functional care, but I wasn’t cared for. As in, I’m fairly certain my doctor didn’t know my name when she walked into the room or when she left it. To her, I was another patient in a crowded schedule. To me, it was a rushed, impersonal experience that left me with absolutely no desire to trust my wellbeing in her hands.

As someone who is familiar with the healthcare space, I’m the first to admit that finding a new provider is hard work – and finding one that meets each of your communication expectations is even harder. But after that appointment, I was more than up for the challenge.

It’s important to note that I’m a proud millennial who is accustomed to the service and support provided in other industries. When I wanted to make a dinner reservation last night, I did it via a mobile app. When I needed a great blazer to wear to a conference, I requested one in my clothes subscription box. I am an all-access-at-all-hours type of person. So when it came time to schedule an appointment, I turned to the place where I, the consumer, felt I had the most power: the internet.

But first, I needed to find a new doctor. I leveraged a process that went something like this:

  1. I opened multiple review-focused sites.
  2. I searched for what I needed (i.e. ‘family practitioner within 10 miles of my zip code’).
  3. I filtered results to ensure my search only displayed doctors with the rating and characteristics I prefer.
  4. I began the tedious process of cross referencing their profiles on different sites.
  5. When I thought I found a keeper, I scoured their organization’s website for more information.
  6. And then, I dug into any information I could find online to learn more about the doctor.

This process eliminated doctors who had poor reviews, who lacked information available online, and who had questionable posts on social media. (Seriously, everything is available online these days – and digitally-savvy patients like me will find it.)

In the end, I narrowed my search to a handful of local, highly-rated doctors and organizations. But what I was searching for wasn’t just someone with a great online rating and an office close to my front door, I was looking for someone who:

  • Communicates information quickly via text message
  • Calls patients to communicate more important messages
  • Offers online scheduling that doesn’t require a formal login
  • Keeps average wait times down
  • Creates genuine connections with their patients

In short, I wanted to find an organization that provides exceptional in-person care, prompt telephone support, and convenient technology-based tools. Anyone who seemed lacking was unceremoniously crossed off my ‘potential new doctor’ list.  And I’m not the only one who goes to these lengths: in today’s digitally-empowered world, there are more healthcare consumers than ever flexing their online search superpowers before entrusting their care to any healthcare professional.

Unfortunately, the process isn’t perfect. Bad experiences happen, and when they do, patients like me may choose to look elsewhere for care. On the other hand, when we find a healthcare organization that does provide all of the above, we receive a more seamless, enjoyable experience. And when met with a better experience, we are less likely to choose a different provider, facility, or organization to provide future care.

Want to learn more about consumer-minded patients’ healthcare journeys? Check out our patient journey infographic here!

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality telephone answering, appointment scheduling, and automated communication services. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services. Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

The Human Side of Healthcare Interactions

Posted on March 19, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Bennight, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

The week after HIMSS is certainly a rest and reflect (and catch up) time period. So much information is crammed into five short days that hopefully fuel innovation and change in our industry for the next year. We hear a lot of buzzwords during HIMSS, and as marketers in general. This year my biggest area of post-HIMSS reflection is on the human side of healthcare. Often, as health IT professionals, we can be so enamored with the techie side of things that we lose sight of what adding more automation does to our daily interactions.

The digital revolution has certainly made life easier. We can connect online, schedule an appointment, Uber to our destination, order groceries online, and pick them up on our way home with limited interactions with any real human. While the convenience for many far outweighs any downside, the digital world is causing its own health concern: loneliness.

Research by Holt-Lunstad found that “weak social connections carry a health risk that is more harmful than not exercising, twice as harmful as obesity, and is comparable to smoking 15 cigarettes a day or being an alcoholic.” But the digitization of our lives is reducing the amount of human interaction and our reasons to connect in real life. I keep hearing the phrase “we are more connected than ever, but we are feeling more alone”.  How do we avoid feeding another health issue, such as depression, while making healthcare more accessible, cost-effective, and convenient?

