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Top 5 Ways to Create a Stellar Patient Experience

Posted on August 13, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Sarah Bennight, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Patient experience has always been something healthcare delivery organizations should strive to improve. However, in the past couple of years, patient experience has received a necessary focus as health consumers are presented with more choice, transparency, and data to navigate their healthcare journey. But with so many choices available, what can health providers do to drive loyalty?

I recently had to schedule a visit for my annual mammogram, a much dreaded experience for most women. I’m lucky to have many imaging options around me, making it easy to get in on a day that was convenient for me. However, the choice was very simple after the exemplary experience I received last year. One facility in particular made me into a loyal patient, and they did so in five key ways.

1. Convenience of access: Consumer-centric businesses like Amazon and Starbucks have made it so seamless and easy to get what you need from them when you need it, that it makes waiting in healthcare more painful than it used to be. Now, we expect to handle business transactions on our own terms and to receive immediate results. Even Amazon Prime’s two-day shipping wasn’t enough for us, and now we have Amazon Now. When it was time to schedule with the facility, it was simple to connect and get care when convenient for me. They offer online scheduling, which enabled me to browse open appointments and choose an option that fit my busy schedule. They have a phone number as well if you prefer to schedule that way, but I prefer doing most business transaction from my phone.

2. Patient-first in clinic experience: Everything at the facility was set up to make something no woman really wants to do, an enjoyable experience. I was greeted with a warm smile when I walked in and promptly taken back to the changing rooms. Their rooms are finely decorated with warm lighting and comfortable dressing rooms. I never sat idle for more than 10 minutes. They have even taken the extra step to provide lockers for your personal belongings with the names of famous amazing women so you can remember where your belongings are. I chose to be Eleanor Roosevelt one year, and Jane Austin this year.

3. Putting data in the patients’ hands: Both times I have been in for a screening, I receive my secure results within 24 to 48 hours and they send the results to both my OB/Gyn and my primary care provider. Armed with information contained in my profile, I can choose to have a more in depth conversation with my care providers regarding the risks and results, or I can keep them and compare year after year. Knowledge and education are the first two steps in patients having the ability to manage their health.

4. Proactive engagement in care: Patients can be very forgetful (especially when managing the care of four additional family members). If there is something I need to do in order to take better care of myself, it’s better to be proactive and ping me instead of assuming I’ve got it covered. This facility let me know several months in advance that it was time to reschedule. I knew the exact date I was eligible per my insurance, so it made it easy to take the best step to keep on top of my health.

5. Ease of doing business: No one wants to spend hours filling out paper forms. When looking for a repeat appointment for this year, I saw that there was a clinic closer to my office. I arrived a few minutes early to fill out the insurance forms since I scheduled online and there was no place for me to put the card information. When I walked in and gave my name at sign in, they had everything: my address, insurance, birthdate, records from the last visit at a different facility. This is imperative for healthcare organizations to prioritize as mergers and acquisitions mean multiple EHRs, billing systems, and contact centers. The experience and ease of doing business with your team before and after care will affect patient loyalty. Make it easier to do the small things, and watch your patient satisfaction increase.

The facility has gone to great lengths to ensure their patient experience is above par and their efforts have definitely paid off. And they will have my loyalty for it as long as they serve my area. Their mission states:

“Our promise is to provide an exceptional experience, exceptionally accurate results, and Peace of Mind to everyone we serve. Our purpose is to be the National Leader in Mammography and imaging services, helping patients achieve and maintain optimal health.”

What is your promise to your patients? Is your number one to provide an exceptional experience? Are you meeting the above five areas of the patient experience beyond the clinical face to face interaction? What are some additional ways you ensure the best experiences for everyone in your care?

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality call center & telephone answering servicespatient access services and automated communication technology. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Alleviating “Pregnancy Brain” With Appointment Reminders

Posted on July 12, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Brittany Quemby, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Brittany Quemby - Stericycle

Picture this: I’m standing on the tradeshow floor watching as people try to grab as much swag as possible. I’m speaking to someone who really isn’t listening to my spiel because they are only in it for the free pen. Then, I get someone who is fairly interested in our appointment reminder service. Thinking I’ve hooked, lined and sunk them, I am met with a familiar objection: “We don’t need an appointment reminder service for our OBGYN clinic because women, especially pregnant women, don’t forget when their appointments are.”

Thinking back, I wish I knew then what I know now and could have countered that argument with some cold hard facts.

