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New Study Suggests That HIEs Deliver Value by Aggregating Patient Data

Posted on March 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Historically, I’ve been pretty skeptical about the benefits that HIEs offer, not because the concept was flawed, but that the execution was uncertain. Toss in the fact that few have figured out how to be self-supporting financially, and you have a very shaky business model on your hands. But maybe, at long last, we’re discovering better uses for the vast amount of data HIEs have been trading.

New research by one exchange suggests that some of the key value they offer is aggregating patient data from multiple providers into a longitudinal view of patients. The research, completed by the Kansas Health Information Network and Diameter Health suggests that the Qualified Clinical Data Registries promoted by MACRA/QPP could be a winning approach.

To conduct the research, the partners extracted data from the KHIN exchange on primary care practices in which more than 50,000 patients visited toward 214 care sites in 2016 and 2017. This is certainly interesting, as most of the multi-site studies I’ve seen on this scale are done within a single provider’s network. It’s also notable that the data is relatively fresh, rather than relying on, say, Medicare data which is often several years older.

According to KHIN, using interoperable interfaces to providers and collecting near real-time clinical data makes prompt quality measure calculation possible. According to KHIN executive director Laura McCrary, Ed.D., this marks a significant change from current methods. “This [approach is in stark contrast to the current model which computes quality measures from only the data in the provider’s EHR,” she notes.

FWIW, the two research partners will be delivering a presentation on the research study at the HIMSS18 conference on Friday, March 9, from 12 to 1 PM. I’m betting it will offer some interesting insights.

But even if you can’t make it to this presentation, it’s still worth noting that it emphasizes the increasing importance of the longitudinal patient record. Eventually, under value-based care, it will become critical to have access not only to a single provider’s EHR data, but rather a fuller data set which also includes connected health/wearables data, data from payer claims, overarching population health data and more. And obviously, HIEs play a major role in making this happen.

Like other pundits, I’d go so far to say that without developing this kind of robust longitudinal patient record, which includes virtually every source of relevant patient data, health systems and providers won’t be able to manage patients well enough to meet their individual patient or population health goals.

If HIEs can help us get there, more power to them.

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on January 4, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The first part of this article set a general context for health IT in 2017 and started through the year with a review of interesting articles and studies. We’ll finish the review here.

A thoughtful article suggests a positive approach toward health care quality. The author stresses the value of organic change, although using data for accountability has value too.

An article extolling digital payments actually said more about the out-of-control complexity of the US reimbursement system. It may or not be coincidental that her article appeared one day after the CommonWell Health Alliance announced an API whose main purpose seems to be to facilitate payment and other data exchanges related to law and regulation.

A survey by KLAS asked health care providers what they want in connected apps. Most apps currently just display data from a health record.

A controlled study revived the concept of Health Information Exchanges as stand-alone institutions, examining the effects of emergency departments using one HIE in New York State.

In contrast to many leaders in the new Administration, Dr. Donald Rucker received positive comments upon acceding to the position of National Coordinator. More alarm was raised about the appointment of Scott Gottlieb as head of the FDA, but a later assessment gave him high marks for his first few months.

Before Dr. Gottlieb got there, the FDA was already loosening up. The 21st Century Cures Act instructed it to keep its hands off many health-related digital technologies. After kneecapping consumer access to genetic testing and then allowing it back into the ring in 2015, the FDA advanced consumer genetics another step this year with approval for 23andMe tests about risks for seven diseases. A close look at another DNA site’s privacy policy, meanwhile, warns that their use of data exploits loopholes in the laws and could end up hurting consumers. Another critique of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act has been written by Dr. Deborah Peel of Patient Privacy Rights.

Little noticed was a bill authorizing the FDA to be more flexible in its regulation of digital apps. Shortly after, the FDA announced its principles for approving digital apps, stressing good software development practices over clinical trials.

No improvement has been seen in the regard clinicians have for electronic records. Subjective reports condemned the notorious number of clicks required. A study showed they spend as much time on computer work as they do seeing patients. Another study found the ratio to be even worse. Shoving the job onto scribes may introduce inaccuracies.

