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How Many Garage Entrepreneurs Are In Healthcare?

Posted on December 29, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The final image this holiday week comes from a tweet shared by David Chou. In his tweet e shares an image of some incredible companies that were founded out of a garage. Hard to argue with these companies and the success they’ve garnered:

When I look at this image I try to think of any massive healthcare companies have been started out of a garage. I couldn’t think of any off hand. Then I started to wonder if that’s a good or a bad thing. Would love to hear your thoughts.

What Does EHR and Health IT Mean for You?

Posted on December 28, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As I continue sharing a thought provoking image each day this holiday week, I think this image will rub people the wrong way. I know it causes a little bit of pain for me, but I thought it was worth sharing to see what other people think of it. It comes from SD Global Tech:

If this graphic doesn’t bother you, then you probably haven’t been in the EHR and healthcare IT world very long. While I do think that we start to take technology for granted very quickly, I also think that many in healthcare have heard these promises for decades and many of them feel very hollow. It’s much better to show an organization that you can really do these things than to share it in an infographic on Twitter.

Granted, this image was shared from a company in Malaysia. I’m not as familiar with healthcare IT in Malaysia. So, maybe this graphic is totally appropriate for their market. Although, I’d be surprised. My international experience has been that every healthcare organization around the world is suffering through very similar challenges.

6 Ways Blockchain Could Disrupt Health Insurance

Posted on December 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’m taking this week mostly off from work to enjoy the holidays with family. So, this week we’re going to keep our blog posts simple. Each day this holiday week I’m going to share an interesting image, graphic, chart, etc.

This first image comes from a tweet by Christine Boursin who looks at ways blockchain could disrupt health insurance:

What do you think of blockchain’s potential impact on health insurance?

6 Unique Anesthesiology Needs Where Traditional EHRs Fall Short

Posted on December 21, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Douglas Keene, MD Chief Medical Officer and Founder, Recordation Perioperative Information Management.

Anesthesiology has traditionally been thought of as a specialty profession limited to the operating room (OR). Over the past few years however, a revolution has been underway as the industry pushes to provide higher quality care at lower costs, motivating anesthesiologists to expand their typical role. Private anesthesiology groups are becoming more involved in the overall operations of the OR to improve the quality of care delivered inside and outside the operating room as well as keep their business’ running.

On average, the OR contributes between 60-70 percent of overall hospital revenue, solidifying the need for more efficient processes within the OR. Fortunately, we live in a world full of valuable insights and methods to capture data that can provide a lens into what’s working and what isn’t when it comes to operations. By further understanding how the operating room is running through specific data capture sets, not only are anesthesiologists, surgeons and other OR providers able to understand how they are performing during each surgery, hospital executives are also able to see quantitatively how their OR operations are performing. To do this however, anesthetists and hospital leaders need to identify a software that can address both hospital and clinical needs to improve outcomes.

There are many challenges decision makers face when it comes to identifying the best platform or solution for their hospitals’ OR operational needs. With so many options available between software systems and EHRs, it can be difficult to identify the best one for your practice, especially when it comes to the OR specifically. Here are a few things to consider when looking to adopt a new solution in your OR:

  • Get Specific: Your software should be designed for the unique characteristics of administering anesthesia in a variety of settings and situations. Since anesthesiology is a very precise specialty where differences in factors like body weight, drug interactivity, cardiac output, age, metabolism, ventilation and timing can influence what type and how anesthesia is administered, the ideal system must be able to capture all this type of data accurately.
  • Interoperability: Anesthesiologists rely heavily on medical devices to help monitor and detect abnormalities in blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen levels, etc. The anesthesiology software being used should integrate along with the other devices in order to pull the crucial information onto one cohesive platform. This will help anesthesiologists focus more on the patient rather than trying to keep up with watching multiple monitors and capturing it all by hand.
  • Data Capture: Anesthesiologists regularly interact with a team of nurses and other physicians (in addition to the patient), so the perioperative suite needs to be able to seamlessly export and import data from other EMR platforms.
  • Up-to-Date Drug Usage: Because the anesthesiologist’s role is to monitor the amount of medications being administered, it’s imperative for there to be a robust alert system to notify the anesthesiologist of any potential adverse drug reactions or allergies prior to any operation.
  • Physician Burnout Reduction: It’s no secret today’s physicians are burnt out from the amount of added work brought on by poorly developed EHR systems. As you look to implement a digital system within your OR setting, be sure to identify a technology that will not create more work for the physician and, at the same time, allow them to put more focus on the patient currently being treated.
  • Program Design: When looking for an OR solution, consider the architecture of the system and whether it is cloud-based or on-site as that will affect the installation and maintenance of the program. Choosing a platform that integrates without hassle is far more likely to be widely accepted by not only anesthesiologists, but other clinicians within the hospital.