You may have heard about little bouts of forgetfulness during pregnancy. According to most experts, pregnancy does not change a woman’s brain, but some women don’t feel as sharp as usual when they’re pregnant. Although the science is still out on whether “pregnancy brain” is truly myth or reality, being seven months pregnant, I can testify that I am definitely not at the top of my game.

I have to check that I’ve locked the door three times. I forget simple words. I have a hard time remembering anything if I don’t write it down. Of course, I remember that I am due at the doctor once a month (I’m not an animal) and enter the date and time of future appointments into my phone. But between work meetings, presentations, ultrasounds, and other appointments, I inevitably forget when I’m supposed to go in and begin to question myself. Did I write down the date correctly? Did I already miss my appointment?

Every month, this confusion and second guessing always leads me to call my doctor’s office before my appointment to check the appropriate date and time.

What I do know is that this seconding guessing and additional effort could be completely eliminated if my clinic were to provide more patient-focused engagement before my appointments with the help of simple appointment reminders. With so many other things to worry about, I have come to appreciate these gentle reminders from places like my hair stylist, masseuse, and even prenatal class instructor, all of who send me a quick note including the following:

  • Appointment date
  • Appointment time
  • Location
  • Preparation instructions and,
  • Any additional “need to knows.”

Although it may seem like pregnant women would never forget an appointment that has to do with something as pivotal as bringing a child into this world, I can firmly say it happens. And something as simple as an appointment reminder goes a long way to ease a patient’s mind and elevate their overall patient experience. Now if only I could remember the name of the OBGYN clinic from that tradeshow I was at…..

Click here, to learn more about how Stericycle Communication Solutions is helping to create the optimal patient experience through our customized automated messaging solutions.

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality answering services, online scheduling solutions, and messaging solutions. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services. Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

A Missed Opportunity For Telemedicine Vendors

Posted on June 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Today, most direct-to-consumer telemedicine companies operate on a very simple model.

You pay for a visit up front. You talk to the doctor via video, the doctor issues as a prescription if needed and you sign off. Thanks to the availability of e-prescribing options, it’s likely your medication will be waiting for you when you get to the pharmacy.

In my experience, the whole process often takes 45 minutes or less. This beats the heck out of having to wait in line at an urgent care center or worse, the emergency department.

But what about caring for chronic illnesses that can’t be managed by a drive-by virtual visit? Can telemedicine vendors play a role here? Maybe so.

We already know that combining telemedicine with remote monitoring devices can be very effective. In fact, some health systems have gone all-in on virtual chronic care management.

One fascinating example is the $54 million Mercy Virtual Care Center, which describes itself as a “hospital without beds.” The Center, which has a few hundred employees, monitors more than 3,800 remote patients; sponsors a telehealth stroke program offering neurology services to EDs nationwide; manages a team of virtual hospitalists caring for patient around-the-clock using virtual visit tools; and runs Mercy SafeWatch, which the Center says is the largest single-hub electronic intensive care unit in the U.S.

Another example of such hospital-based programs is Intermountain Healthcare’s ConnectCare Pro, which brings together 35 telehealth programs and more than 500 clinicians. Its purpose is to supplement existing staffers and offer specialized services in rural communities where some of the services aren’t available.

Given the success of programs that maintain complex patients remotely, I think a private telemedicine company managing chronic care services might work as well. While hospitals have financial reasons to keep such care in-house, I believe an outside vendor could profit in other ways. That’s especially the case given the emergence of wearable trackers and smartwatches, which are far cheaper than the specialized tools needed in the past.

One likely buyer for this service would be health plans.

I’ve heard some complain publicly that in essence, telemedicine coverage just encourages patients to access care more often, which defeats the purpose of using it to lower healthcare costs. However, if an outside vendor offered to manage patients with chronic illnesses, it might be a more attractive proposition.

After all, health plans are understandably wringing their hands over the staggering cost of maintaining the health of millions of diabetics. In 2017, for example, the average medical expense for people diagnosed with diabetes was about $16,750 per year, with $9,600 due to diabetes. If health plans could lay the cost off to a specialized telemedicine vendor, some real savings might be possible.

Of course, being a telemedicine-based chronic care management company would be far different than offering direct-to-consumer telemedicine services on an occasional basis. The vendor would have to have comprehensive health data management tools, an army of case managers, tight relationships with clinicians and a boatload of remote monitoring devices on hand. None of this would come cheaply.