The time spent might actually pay off if the resulting data could generate new treatments, increase personalized care, and lower costs. But the analytics that are critical to these advances have stumbled in health care institutions, in large part because of the perennial barrier of interoperability. But analytics are showing scattered successes, being used to:

Deloitte published a guide to implementing health care analytics. And finally, a clarion signal that analytics in health care has arrived: WIRED covers it.

A government cybersecurity report warns that health technology will likely soon contribute to the stream of breaches in health care.

Dr. Joseph Kvedar identified fruitful areas for applying digital technology to clinical research.

The Government Accountability Office, terror of many US bureaucracies, cam out with a report criticizing the sloppiness of quality measures at the VA.

A report by leaders of the SMART platform listed barriers to interoperability and the use of analytics to change health care.

To improve the lower outcomes seen by marginalized communities, the NIH is recruiting people from those populations to trust the government with their health data. A policy analyst calls on digital health companies to diversify their staff as well. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is also getting into the act.

Specific technologies

Digital apps are part of most modern health efforts, of course. A few articles focused on the apps themselves. One study found that digital apps can improve depression. Another found that an app can improve ADHD.

Lots of intriguing devices are being developed:

Remote monitoring and telehealth have also been in the news.

Natural language processing and voice interfaces are becoming a critical part of spreading health care:

Facial recognition is another potentially useful technology. It can replace passwords or devices to enable quick access to medical records.

Virtual reality and augmented reality seem to have some limited applications to health care. They are useful foremost in education, but also for pain management, physical therapy, and relaxation.

A number of articles hold out the tantalizing promise that interoperability headaches can be cured through blockchain, the newest hot application of cryptography. But one analysis warned that blockchain will be difficult and expensive to adopt.

3D printing can be used to produce models for training purposes as well as surgical tools and implants customized to the patient.

A number of other interesting companies in digital health can be found in a Fortune article.

We’ll end the year with a news item similar to one that began the article: serious good news about the ability of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) to save money. I would also like to mention three major articles of my own:

I hope this review of the year’s articles and studies in health IT has helped you recall key advances or challenges, and perhaps flagged some valuable topics for you to follow. 2018 will continue to be a year of adjustment to new reimbursement realities touched off by the tax bill, so health IT may once again languish somewhat.

Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 24, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/27 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by CP Nerve Center (@Cpnervecenter), Lisa Davis Budzinski (@lisadbudzinski), and Becky Brandt, RN (@bbhomebody) on the topic of “Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare.”

“Fragmented Care” is costly and common

The term “feed forward” refers to designing an information system to collect patient data in real time as care is delivered. Data collection occurs from the first visit, and moves with the patient.

*If we cannot understand patients within our systems of care, how are we going to improve? Perhaps these problems can be overcome by designing data-rich, patient-centric, feed-forward information environments with real-time feedback using a novel approach that is described below.

*The objective is to turn an individual’s data into useful information that can guide intelligent action and to aggregate this patient-level information to show quantifiable results within the clinical microsystem, the healthcare macrosystem, and the community.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What extra data should be collected @ appts, to improve outcomes, patient satisfaction & help future patients? #hitsm

T2: Share an example of how Feed-Forward clinical data sytms have helped or harmed you as a pt, Or in caring for a patient. #hitsm

T3: What incentives could be used to create & improve patient centric clinical data systems? How do we connect more facilities? #hitsm

T4: Would patient satisfaction outcomes improve if patients carried full EHR on a thumb drive (etc), to share & update at the end of each visit? #hitsm

T5: Does your Doctor ask for your perspective about your plan of care or how your care is going? And about your satisfaction? #hitsm

BONUS: Is patient-centric care occurring at your medical facility? Are you asked your opinion? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
11/3 – Patient Burnout
Hosted by the Erin Gilmer (@GilmerHealthLaw)

11/10 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/17 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/24 – Thanksgiving Break!