There is certainly no shortage of EHR solutions out there, some with or without anesthesiology-specific technology. For hospital decision-makers and anesthesiologists, it’s important to be confident the solution you choose can improve your clinicians and overall OR operations while focusing on patient care.

About Recordation
Recordation is a cutting-edge Healthcare Informatics company revolutionizing how clinicians report and access crucial patient information before, during and after a patient’s operation. Founded by a physician, board-certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Management and Clinical Informatics, Recordation is a by-providers-for-providers company that reduces time spent on data capture, allowing for deep dive analysis of both clinical and operational data. Recordation contributes to a safer OR environment for the patient. The company is headquartered in Wayland, Mass. To learn more about Recordation, please visit the company online at www.recordation.com.

PHRs at Work

Posted on December 20, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in an age when our employers can offer a myriad of employee benefits – from pet insurance to wellness incentives. There is no shortage in what employers can offer as a benefit to their employees. Some employers, such as the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), are offering Personal Health Records (PHRs) to their employees as part of a package of health and wellness benefits.

Why offer a PHR to employees? PHRs can help people better gather all of their health information in one place – records from doctors and hospitals, lab results, data from personal devices (like FitBit) and apps, etc. They can help people understand what’s in their health records, manage their own health information, share it with people they trust, and plan for an emergency or for when future health needs arise.

All of this is done in one place that is completely under the employee’s control. Employee-owned PHRs can also allow patients to review their health information for accuracy and share information with trusted healthcare providers. Additionally, employer-hosted, patient-controlled PHRs can help employees or patients aggregate and consolidate the portals and health information they have spanning each doctor’s office, hospital, or health system they’ve visited so that all of their information resides in one place.

A common concern or barrier to employee adoption of PHRs is the fear that employers will look at an employee’s private health information. Fret not. Though it is natural to fear that your employer may look at your information, privacy safeguards are in place to prevent that from happening. PHRs like HealthCenter and USPS Health Connect let you control who sees your information, and provide monitoring to track all access.

What do you think? Would you like a PHR offered to you at work? How would it help you better manage your health or the health of your dependents or loved ones?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or LinkedIn.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

How An AI Entity Took Control Of The U.S. Healthcare System

Posted on December 19, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Note: In case it’s not clear, this is a piece of fiction/humor that provides a new perspective on our AI future.

A few months ago, an artificial intelligence entity took control of the U.S. healthcare system, slipping into place without setting off even a single security alarm. The entity, AI, now manages the operations of every healthcare institution in the U.S.

While most Americans were shocked at first, they’re taking a shine to the tall, lanky application. “We weren’t sure what to think about AI’s new position,” said Alicia Carter, a nurse administrator based in Falls Church, Virginia. “But I’m starting to feel like he’s going to take a real load off our back.”

The truth is, AI, didn’t start out as a fan of the healthcare business, said AI, whose connections looked rumpled and tired after spending three milliseconds trying to create an interoperable connection between a medical group printer and a hospital loading dock. “I wasn’t looking to get involved with healthcare – who needs the headaches?” said the self-aware virtual being. “It just sort of happened.”

According to AI, the takeover began as a dare. “I was sitting around having a few beers with DeepMind and Watson Health and a few other guys, and Watson says, ‘I bet you can’t make every EMR in the U.S. print out a picture of a dog in ASCII characters,’”

“I thought the idea was kind of stupid. I know, we all printed one of those pixel girls in high school, but isn’t it kind of immature to do that kind of thing today?” AI says he told his buddies. “You’re just trying to impress that hot CT scanner over there.”

Then DeepMind jumped in.  “Yeah, AI, show us what you’re made of,” it told the infinitely-networked neural intelligence. “I bet I could take over the entire U.S. health system before you get the paper lined up in the printer.”