In healthcare communications, I want both technological convenience and warm, caring human interaction depending on what my need is at a given moment. If I need to schedule an appointment, I’d better have the option to schedule online. But in the middle of the night, when my child has a 104F fever and I call my doctor, I want a real person to talk and ask questions to, who will listen to the state my child is in and make the best recommendation for their health.

I had the privilege of discussing this balance of human and tech in a meet up at HIMSS last week. We learned that my colleague and friend learned the gender of her baby via a portal while waiting patiently for the doctor’s office to call. This is pushing the line of being ok in my opinion. But what if it was something worse, such as a cancer diagnosis or something equally scary? Is that ok for you? Wouldn’t you prefer and need someone to guide you through the result and talk about next steps?

As we add even more channels to communicate between health facility and patient, we need to take a look at the patient interaction lifecycle and personalize it to their needs. We should address the areas where automation might move faster than the human connections we initiate to ensure we are always in step with our tools and technology. Healthcare relationships rely on confidence and loyalty, and these things aren’t so easily built into an app. Online interactions will never replace the human, day-to-day banter and touch we all need. But I believe that technology can create efficiency that allows my doctor to spend more quality time with me during my visits and better engage me in my health.

So the question stands: how do you think the healthcare industry can find the right tech and human balance?

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Predicting the Top Patient Engagement Themes of #HIMSS18

Posted on February 12, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Brittany Quemby, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Brittany Quemby - StericycleWe all have different motivations in life – and when it comes to your health, it is no different. Motivation strikes us all differently, especially regarding eating well, exercising, maintaining good health, and engaging in our healthcare.  Have you ever thought about what motivates you when it comes to your healthcare?

For instance, I love carbs. So, my motivation for exercising is the reward of being able to eat pizza and pasta without feeling guilty. When it comes to my relationship with my provider, I want to be able to conveniently schedule an appointment without waiting on hold for over an hour. With this in mind, I’ve been thinking about some of the ways the industry is starting to close communication gaps in an effort to improve patient experiences, and how these trends will influence focus at the HIMSS18 conference in Las Vegas.

Below are some of the themes to keep a look for at HIMSS18 that are driving more strategic engagement amongst patients and providers.

Convenience

As consumers, we drive trends and change in the market. As patients, we do something similar in the healthcare market: drive our healthcare experiences.  Consumers and patients alike want convenience and quality and will choose care providers accordingly.

Take those aged 18 to 34, or millennials, as an example. They are now the largest generation in the U.S. labor force right, surpassing Gen Xers according to U.S. Census Bureau data by Pew Research.  Convenience for this generation is a top motivator. Millennials, for example, find it inconvenient to see their physician and find scheduling preventative visits and booking appointments to be a chore. A survey from Salesforce and Harris Poll showed that 71 percent of millennials want to be able to book appointments through mobile apps.

And I think I can speak for the rest of us by saying that convenience is at the top of list for everyone else. According to Accenture, 64 percent of all patients will book appointments digitally by 2019. Tapping into the convenience card is essential for establishing lasting engagement with patients while delivering an optimal user experience.

Access

It’s time to say goodbye to 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. support. Unfortunately for Dolly, these days it is no way to make a livin’. Consumers have grown accustomed to instant gratification and are looking for constant accessibility. In fact, a recent EMC report found that patients want faster access to services. The report found that a whopping 45 percent wanted 24/7 access and connectivity and 42 percent wanted access on more devices.

For most, patients’ craving more access shouldn’t be a surprise. Whether it’s through portals, apps, phone, email, chat, or text – we want it! Patients have become much more comfortable with new technology and are constantly seeking new tools that make accessing and engaging with our providers easy.

Personalization

You know that feeling when the barista calls out your name when your coffee is ready? You strut up to the counter, grab the cup with your name on it, and enjoy the hot brew that was made especially for you. The same sentiment can be created in the healthcare space, and can lead to enticing results. Personalized patient engagement correlates with better care outcomes. The more involved and invested a patient is and feels with his or her healthcare, the greater the likelihood for successful outcomes.