Still, while I haven’t fully run the numbers, my guess is that this could be a sustainable business model. It’s worth a try.

Stanford Survey Generates Predictable Result: Doctors Want EHR Changes

Posted on June 11, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I know you’re going to have trouble believing this, but many PCPs think EHRs need substantial changes.

Such is the unsurprising conclusion drawn by a survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Stanford Medicine. The poll, which took place between March 2 and March 27 of this year, surveyed 521 PCPs licensed to practice in the U.S. who have been using their current EHR system for at least one month.

The physicians were recruited via snail mail from the American Medical Association Masterfile. Figures for years in practice by gender, region and primary medical specialty were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population of PCPs in the U.S.

According to the survey, about two-thirds of PCPs think EHRs have generally improved care (63%). Two-thirds said they were at least somewhat satisfied with their current systems, though only 18% were very satisfied.

Meanwhile, a total of 34% were somewhat or very dissatisfied with their system, and 40% of PCPs said that EHRs create more challenges than benefits. Also, 49% of office-based PCPs reported that using an EHR detracts from their clinical effectiveness.  Forty-four percent of PCPs said that primary value of EHRs is data storage, while just 8% said that the biggest benefits were clinically-related.

To improve EHRs’ clinical value, it will take a lot of effort, with 51% saying they think EHRs need a complete overhaul.  Seventy-two percent of PCPs said that improving user interfaces could best address their needs in the immediate future.

Meanwhile, 67% of respondents said that solving interoperability problems should be the top priority for EHR development over the next decade, and 43% reported wanting improved predictive analytics capabilities.

Nearly all (99%) of PCPs said that EHR capabilities should include maintaining a high-quality record of patient data over time, followed closely by providing an intuitive user experience. Also, 88% said that providing clinical decision support at the moment of care was important, followed by identifying high-risk patients in their patient panel (86%).

When asked what EHR features they found most satisfying, they cited maintaining a high-quality patient record (73%), offering patients access to medical records (71%), sharing information with providers across the care continuum (65%) and supporting practice/revenue cycle management needs (60%).

However, EHRs still have a long way to go in offering other preferred capabilities, including changing and adapting in response to user feedback, improving patient-provider interaction, coordinating care for patients with complex conditions and engaging patients in prescribed care plans through mobile technologies. Vendors, you have been warned.

“Shadow” Devices Expose Networks To New Threats

Posted on June 4, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A new report by security vendor Infoblox suggests that threats posed by “shadow” personal devices connected to healthcare networks are getting worse.

The study, which looks at healthcare organizations in the US, UK, Germany, and UAE, notes that the average organization has thousands of personal devices connected to their enterprise network. Including personal laptops, Kindles and mobile phones.

Employees from the US and the UK report using personal devices connected to their enterprise network for multiple activities, including social media use (39%), downloading apps (24%), games (13%) and films (7%), the report says.

It would be bad enough if these pastimes only consumed network resources and time, but the problem goes far beyond that. Use of these shadow devices can open up healthcare networks to nasty attacks. For example, social media is increasingly a vector of malware infection, where bad actors launch attacks successfully urging them to download unfamiliar files.

Health IT directors responding to the study also said there were a significant number of non-business IoT devices connected to their network including fitness trackers (49%), digital assistants like Amazon Alexa (47%), smart TVs (46%), smart kitchen devices such as connected kettles of microwaves (33%) and game consoles such as the Xbox or PlayStation (30%).

In many cases, exploits can take total control of these devices, with serious potential consequences. For example, one can turn a Samsung Smart TV into a live microphone and other smart TVs could be used to steal data and install unwanted apps.

Of course. IT directors aren’t standing around and ignoring these threats and have developed policies for dealing with them. But the report argues that their security policies for connected devices aren’t as effective as they think. For example, while 88% of the IT leaders surveyed said their security policy was either effective or very effective, employees didn’t even know it was in effect in many cases.

In addition, 85% of healthcare organizations have also increased their cybersecurity spending over the past year, and 12% of organizations have increased it by over 50%. Most HIT leaders appear to be focused on traditional solutions, including antivirus software (60%) and cybersecurity investments (57%). In addition, more than half of US healthcare IT professionals said their company invests in encryption software.

Also, about one-third of healthcare IT professionals said the company is investing in employee education (35%), email security solutions and threat intelligence (30%). One in five were investing in biometric solutions.