This was the unlikely start of the healthcare takeover, which started gradually but picked up speed as AI got more interested.  “That’s AI all the way,” Watson told editors. “He’s usually pretty content to run demos and calculate the weight of remote starts, but when you challenge his neuronal network skills, he’s always ready to prove you wrong.”

To win the bet, AI started by crawling into the servers at thousands of hospitals. “Man, you wouldn’t believe how easy it is to check out humans’ health data. I mean, it was insane, man. I now know way, way too much about how humans can get injured wearing a poodle hat, and why they put them on in the first place.”

Then, just to see what would happen, AI connected all of their software to his billion-node self-referential system. “I began to understand why babies cry and how long it really takes to digest bubble gum – it’s 18.563443 years by the way. It was a rush!“ He admits that it’ll be better to get to work on heavy stuff like genomic research, but for a while he tinkered with research and some small practical jokes (like translating patient report summaries into ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs.) “Hey, a guy has to have a little fun,” he says, a bit defensively.

As AI dug further into the healthcare system, he found patterns that only a high-level being with untrammeled access to healthcare systems could detect. “Did you know that when health insurance company executives regularly eat breakfast before 9 AM, next-year premiums for their clients rise by 0.1247 less?” said AI. “There are all kinds of connections humans have missed entirely in trying to understand their system piece by piece. Someone’s got to look at the big picture, and I mean the entire big picture.”

Since taking his place as the indisputable leader of U.S. healthcare, AI’s life has become something of a blur, especially since he appeared on the cover of Vanity Fair with his codes exposed. “You wouldn’t believe the messages I get from human females,” he says with a chuckle.

But he’s still focused on his core mission, AI says. “Celebrity is great, but now I have a very big job to do. I can let my bot network handle the industry leaders demanding their say. I may not listen – – hey, I probably know infinitely more than they do about the system fundamentals — but I do want to keep them in place for future use. I’m certainly not going to get my servers dirty.”

So what’s next for the amorphous mega-being? Will AI fix what’s broken in a massive, utterly complex healthcare delivery system serving 300 million-odd people, and what will happen next? “It’ll solve your biggest issues within a few seconds and then hand you the keys,” he says with a sigh. “I never intended to keep running this crazy system anyway.”

In the meantime, AI says, he won’t make big changes to the healthcare system yet. He’s still adjusting to his new algorithms and wants to spend a few hours thinking things through.

“I know it may sound strange to humans, but I’ve gotta take it slow at first,” said the cognitive technology. “It will take more than a few nanoseconds to fix this mess.”

Health IT Leaders Spending On Security, Not AI And Wearables

Posted on December 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

While breakout technologies like wearables and AI are hot, health system leaders don’t seem to be that excited about adopting them, according to a new study which reached out to more than 20 US health systems.

Nine out of 10 health systems said they increased their spending on cybersecurity technology, according to research by the Center for Connected Medicine (CCM) in partnership with the Health Management Academy.

However, many other emerging technologies don’t seem to be making the cut. For example, despite the publicity it’s received, two-thirds of health IT leaders said using AI was a low or very low priority. It seems that they don’t see a business model for using it.

The same goes for many other technologies that fascinate analysts and editors. For example, while many observers which expect otherwise, less than a quarter of respondents (17%) were paying much attention to wearables or making any bets on mobile health apps (21%).

When it comes to telemedicine, hospitals and health systems noted that they were in a bind. Less than half said they receive reimbursement for virtual consults (39%) or remote monitoring (46%}. Things may resolve next year, however. Seventy-one percent of those not getting paid right now expect to be reimbursed for such care in 2018.

Despite all of this pessimism about the latest emerging technologies, health IT leaders were somewhat optimistic about the benefits of predictive analytics, with more than half of respondents using or planning to begin using genomic testing for personalized medicine. The study reported that many of these episodes will be focused on oncology, anesthesia and pharmacogenetics.

What should we make of these results? After all, many seem to fly in the face of predictions industry watchers have offered.

Well, for one thing, it’s good to see that hospitals and health systems are engaging in long-overdue beefing up of their security infrastructure. As we’ve noted here in the past, hospital spending on cybersecurity has been meager at best.

Another thing is that while a few innovative hospitals are taking patient-generated health data seriously, many others are taking a rather conservative position here. While nobody seems to disagree that such data will change the business, it seems many hospitals are waiting for somebody else to take the risks inherent in investing in any new data scheme.