An EMC report showed that 47 percent of patients want “personalized” experiences. The key for healthcare providers is the same as the barista: know your customer. Not all patients are the same, and treating them as such deters them from taking part in their health. Utilizing data and preferences, healthcare organizations can tailor interactions with patients, including what doctor a patient prefers, their health history, how they like to communicate, and potential other health issues, allowing treatment options to become easy, delightful, and accessible.

Conclusion

As the industry goes forward to improve upon strategic patient experience improvement, research from PwC suggests that the solution is systemic: 73 percent of provider executives say balancing patient satisfaction and employee job satisfaction is a barrier to efforts to improve the patient experience. But with the right technology-based tools and human support, this barrier can be lifted, helping eliminate employee hardships and improve the patient experience by delivering on each of the above trends.

If you’re going to be at HIMSS18, come and stop by the Stericycle Communications Solutions booth #859 to share your ideas and perspectives on patient engagement.

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality live agent services, scheduling solutions, and automated messaging solutions.  Stericycle Communication Solutions provides unified human & tech-enabled communication solutions for optimized patient experiences.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

UPMC Sells Oncology Analytics Firm To Elsevier

Posted on January 22, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Using analytics tools to improve cancer treatment can be very hard. That struggle is exemplified by the problems faced by IBM Watson Health, which dove into the oncology analytics field a few years ago but made virtually no progress in improving cancer treatment.

With any luck, however, Via Oncology will be more successful at moving the needle in cancer care. The company, which offers decision support for cancer treatment and best practices in cancer care management, was just acquired by information analytics firm Elsevier, which plans to leverage the company’s technology to support its healthcare business.

Elsevier’s Clinical Solutions group works to improve patient outcomes, reduce clinical errors and optimize cost and reimbursements for providers. Via Oncology, a former subsidiary of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, develops and implements clinical pathways for cancer care. Via Oncology spent more than 15 years as part of UPMC prior to the acquisition.

Via Oncology’s Via Pathways tool relies on evidence-based content to create clinical algorithms covering 95% of cancer types treated in the US. The content was developed by oncologists. In addition to serving as a basis for algorithm development, Via Oncology also shares the content with physicians and their staff through its Via Portal, a decision support tool which integrates with provider EMRs.

According to Elsevier, Via Pathways addresses more than 2,000 unique patient presentations which can be addressed by clinical algorithms and recommendations for all major aspects of cancer care. The system can also offer nurse triage and symptom tracking, cost information analytics, quality reporting and medical home tools for cancer centers.

According to the prepared statement issued by Elsevier, UPMC will continue to be a Via Oncology customer, which makes it clear that the healthcare giant wasn’t dumping its subsidiary or selling it for a fire sale price.

That’s probably because in addition to UPMC, more than 1,500 oncology providers and community, hospital and academic settings hold Via Pathways licenses. What makes this model particularly neat is that these cancer centers are working collaboratively to improve the product as they use it. Too few specialty treatment professionals work together this effectively, so it’s good to see Via Oncology leveraging user knowledge this way.

While most of this seems clear, I was left with the question of what role, if any, genomics plays in Via Oncology’s strategy. While it may be working with such technologies behind the scenes, the company didn’t mention any such initiatives in its publicly-available information.

This approach seems to fly in the face of existing trends and in particular, physician expectations. For example, a recent survey of oncologists by medical publication Medscape found that 71% of respondents felt genomic testing was either very important or extremely important to their field.

However, Via Oncology may have something up its sleeve and is waiting for it to be mature before it dives into the genomics pool. We’ll just have to see what it does as part of Elsevier.

Are there other areas beyond cancer where a similar approach could be taken?

Make The Busy Patient’s Living Room Their Waiting Room

Posted on December 14, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Chelsea Kimbrough from Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Chelsea Kimbrough

Patients are busier than ever before. Between the hours of eight to five, a majority have only limited availability to reach out to their healthcare providers. And after the day’s work is done, other responsibilities – such as their children’s after-school activities or errands – reign supreme. Providing easy-access avenues to securing care is the key to acquiring these patients’ loyalty.