12/1 – Using Technology to Fight EHR Burnout
Hosted by Gabe Charbonneau, MD (@gabrieldane)

12/8 – TBD
Hosted by Homer Chin (@chinhom) and Amy Fellows (@afellowsamy) from @MyOpenNotes)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 10, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/13 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by @CAQH on the topic of “Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy.”

Healthcare provider data forms the foundation of many important processes in the nation’s healthcare system, whether referring a patient to a specialist, paying insurance claims, credentialing providers or maintaining accurate provider directories. Yet access to accurate, timely provider data has remained elusive.

A lack of authoritative and reliable sources has resulted in a costly, piecemeal approach to acquiring and maintaining provider information. The commercial healthcare industry spends at least $2.1 billion annually on inefficient processes to maintain the data, according to a recent CAQH white paper.

While healthcare providers are important contributors of their professional and practice information, the task of submitting frequent updates to different organizations, through different channels, has created a significant administrative challenge.

Join @CAQH in a discussion about the role of provider engagement in improving data accuracy. Topics will cover strategies for collaboration and enhanced communication to ease the burdens on providers and users of provider data.

Reference Materials:

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: Stakeholders define provider data differently. How do you use provider data & in what role, i.e. payer, provider, consumer? #hitsm

T2: How does the shifting definition of “provider” (e.g. emerging provider types) impact data management? #hitsm

T3: How can the industry empower providers to participate more actively in data accuracy? #hitsm

T4: What can industry stakeholders do to reduce the administrative burden on providers? #hitsm

T5: What strategies would help providers and payers hold each other accountable for high-quality provider data? #hitsm

BONUS: What is the biggest opportunity you see for improving the quality of provider data right now? #hitsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/20 – Community Sharing Chat
Hosted by the #HITsm Community

10/27 – Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare
Hosted by Lisa Davis Budzinski (@lisadbudzinski)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

After Death Data Donation – A #hITsm Halloween Horror Chat

Posted on October 3, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/6 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday), Founder of #TheWalkingGallery on the topic of “After Death Data Donation.”

Since this month is October (which is heavily associated with death and horror in western cultures) and this week is National HIT week, I thought we would combine the two and talk about death and data donation. Since the 1970’s the autopsy rate in the US has plummeted to less than 10%. When the results of the autopsies are evaluated, in 30% cases the cause of death on the death certificate is a misdiagnosis.

In EHR data collection, the system is designed to capture data of a live patient and data collection stops once a patient dies. Let’s explore these topics in this week’s #hITsm Twitter chat.

References:

Here are the questions that will serve as the framework for this week’s #HITsm chat:
T1: How can we create a system that provides more access to autopsies? #HITSM

T2: How do we collect autopsy data through the EHR for quality control and public health? #HITsm

T3: How do we change a status quo that is willing to look the other way when faced with the reality of poor data about death? #HITsm

T4: How can we make after death data donation a reality for patient families? #HITsm

T5: Some states still have their autopsy data in paper systems. Does ONC need a meaningful use for a meaningful death? #HITsm

Bonus: The CDC did a great job reminding folks about disaster preparedness with their Zombie campaign. Can the do something like that to highlight the need for cause of death data? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/13 – Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy
Hosted by @CAQH

10/20 – Community Sharing Chat
Hosted by the #HITsm Community

10/27 – Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare
Hosted by Lisa Davis Budzinski (@lisadbudzinski)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Why Should Patients Control Their Health Data? Here Are A Few Ideas.

Posted on September 29, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lately, healthcare organizations have begun working to give patients more access to their personal health data. They’ve concluded that the more control patients have, the more engaged they become in your care, which in turn leads to better outcomes.

But patient engagement isn’t the only reason for giving patients the keys to their PHI. In fact, organizational control of patient health data can cause problems for everyone in the healthcare data exchange chain.