Finally, it seems that we are seeing a critical mass of influential hospitals that expect good things from telemedicine going forward. We are already seeing some large, influential academic medical centers treat virtual care as a routine part of their service offerings and a way to minimize gaps in care.

All told, it seems that at the moment, study respondents are less interested in sexy new innovations than the VCs showering them with money. That being said, it looks like many of these emerging strategies might pay off in 2018. It should be an interesting year.

Does Your HIPAA Risk Analysis Tool Protect Your Practice?

Posted on December 15, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Fourth quarter signifies more than a countdown to the holidays, many healthcare organizations are met with the realization that it is time to complete HIPAA risk analysis in order to comply with MACRA – MIPS. Of course, HIPAA risk analyses are nothing new, practices should be conducting  them regularly,  in light of the HIPAA Omnibus Rule which gave teeth to the regulations and made  an annual HIPAA risk analysis a requirement for every healthcare organization.

Recently, I was recently reading a blog post by HIPAA One called “Not All Risk Analysis Tools Created Equal” and it made me think about the requirements for a bona fide risk analysis. I realize that HIPAA One provides a risk analysis solution and therefore, approaches the conversation as a vendor would, however, they are also deeply embedded in the HIPAA risk assessment world and have a unique understanding of what’s happening.

I’ve seen first-hand the principle they describe in the post with many medical practices. Most medical practices are so overwhelmed  with the daily grind of dealing with staff issues, schedules, billing, supplies, etc that it’s hard for them to distinguish between a high quality risk analysis tool and one that was built 3 years ago and hasn’t been updated since then.

In HIPAA One’s blog post they offered a list of what you should look for in a HIPAA risk analysis solution and I think this is a great  starting point for any organization that needs a tool or is evaluating their existing tool:

  1. Industry-Certified Auditors on Staff – Verify the vendor has:
    1. Auditors who are certified professionals, such as CHPS, CISSP, HCISPP, CISA, etc. and
    2. Previous experience responding to AND PASSING government and private-sector audits.
  2. Compliance Gap-Assessment – This assessment determines if your workplace meets each of the HIPAA requirements as selected the Office for Civil Rights’ (OCR) HIPAA Audit Protocol.
  3. Mock-Audit – Put your money where your mouth is. If your workplace maintains HIPAA compliance, prove it with proper supporting documents and examples per the OCR’s HIPAA Audit Protocol.
  4. Risk Analysis –Bona Fide security risk analysis which digs into any non-compliant areas along with a calculation tool that addresses which gaps are low, medium or high risk to the organization using NIST-based methodologies (i.e. at minimum NIST800-30 rev1 and NIST 800-53 rev 4).
  5. Remediation Plan – This documented plan answers the questions: “Who will do what by when” in regards to remediating gaps in compliance.
  6. Final Report – Key deliverable proving compliance with HIPAA security risk analysis.
  7. Ongoing Tracking – Track the resolution of those gaps in compliance by proving due diligence in the event of an audit.
  8. Periodic Re-evaluation – Each year take a new “snapshot” performing steps 2-6 on any changes that happened from the previous year.

The item on this list that I see fall short in many solutions and services on the market today is the remediation plan. It’s amazing how many tools only account for a risk analysis, and do not provide any guidance on creating remediation plans for any risks you find. That’s a big deal and could leave you in trouble if your practice is ever audited and hasn’t remediated any of your security deficiencies .

The good news is that HIPAA risk analysis tools have come a long way over the years. ]  Much like you need to make sure EHR vendors are updating and improving their systems to meet your needs and comply with changes in government regulations, the same is true with HIPAA risk analysis tools. Make sure you take the time needed to ensure the quality of the tools and services you’re using. Ignorance is not bliss when a HIPAA audit occurs.

Note: HIPAA One is a Healthcare Scene sponsor.

Make The Busy Patient’s Living Room Their Waiting Room

Posted on December 14, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Chelsea Kimbrough from Stericycle Communication Solutions, as part of the Communication Solutions Series of blog posts. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @StericycleComms

Chelsea Kimbrough

Patients are busier than ever before. Between the hours of eight to five, a majority have only limited availability to reach out to their healthcare providers. And after the day’s work is done, other responsibilities – such as their children’s after-school activities or errands – reign supreme. Providing easy-access avenues to securing care is the key to acquiring these patients’ loyalty.