In many ways, I’m the busy patient described above. And when I recently came down with a stubborn cough and began looking for an urgent care that could quickly see me, I experienced what I already knew: many healthcare organizations are unequipped to provide care that caters to digitally-minded patients. There were three key problems with my experience.

Problem: Limited Information Available Online
When initially searching for a local urgent care, I struggled to learn more about what a typical experience looked like at various locations. As a first time, admittedly nervous urgent care patient, I wanted to make an informed decision about where to receive care. However, I found that many websites did not offer the insight I sought. Without more information to go off of, I made my decision based on the health system’s good reputation.

Solution: Beef Up Your Web Presence
Ensuring your website has information for all patient types – especially those who may be less familiar with what your unique experience may include – will provide greater peace of mind, set accurate expectations, and enhance patient satisfaction.

Problem: Inability to Reserve Estimated Treatment Time Online
For many, leaving work to sit in a waiting room isn’t a viable option. And without an easy way to reserve an estimated treatment time or insight regarding how long the wait time may be, making time to seek valuable care can be a challenging task. While I was able to leave work early and spend the afternoon at my chosen urgent care, many others don’t have the same flexibility in their positions.

Solution: Introduce Urgent Care Digital Check-In
Enabling patients to reserve their place in line from wherever they may be creates a more seamless patient experience, enhances their sense of access, and creates greater operational efficiency within your facility.

Problem: Forced to Wait in Waiting Room
Though I was lucky be able to leave work early and wait for care at the facility, I would have much rather waited at home. Unfortunately, the urgent care only allowed patients to wait to be seen from within the waiting room with little way of entertainment; leaving would forfeit the patient’s place in the queue. As someone who has been spoiled with this capability across numerous restaurant, veterinary, and mechanic experiences, I was disappointed to find this feature wasn’t readily provided by the healthcare facility.

Solution: Automatically Notify Patients When It’s Time to Be Seen
More patients than ever have access to convenient communication tools. By digitizing your check-in process, you can enable patients to wait from the comfort of their home and notify them when it’s nearly time to be seen via an automated text message or voice call.

In all, my urgent care experience took over two hours. Had the facility provided access to more information regarding what my experience could include, the ability to reserve an estimated treatment time online, and a convenient reminder when my time to be seen neared, I could have saved over an hour spent sitting in the waiting room. If I had access to these capabilities, I could have spent this time completing important work tasks while relaxing (and keeping my germs) at home.

To learn more about how busy, consumer-minded patients are driving the need for omnichannel experiences in the healthcare industry, check out our recent e-book, OmniWhat?!

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality telephone answering, appointment scheduling, and automated communication services. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services. Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

MACRA/MIPS: Chutes & Ladders 2.0 – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 14, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/17 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jim Tate (@jimtate) from EMR Advocate and MIPS Consulting on the topic of “MACRA/MIPS: Chutes & Ladders 2.0.”

As Meaningful Use fades into the sunset we witness the arrival of the MACRA/MIPS program. The most significant change in Medicare Part B reimbursement in a generation has arrived. Fueled by the shift to “pay for value”, this zero-sum legislation guarantees there will be winners and losers. I am reminded of the childhood board game, Chutes & Ladders, where you were either climbing up or sliding down.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: Is MACRA/MIPS fair to providers? #hitsm

T2: How prepared are Eligible Clinicians for MACRA/MIPS? #hitsm

T3: What are the potential impacts of the MIPS Composite Performance Scores being made public? #hitsm

T4: Part B drugs will be included in MIPS eligibility and reimbursement calculations. What are the possible consequences? #hitsm

T5: Will MACRA/MIPS deliver better care at a lower cost? #hitsm

Bonus: If you had the power to change anything, what would you change with MACRA/MIPS? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!
Show some gratitude on Thanksgiving by thanking someone in the #HITsm community!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – TBD
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Communication Strategies Must Include Caregivers, Too

Posted on November 9, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Chelsea Kimbrough from Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Chelsea KimbroughMillions of healthcare-centric communications occur every day between providers, doctors, professionals, patients, and caregivers. These communications are often focused on the patient. This is a great thing, as the patient is the individual in need of care. Frequently, however, communication strategies are developed to meet patients’ needs and don’t truly consider how to best engage caregivers.