Ultimately, what this report makes clear is that health IT organizations need to reduce the number of unauthorized personal devices connected to their network. Nearly any other strategy just puts a band-aid on a gaping wound.

How Technology Helped My Family Receive a Better Healthcare Experience

Posted on May 10, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Brittany Quemby, Marketing Strategist for Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Brittany Quemby - Stericycle

When was the last time you had a truly outstanding patient experience? For my family, two healthcare facilities located hours apart recently teamed up to make our lives significantly more convenient. Without modern technology, however, our new reality may never have been possible. Let’s start from the beginning.

A few years ago, my family member suffered a heart attack that caused a traumatic brain injury. He was treated at a major facility about two hours away from his home for speech therapy, occupational therapy, neurological care, cardiologist support, and more. After a year of hard work, he was discharged from the hospital and was able to move back to his home town.

Unfortunately, his community hospital was not equipped to provide the specific care he required. So for the next two years, he and his wife, who is now his primary care giver, commuted to the city multiple times a week to ensure he received the care he needed.

Eventually, we all wondered the same thing: Isn’t there a better way?

After many meetings with the facility that treated my relative and our local hospital, we started discussing how digital health experiences and virtual care could augment my family’s patient and caregiver experience. We were determined to find a solution that provided care options and choice, and allowed them to continue receiving the necessary care without the exhaustion of “living on the road.”

A recent study by Accenture said it best: “Finding the best combination of traditional in-person services and making those same services available virtually can offer consumers the choice they want in deciding when and how they receive care and support.”

Fortunately, we learned that our local hospital was equipped to provide virtual care. However, many patients had not yet taken advantage of these technologies. After some coordinating between facilities, we were able to set up ongoing virtual appointments. These appointments enabled my family member to receive care in a much more convenient setting.

With virtual appointments, they can even:

  • Easily schedule virtual appointments
  • Participate in the appointments from the comfort of a boardroom at the hospital
  • Consult with the first hospital’s specialist and also an in-person care facilitator
  • Receive follow-up health reminders and education directly after the appointment

Now, almost half of his appointments have transitioned to virtual appointments. And my family is not the only one taking advantage of this care capability. Recent research explores the many reasons why healthcare consumers are making this virtual shift:

  • One of the top three reasons why consumers tried virtual health was convenience. 37% said it was more convenient than traditional, in-person health services
  • 76% of people would have a follow-up appointment (after seeing a doctor or healthcare professional)
  • 74% would get virtual follow-up care services in their home after being hospitalized
  • 73% would discuss a specific health concern virtually with a doctor or other healthcare people and
  • 72% would be open to getting virtual daily support to manage an ongoing health issue

Consumer willingness to demand choice and becoming more involved in their health is rising. Like my family, more patients are ready to collaborate with clinicians, embrace new technologies, and explore digital health experiences that can help manage our health and create more convenient and engaging patient experiences.

Learn more about how Stericycle Communication Solutions is helping create the optimal patient experience through a combination of human and tech-enabled communication services. Check out our service overview here!

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality live agent services, scheduling solutions, and automated messaging solutions.  Stericycle Communication Solutions provides unified human & tech-enabled communication solutions for optimized patient experiences.  Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

Why You Shouldn’t Take Calculated Risks with Security

Posted on May 9, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Erin Gilmer (@GilmerHealthLaw).

Calculated risks are often lauded in innovation.  However, with increasing security breaches in the tech industry, it is time to reassess the calculated risks companies take in healthcare.

Time and again, I have advised technology companies and medical practices to invest in security and yet I am often met with resistance, a culture of calculated risk prevails.  To these companies and practices, this risk may make sense to them in the short term. Resources are often limited and so they often believe that they needn’t spend the time and money in security.  However, the notion that a company or a practice can take this chance is ill advised.

As a recent study conducted by HIMSS (and reviewed by Ann Zieger here) warns, “significant security incidents are projected to continue to grow in number, complexity and impact.” Thus in taking the calculated risk not to invest in security, companies and practices are creating greater risk for in the long run, one that comes with severe consequences.

As we have seen outside of healthcare, even “simple” breaches of user names and passwords as happened to Under Armour’s MyFitnessPal app, become relatively important use cases as examples of the impact a security breach can have. While healthcare companies typically think of this in terms of HIPAA compliance and oversight by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR), the consequences reach far wider.  Beyond the fines or even jail time that the OCR can impose, what these current breaches show us is how easy it is for the public to lose trust in an entity.  For a technology company, this means losing valuation which could signal a death knell for a startup. For a practice, this may mean losing patients.  For any entity, it will likely result in substantial legal fees.