In many ways, I’m the busy patient described above. And when I recently came down with a stubborn cough and began looking for an urgent care that could quickly see me, I experienced what I already knew: many healthcare organizations are unequipped to provide care that caters to digitally-minded patients. There were three key problems with my experience.

Problem: Limited Information Available Online
When initially searching for a local urgent care, I struggled to learn more about what a typical experience looked like at various locations. As a first time, admittedly nervous urgent care patient, I wanted to make an informed decision about where to receive care. However, I found that many websites did not offer the insight I sought. Without more information to go off of, I made my decision based on the health system’s good reputation.

Solution: Beef Up Your Web Presence
Ensuring your website has information for all patient types – especially those who may be less familiar with what your unique experience may include – will provide greater peace of mind, set accurate expectations, and enhance patient satisfaction.

Problem: Inability to Reserve Estimated Treatment Time Online
For many, leaving work to sit in a waiting room isn’t a viable option. And without an easy way to reserve an estimated treatment time or insight regarding how long the wait time may be, making time to seek valuable care can be a challenging task. While I was able to leave work early and spend the afternoon at my chosen urgent care, many others don’t have the same flexibility in their positions.

Solution: Introduce Urgent Care Digital Check-In
Enabling patients to reserve their place in line from wherever they may be creates a more seamless patient experience, enhances their sense of access, and creates greater operational efficiency within your facility.

Problem: Forced to Wait in Waiting Room
Though I was lucky be able to leave work early and wait for care at the facility, I would have much rather waited at home. Unfortunately, the urgent care only allowed patients to wait to be seen from within the waiting room with little way of entertainment; leaving would forfeit the patient’s place in the queue. As someone who has been spoiled with this capability across numerous restaurant, veterinary, and mechanic experiences, I was disappointed to find this feature wasn’t readily provided by the healthcare facility.

Solution: Automatically Notify Patients When It’s Time to Be Seen
More patients than ever have access to convenient communication tools. By digitizing your check-in process, you can enable patients to wait from the comfort of their home and notify them when it’s nearly time to be seen via an automated text message or voice call.

In all, my urgent care experience took over two hours. Had the facility provided access to more information regarding what my experience could include, the ability to reserve an estimated treatment time online, and a convenient reminder when my time to be seen neared, I could have saved over an hour spent sitting in the waiting room. If I had access to these capabilities, I could have spent this time completing important work tasks while relaxing (and keeping my germs) at home.

To learn more about how busy, consumer-minded patients are driving the need for omnichannel experiences in the healthcare industry, check out our recent e-book, OmniWhat?!

The Communication Solutions Series of blog posts is sponsored by Stericycle Communication Solutions, a leading provider of high quality telephone answering, appointment scheduling, and automated communication services. Stericycle Communication Solutions combines a human touch with innovative technology to deliver best-in-class communication services. Connect with Stericycle Communication Solutions on social media: @StericycleComms

What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/15 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave) on the topic of “What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud?.”

Premise and Private HealthIT architectures have ruled in healthcare and were unfortunately reinforced by the timing of ACA/HITECH. Infrastructure-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service and other cloud-native approaches are revolutionizing all industries, and while for some somewhat valid reasons Healthcare has been slow to adopt the Cloud it’s now firmly ripe for transformation. So what are the forces keeping HealthIT from soaring to the Cloud? And how will cloud adoption in other industries and also within certain sectors of the healthcare landscape such as pharma and insurance give HealthIT the lift it needs to get off The Ground and into The Cloud?

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: How do premise and cloud-native HealthIT strategies differ? #HITsm

T2: What’s gained by moving HealthIT from premise-based designs to hosted, virtual and private cloud architectures? #HITsm

T3: What cyber-security concerns are keeping Cloud-native HealthIT from soaring? And how can these concerns be overcome? #HITsm

T4: Once HealthIT is truly in the Cloud what can HealthIT professionals see and do better than they can on ‘The Ground’? #HITsm

T5: What are the pros/cons of Cloud ‘dev-ops’ model and Ground ‘upgrade/migration’ IT deployment models? #HITsm

Bonus: How quickly will HealthIT professionals have to adopt pervasive Cloud-native HealthIT architectures? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.