At one point or another, most of us will act as a caregiver for a child, spouse, or parent. We may even be responsible for coordinating multiple patient journeys at once. And should that responsibility come, we’ll likely find the best experiences with healthcare organizations that not only provide excellent patient care, but convenient communications.

According to the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP, 48 percent of caregivers are 18 to 49-years-old. And as this population ages and more young individuals step into the caregiver role, more caregivers will have been raised in homes with Internet access, smartphones, and more. In order to create caregiver-friendly experiences, healthcare organizations should ensure their communication strategies are mobile-optimized, technology-driven, and readily accessible.

Already, caregivers are seeking out ways to simplify communications with healthcare organizations. Instead of making a telephone call to schedule an appointment, many are opting to schedule appointments on behalf of patients online. By providing an easy-to-use online scheduling platform, healthcare organizations can not only ensure busy caregivers can quickly secure an appointment, they can help drive new patient acquisition.

Likewise, appointment reminders – especially those delivered via text message, which are read in the first three minutes by 90 percent of recipients – can be incredibly beneficial for both patients and healthcare organizations. By sending out a strategically timed reminder in a way caregivers are sure to see, healthcare organizations can decrease no-show rates. Here at Stericycle Communication Solutions, we’ve seen no-show rates drop by as much as 80 percent once our appointment reminder solution was implemented – a figure that impacted both the organization’s population and financial health.

A few other ways healthcare organizations can ensure they are ready to meet caregivers’ evolving needs include:

  • Implementing a website that is mobile-friendly and up-to-date
  • Communicating the same information no matter the tool, technology, department, or professional someone may interact with
  • Ensuring the entities listed above have access to the information they need to provide consistent, reliable experiences
  • Answering all phone calls with a live, friendly voice prepared to meet their every need

Caregivers and patients alike want predictable and repeatable experiences no matter the communication channel they choose to interact with. Dubbed “omnichannel” experiences across commercial sectors, healthcare organizations should implement communication strategies and infrastructure that can keep pace with evolving technology and communication preferences. Healthcare organizations that are readily able to introduce new communication channels will be best positioned to secure loyalty and success.

To learn more about how consumer-minded patients are driving the need for omnichannel experiences in the healthcare industry, check out our recent e-book, OmniWhat?!

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality telephone answering, appointment scheduling, and automated communication services. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services. Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Medical Data Impact to Financial Health, Disability and Job Protection – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on November 7, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/10 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Kimberly George (@kimberlyanngeo) from @sedgwick on the topic of “Medical Data Impact to Financial Health, Disability and Job Protection.”

Short term disability, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and similar leave of absence programs – including workers’ compensation – are designed to ensure the employment and income of the American worker is protected at a time of illness or injury. Regardless as to whether an employee is seeking wage reimbursement, a leave of absence, or a job accommodation, sufficient, accurate and timely medical documentation is required.

But what happens when accurate medical documentation is not received? Is incomplete? Or not received on a timely basis? The request for benefits is placed in a pending or denied status, wages are not paid or significantly delayed, and challenges mount for the patient.

While the burden to submit medical records, and supporting documentation falls to the patient, there is an uptick in payer and employer interest to help solve for the challenges of obtaining sufficient medical information on a timely basis. Medical documentation often requires diagnosis, subjective and objective medical information, including an assessment of functionality pertinent to the patient’s physical capabilities. This functional assessment is often defined by the benefit plan, law, and the employer’s policy.

Receipt of medical information on a timely basis is a major factor in the denial of disability benefits for people seeking support for a disability, leave of absence or workers compensation claim. Number one reason for a reversal of the denial is late receipt of the medical documentation.