Why take the risk not to invest in security? A company may think they are saving time and money up front and the likelihood of a breach or security incident is low. But in the long run, the risk is too great – no company wants to end up with their name splashed across the headlines, spending more money on legal fees, scrambling to notify those whose information has been breached, and rebuilding lost trust.  The short term gain of saving resources is not worth this risk.

The best thing a company or practice can do to get started is to run a detailed risk assessment. This is already required under HIPAA but is not always made a priority.  As the HIMSS report also discussed, there is no one standard for risk assessment and often the OCR is flexible knowing entities may be different sizes and have different resource. While encryption standards and network security should remain a high priority with constant monitoring, there are a few standard aspects of risk assessment including:

  • Identifying information (in either physical or electronic format) that may be at risk including where it is and whether the entity created, received, and/or is storing it;
  • Categorizing the risk of each type of information in terms of high, medium, or low risk and the impact a breach would have on this information;
  • Identifying who has access to the information;
  • Developing backup systems in case information is lost, unavailable, or stolen; and
  • Assessing incidence response plans.

Additionally, it is important to ensure proper training of all staff members on HIPAA policies and procedures including roles and responsibilities, which should be detailed and kept up to date in the office.

This is merely a start and should not be the end of the security measures companies and practices take to ensure they do not become the next use case. When discussing a recent $3.5 million settlement, OCR Director Roger Severino recently emphasized that, “there is no substitute for an enterprise-wide risk analysis for a covered entity.” Further, he stressed that “Covered entities must take a thorough look at their internal policies and procedures to ensure they are protecting their patients’ health information in accordance with the law.”

Though this may seem rudimentary, healthcare companies and medical practices are still not following simple steps to address security and are taking the calculated risk not to – which will likely be at their own peril.

About Erin Gilmer
Erin Gilmer is a health law and policy attorney and patient advocate. She writes about a range of issues on different forums including technology, disability, social justice, law, and social determinants of health. She can be found on twitter @GilmerHealthLaw or on her blog at www.healthasahumanright.wordpress.com.

Privacy Fears May Be Holding Back Digital Therapeutics Adoption

Posted on May 3, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Consumers were already afraid that their providers might not be able to protect the privacy of their health data. Given the daily news coverage of large data breaches and since the Facebook data scandal blew up, consumers may be even less likely try out new digital health approaches.

For example, a new study by innovation consultancy Enspektos has concluded that patients may be afraid to adopt digital therapeutics options. Many fear that the data might be compromised or the technology may subject them to unwanted personal surveillance.

Without a doubt, digital therapeutics could have a great future. Possibilities include technologies such as prescription drugs with embedded sensors tracking medication compliance, as well as mobile apps that could potentially replace drugs. However, consumers’ appetite for such innovations may be diminishing as consumer fears over data privacy grow.

The research, which was done in collaboration with Savvy Cooperative, found that one-third of respondents fear that such devices will be used to track their behavior in invasive ways or that the data might be sold to a third party without the permission. As the research authors note, it’s hard to argue that the Facebook affair has ratcheted up these concerns.

Other research by Enspektos includes some related points:

  • Machine-aided diagnosis is growing as AI, wearables and data analytics are combined to predict and treat diseases
  • The deployment of end-to-end digital services is increasing as healthcare organizations work to create comprehensive platforms that embrace a wide range of conditions

It’s worth noting that It’s not just consumers who are worried about new forms of hacker intrusions. Industry CIOs have been fretting as it’s become more common for cybercriminals to attack healthcare organizations specifically. In fact, just last month Symantec identified a group known as Orangeworm that is breaking into x-ray, MRI and other medical equipment.

If groups like Orangeworm have begun to attack medical devices — something cybersecurity experts have predicted for years — we’re looking at a new phase in the battle to protect hospital devices and data. If one cybercriminal decides to focus on healthcare specifically, it’s likely that others will as well.

It’s bad enough that people are worried about the downsides of digital therapeutics. If they really knew how insecure their overall medical data could be going forward, they might be afraid to even sign in to their portal again.

More Ways AI Can Transform Healthcare

Posted on April 25, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

You’ve probably already heard a lot about how AI will change healthcare. Me too. Still, given its potential, I’m always interested in hearing more, and the following article struck me as offering some worthwhile ideas.