An item found on the Allscripts blog does a nice job of articulating issues that can arise.  According to the blog item, those issues include the following:

  • The patient is in the best position to address inconsistencies in their medical record. For example, if one doctor diagnoses the patient with asthma, then another physician conclusively demonstrates the patient is not asthmatic, the patient can reconcile the two physicians’ conclusions.
  • Patients have a better overview of their care than most doctors. When a chronically ill patient sees multiple clinicians, their impressions may conflict with one another, but the patient can provide context on their overall conditions.
  • If a patient consents to multiple uses of their health data, and the consents seem to be in conflict, only the patient can articulate what their intentions were.
  • If the master patient indexing process generates a false match with someone else’s records, the patient will recognize this immediately, while physicians may not.
  • Giving patients control of the record allows them to decide how long those records should be maintained. Otherwise, HIEs — or other entities not bound by record retention laws — might destroy the data prematurely.
  • When patients have control of their data, they can make sure it gets to whomever they choose. On the other hand, patient data may not make it to other care settings if providers drop the ball.

To be sure, delegating control of their PHI to patients can go too far.

For example, if they’re transmitting most or all of their health data between providers, it could pose a significant administrative burden.  Patients may not have the time or energy to route the data files between their providers, assure that data has been received on the other end and make certain that the data was formatted in a way their clinicians can use.

Also, if the patient is chronically ill and sees multiple providers, they may end up having to manage a large body of data files, and not everyone can do so effectively. Ultimately, they may get too overwhelmed to send their records to anyone, or send the wrong records, which can create complications of its own.

Still, on the whole, healthcare organizations are giving patients more control of their health data for good reasons. When patients take responsibility for their health data, they’re far more likely to understand their condition and take steps to address problems. Establishing a balance between patient and provider control may be tricky, but it can and should be done.

NY-Based HIE Captures One Million Patient Consents

Posted on September 28, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

One of the big obstacles to the free exchange of health data is obtaining patient consent to share that data. It’s all well and good if we can bring exchange partners onto a single data sharing format, but if patients don’t consent to that exchange things get ugly. It’s critical that healthcare organizations solve this problem, because without patient consent HIEs are dead in the water.

Given these issues, I was intrigued to read a press release from HEALTHeLINK, an HIE serving Western New York, which announced that it had obtained one million patient consents to share their PHI. HEALTHeLINK connects nearly 4,600 physicians, along with hospitals, health plans and other healthcare providers. It’s part of a larger HIE, the Statewide Health Information Network of New York.

How did HEALTHeLINK obtain the consents? Apparently, there was no magic involved. The HIE made consent forms available at hospitals and doctors’ offices throughout its network, as well as making the forms available for download at whyhealthelink.com. (It may also have helped that they can be downloaded in any of 12 languages.)

I downloaded the consent form myself, and I must say it’s not complicated.

Patients only need to fill out a single page, which gives them the option to a) permit participating providers to access all of their electronic health information via the HIE, b) allow full access to the data except for specific participants, c) permit health data sharing only with specific participants, d) only offer access to their records in an emergency situation, and e) forbid HIE participants to access their health data even in the case of an emergency situation.

About 95% of those who consented chose option a, which seems a bit remarkable to me. Given the current level of data breaches in news, I would’ve predicted that more patients would opt out to some degree.

Nonetheless, the vast majority of patients gave treating providers the ability to view their lab reports, medication history, diagnostic images and several additional categories of health information.

I wish I could tell you what HEALTHeLINK has done to inspire trust, but I don’t know completely. I suspect, however, that provider buy-in played a significant role here. While none of this is mentioned in the HIE’s press release or even on its website, I’m betting that the HIE team did a good job of firing up physicians. After all, if you’re going to pick someone patients would trust, physicians would be your best choice.

On the other hand, it’s also possible patients are beginning to get the importance of having all of the data available during care. While much of health IT is too abstruse for the layman (or woman), the idea that doctors need to know your medical history is clearly beginning to resonate with your average patient.

Condition Management vs. Episodic Care Management – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/29 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Brian Eastwood (@Brian_Eastwood) from @ChilmarkHIT on the topic of “Condition Management vs. Episodic Care Management.”