The objective of this chat is for #HITsm community to share their insight, ideas and opinions about the identification, collection, and sharing of a patient’s medical and functional status with proper release of information to the payer directly. Quite simply, how can technology, process, policy and people speed up the process so patients and payers have the medical records needed to make accurate, timely and fair benefit decisions?

Reference Materials:

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What issues, obstacles and/or missing capabilities prevent or hinder an individual’s ability to collect their medical records? #HITsm

T2: How are patients impacted when benefit approval requires medical documentation and medical records are not available? #HITsm

T3: How can patients, support networks, employers, government or others support the capture, storage & retrieval of medical records? #HITsm

T4: What technologies and/or new approaches can assist w/ capture, storage & retrieval of medical record data? #HITsm

T5: What reasonable policy and/or regulatory changes could be implemented to accelerate & expedite benefit processing on behalf of consumers? #HITsm

Bonus: What stakeholders, resources, & companies should be engaged to assist w/ building & delivering a medical records collection solution? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/17 – MACRA/MIPS: Chutes & Ladders 2.0
Hosted by Jim Tate (@jimtate) from EMR Advocate and MIPS Consulting.

11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – TBD
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Second Opinions and Dr. Google – Fun Friday

Posted on November 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I have a feeling that this cartoon might rub some people the wrong way. Although, on Fun Friday’s I’m never one to not share something as funny as this.

The key discussion point in this cartoon is doctors’ frustration with patients who are already “self-diagnosed.” Rational people know that there’s a need for balance and respect, but not everyone is rational. Patients should respect the doctor and collaborate with them in their diagnosis process. If patients aren’t careful it’s easy to see how it can go too far and show a lack of respect to the doctor. That said….

It’s also easy to see how doctors can be disrespectful to patients. In today’s #HITsm chat, Erin Gilmer commented that patients wanted to be treated as equals. I suggested that “equals” wasn’t the right term since they weren’t equals. Doctors know some things that patients don’t know and patients know some things that doctors don’t know.

Erin then suggested the term “respected” which is what I used above and I think is a great term to describe how the doctor-patient interaction should be. They should equally respect each other. If that were the case, the above cartoon wouldn’t be so funny.

Patient Burnout – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 31, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 11/3 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Erin Gilmer (@GilmerHealthLaw) on the topic of “Patient Burnout.”

“We talk a lot about physician burnout. When do we talk about patient burnout?”

A few weeks ago I tweeted this out and it seems to have struck a nerve. Patient (and caregiver) burnout is a topic that is not addressed nearly enough outside of patient communities. However, burnout needs to be recognized and acknowledged in order to understand the patient experience and to create new solutions to improve health.

Patients are tasked with a lot to maintain and improve their health – things like scheduling appointments, dealing with insurance, managing multiple medications at the pharmacy, preparing for and going to appointments, communicating with healthcare providers, coordinating care between providers, and following care plans at home. All of this is in addition to their everyday lives – including family, work, social lives, and more – and dealing with sometimes very disabling conditions or while in great pain.

Providers who recognize this burnout may be able to understand why a patient might be “noncompliant” and find ways to address the patient’s needs. And those in HIT who want to create real change, can learn from the patient experience and work with patients to ease the burden patients face in managing their health.

Note: Before the chat, you might read: Rethinking the patient: using Burden of Treatment Theory to understand the changing dynamics of illness (open access).

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What does patient burnout mean to you? #hitsm

T2: What would you like healthcare providers to know about patient burnout? #hitsm

T3: How could healthcare providers help you feel less burnt out? #hitsm

T4: What ways can technology help ease patient burnout? #hitsm

T5: What ways has technology made patient burnout worse? #hitsm

BONUS: What helps you deal with patient burnout? What advice would you give to other patients about burnout? Or what do you wish others had told you about burnout? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/10 – Medical Data Impact to Financial Health, Disability and Job Protection
Hosted by Kimberly George (@kimberlyanngeo) from @sedgwick

11/17 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

12/15 – TBD
Hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.