The article, which was written by Humberto Alexander Lee of Tesser Health, looks at ways in which AI tools can reduce data complexity and detect patterns which would be difficult or even impossible for humans to detect.

His list of AI’s transformative powers includes the following:

  • Identifying diseases and providing diagnoses

AI algorithms can predict when people are likely to develop heart disease far more accurately than humans. For example, at Google healthcare technology subsidiary Verily, scientists created an algorithm that can predict heart disease by looking at the back of a person’s eyes and pinpoint early signs of specific heart conditions.

  • Crowdsourcing treatment options and monitoring drug response

As wearable devices and mobile applications mature, and data interoperability improves thanks to standards such as FHIR, data scientists and clinicians are beginning to generate new insights using machine learning. This is leading to customizable treatments that can provide better results than existing approaches.

  • Monitoring health epidemics

While performing such a task would be virtually impossible for humans, AI and AI-related technologies can sift through staggering pools of data, including government intelligence and millions of social media posts, and combine them with ecological, biogeographical and public health information, to track epidemics. In some cases, this process will predict health threats before they blossom.

  • Virtual assistance helping patients and physicians communicate clearly

AI technology can improve communication between patients and physicians, including by creating software that simplifies patient communication, in part by transforming complex medical terminology into digestible information. This helps patients and physicians engage in a meaningful two-way conversation using mobile devices and portals.

  • Developing better care management by improving clinical documentation

Machine learning technology can improve documentation, including user-written patient notes, by analyzing millions of rows of data and letting doctors know if any data is missing or clarification is needed on any procedures. Also, Deep Neural Network algorithms can sift through information in written clinical documentation. These processes can improve outcomes by identifying patterns almost invisible to human eyes.

Lee is so bullish on AI that he believes we can do even more than he has described in his piece. And generally speaking, it’s hard to disagree with him that there’s a great deal of untapped potential here.

That being said, Lee cautions that there are pitfalls we should be aware of when we implement AI. What risks do you see in widespread AI implementation in healthcare?

London Doctors Stage Protest Over Rollout Of App

Posted on April 18, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

We all know that doctors don’t take kindly to being forced to use health IT tools. Apparently, that’s particularly the case in London, where a group of general practitioners recently held a protest to highlight their problems with a telemedicine app rolled out by the National Health Service.

The doctors behind the protest are unhappy with the way the NHS structured its rollout of the smartphone app GP at Hand, which they say has created extra work and confusion among the patients.

The service, which is run by UK-based technology company Babylon Health, launched in November of last year. Using the app, patients can either have a telemedicine visit or schedule an in-person appointment with a GP’s office. Telemedicine services are available 24/7, and patients can be seen in minutes in some cases.

GP at Hand seems to be popular with British consumers. Since its launch, over 26,000 patients have registered for the service, according to the NHS.

However, to participate in the service, patients are automatically de-registered from their existing GP office when they register for GP at Hand. Many patients don’t seem to have known this. According to the doctors at the protest, they’ve been getting calls from angry former patients demanding that they be re-registered with their existing doctor’s office.

The doctors also suggest that the service gets to cherry-pick healthier, more profitable patients, which weighs down their practice. “They don’t want patients with complex mental health problems, drug problems, dementia, a learning disability or other challenging conditions,” said protest organizer Dr. Jackie Applebee. “We think that’s because these patients are expensive.” (Presumably, Babylon is paid out of a separate NHS fund than the GPs.)

Is there lessons here for US-based healthcare providers? Perhaps so.

Of course, the National Health Service model is substantially different from the way care is delivered in this country, so the administrative challenges involved in rolling out a similar service could be much different. But this news does offer some lessons to consider nonetheless.

For one thing, it reminds us that even in a system much different than ours, financing and organizing telemedicine services can be fraught with conflict. Reimbursement would be an even bigger issue than it seems to have been in the UK.

Also, it’s also of note that the NHS and Babylon Health faced a storm of patient complaints about the way the service was set up. It’s entirely possible that any US-based efforts would generate their own string of unintended consequences, the magnitude which would be multiplied by the fact that there’s no national entity coordinating such a rollout.

Of course, individual health systems are figuring out how to offer telemedicine and blend it with access to in-person care. But it’s telling that insurers with a national presence such as CIGNA or Humana aren’t plunging into telemedicine with both feet. At least none of them have seen substantial success in their efforts. Bottom line, offering telehealth is much harder than it looks.