The status quo of episodic care management – static care plans that rely heavily on high-touch interventions – is unsustainable if the healthcare industry truly intends to lower costs and improve outcomes. In response, the industry has seen growing interest in digital chronic condition management programs that take a more holistic and individualized approach to care. By and large, these programs use short but frequent interventions that aim to address the root causes of a condition, rather than just the symptoms themselves, in an effort to help program participants manage their condition(s) and improve their quality of life.

Given the current market, health insurers and employers are more interested in adopting condition management programs that provider organizations. This isn’t surprising – employers and insurers have clear “skin in the game” to cut costs, and providers do not – but it is nonetheless disappointing. This week’s #HITsm chat will discuss what it will take for condition management programs to gain the interest of those who deliver care, not just those who pay for care.

References:

  • Assessing the Growing Market for Condition Management Solutions: Blog post and webinar
  • Condition Management: A Healthcare Disruption That Just Might Stick: Blog post

Here are the questions that will serve as the framework for this week’s #HITsm chat:
T1: What are the key drawbacks to static condition mgmt. (both tech and workflow)? #HITsm

T2: What does holistic condition mgmt. do that episodic care mgmt. doesn’t? #HITsm

T3: How can condition mgmt. show that it’s not just a “wellness program” in new clothes? #HITsm

T4: Aside from payment reform, what will it take for provider orgs to pivot to condition mgmt.? #HITsm

T5: Where do you see the market for holistic condition mgmt. in the next 3 years? #HITsm

Bonus: Which vendors or orgs are getting condition mgmt. right? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/6 – After Death Data Donation – A #hITsm Halloween Horror Chat
Hosted by Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday), Founder of #TheWalkingGallery

10/13 – Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy
Hosted by @CAQH

10/20 – Community Sharing Chat
Hosted by the #HITsm Community

10/27 – Aggregating the Patient Perspective and Incorporating It Into Software to Change Healthcare
Hosted by Lisa Davis Budzinski (@lisadbudzinski)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Public Health Agencies Struggle To Integrate With HIEs

Posted on September 21, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

New research by ONC suggests that while public health agencies might benefit from connecting with HIEs, there are still some significant barriers many need to address before doing so.

Public health agencies at both the state and local level collect information from providers as part of conducting disease surveillance activities and maintaining data registries. Though some of these registries are common – notably those focusing on childhood immunizations, birth defects and cancer—the agencies’ technical infrastructure and data formats still vary. This makes sharing data between them difficult.

One alternative to cumbersome data matching between agencies is for the agencies to integrate with an HIE. According to the ONC report, public health researchers have begun to find that at least some of the time, the data they get from HIE organizations is richer than data from clinical systems. Not only that, when public health agencies integrate their information systems with HIEs, it can help them conduct many of their functions more effectively. However, it’s still unusual to find HIE-connected agencies as of yet.

In its new report, ONC outlines what it learned about what the agencies hoped to accomplish with HIE integration and how they moved ahead with integration. To find this out, ONC contracted with Clinovations Government + Health, which participated in discussions with eight entities and analyzing more detailed information on 10 others.

Virtually all respondents had two goals for HIE integration: 1) Minimizing the number of connections needed to link providers, HIEs and agencies and 2) Helping providers meet public health requirements for Medicare and Medicaid EHR incentive programs. A small subset also said that over the longer term, they wanted to create a sustainable platform for clinical and public health exchange which could support enhanced analytics and quality measurement.

Not surprisingly, though, they face considerable challenges in making HIE integration actually happen. In most cases, technology issues were possibly the toughest nut to crack, and almost certainly the most complex. To connect with an HIE, agencies may confront incompatible transport and messaging protocols, standards problems, data classification and coding issues, inconsistent data quality, and their often-inflexible legacy systems, to name just a few of the many problems ONC cites.

As if that weren’t enough, the agencies may not have the funding in place to take on the integration effort, and/or lack a stable funding stream; don’t have the kind of cross-functional leaders in place needed to integrate their systems with HIEs; grapple with complicated patient data privacy and security issues; and bump up against state laws limiting data sharing methods.

However, through its research, the ONC did gather some useful feedback on how the agencies were coping with the long list of HIE integration challenges they face. For example, to win over the support of policymakers, some agencies have emphasized that they’ll be able to use HIE data for higher-level analytics and quality measures. The respondents also noted that HIE integration got more internal support when they got buy-in from top leaders and second-tier leaders have project management, technical and policy skills.

Given these odds, it’s little wonder that the number of public health agencies successfully integrating with HIEs is still small. That being said, there’s good reason for them to keep pushing for integration, so their number is likely to grow over the next few years.

The Impact of HIEs in Natural Disasters – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 19, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/22 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Brian Mack (@BFMack) from @GLHC_HIE on the topic of “The Impact of HIEs in Natural Disasters.”

On August 29th, 2005, Hurricane Katrina, a category 3 storm, made landfall in SE Louisiana. Torrential rain and sustained winds exceeding 110 MPH quickly overwhelmed the protective measures in place, and the subsequent storm surge breached levies and flooded huge swaths of New Orleans and surrounding areas. Mass-devastation across Louisiana and Mississippi contributed to the deaths of nearly 1,500 people, forced tens of thousands more from their homes, and caused an estimated $108 billion in property damage. At that time, only 10% of physicians were actively using electronic medical records, and electronic health information exchange was still was in its infancy. An incalculable number of paper health records were lost forever. The lack of access to patient information during and following the storm significantly hindered medical response efforts, and required years to replace.

Fast forward to Aug. 24th-26th, 2017, when Hurricane Harvey, an even larger (Cat. 4) storm struck Southern Texas, and dumped more than 40 inches of rain on the greater Houston area. While Harvey has been described as “Houston’s Katrina” in terms of its intensity and impact, the story was significantly different for the healthcare delivery system. Two health information exchanges in the region, the Greater Houston Healthconnect (GHHC) and Healthcare Access San Antonio (HASA) worked together to assist both those who stayed through the storm, as well as those who were evacuated. GHHC staff actually shuttled between shelters in the Houston area, overseeing the set-up of HIE portals, to help clinicians provide care for patients. Providers were able to maintain access to patient records, even from remote locations, using laptops and WiFi to access EHR systems in the normal way. As a result, the response to medical needs, and continuity of care for the population impacted by Harvey across Texas was seamlessly maintained at a very high level.

This week’s #HITSM Twitter chat will discuss the opportunities, challenges, and value of community-based Health Information Exchange in connecting the “last mile” of interoperability, particularly in emergency situations.

Some additional reading:

Here are the questions that will serve as the framework for this week’s #HITsm chat:
T1: What lesson(s) should we, as participants in the healthcare ecosystem, take away from events like Hurricanes Katrina & Harvey? #HITsm

T2: What roles do/should stakeholders: government (local, state, federal), HC providers, private sector, citizenry play in assuring adequate preparation for disasters? #HITsm

T3: What responsibilities do health IT infrastructure vendors (EHR), and Health Information Exchange have in supporting successful emergency response? #HITsm

T4: How do community based HIE’s differ from national interoperability efforts and/or vendor based solutions in emergency situations? #HITsm

T5: What examples from your own local communities can you share where community-based health information exchange either made a difference, or COULD have made a difference in responding to a public emergency? #HITsm

Bonus: Aside from the basic task of networking disparate healthcare providers, how could Health Information Exchange contribute to better connected communities? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/29 – Condition Management vs Episodic Care Management
Hosted by Brian Eastwood (@Brian_Eastwood) from @ChilmarkHIT

10/6 – After Death Data Donation – A #hITsm Halloween Horror Chat
Hosted by Regina Holliday (@ReginaHolliday), Founder of #TheWalkingGallery

10/13 – Role of Provider Engagement for Improving Data Accuracy
Hosted by @CAQH

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.