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Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 18, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/21 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop on the topic of “Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients“.

I, Jen Horonjeff, have a confession – I’m one of the dreaded “non-compliant” patients you hear about. I have been living with juvenile arthritis and other autoimmune diseases for 33 years, so I often have a complex treatment plan. One of my biggest offenses is I don’t get my blood work done every four weeks, which is the regularity for which my doctor has ordered my labs.

I don’t have a fear of needles, it’s also relatively quick to drop into the lab and do, so why don’t I do it?

Because every time I do, the system fails me. The lab inevitably sends me a bill for an exorbitant amount of money claiming my insurance won’t cover it. That’s incorrect, they will, it’s just been billed incorrectly. Yet it’s up to me as a patient to sit on the phone for hours with the lab, the insurance company, my doctor’s office, and probably a friend to vent about it…again.

Healthcare, its systems, products and services, are supposed to improve the lives of patients and families, not create more headaches. But the problem is, until recently, no one really ever asked the patients what they were going through, what mattered to them, or their input how to fix it. Patients have been the recipients of the systems we develop, rather than the co-creators.

This is where human-centered design comes in. Human-centered design is about taking the time to #askpatients and design solutions to fit them, rather than continually have them navigate systems and tools that, at times, feel like a cruel joke. I’m not a bad patient because I don’t get my labs done. I am just exhausted by a system that did not incorporate proper human-centered design.

We all have a role to play to improve this. After a lifetime of stumbling through the healthcare system, I decided to do something about it and started Savvy Cooperative. Savvy is a patient-owned co-op that provides a marketplace for patient insights. Our goal is to make it so easy to connect and work with patients and healthcare consumers there is no excuse not to. I believe the future of healthcare is co-designed with patients.

As you go about your work or interface with the healthcare system, I hope you’ll be on the lookout for all the hoops patients jump through and think, “did anyone #askpatients about this?”

If you need examples where lack of human-centered design affects patients, check out some of our #MessedUpPtExp videos, featuring our friendly Savvy Puppets. Then, join us for this week’s #HITsm chat where we’ll discuss it in further detail.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
Ice Breaker: We’ve got a Spotify playlist going of song titles that describe the current state of healthcare – what would you add to our #HealthcareSoundtrack? #HITsm

T1: Everyone has one, what’s one of the messed up patient experiences you’ve personally gone through or heard someone else go through that showed lack of human-centered design? #HITsm

T2: How can technology help to ease these headaches and improve the patient experience, rather than make it worse (feel free to use responses from T1 for inspiration!)? #HITsm

T3: Do you think patients can bring unique and valuable perspectives to the table that can make these technologies even better, and how so? #HITsm

T4: Let’s lay it out there, what are the reasons you have heard for why people or companies don’t work more directly with patients? #HITsm

T5: Some of the big consumer brands have mastered the user experience, but what do they need to do to truly improve the patient experience? #HITsm

Bonus: Who are some of the companies or individuals you feel are winning at human-centered design in healthcare, and what are they doing to show that? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Applying AI Based Outlier Detection to Healthcare – Interview with Dr. Gidi Stein from MedAware

Posted on September 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most people who receive healthcare understand that healthcare is as much art as it is science. We don’t expect our doctors to be perfect or know everything because the human body is just too complex and there are so many factors that influence health. What’s hard for patients to understand is when obvious human errors occur. This is especially true when technology or multiple layers of humans should have caught the obvious.

This is exactly why I was excited to interview Dr. Gidi Stein, CEO and Co-founder of MedAware. As stated on their website, their goal is to eliminate prescription errors. In the interview below, you’ll learn more about what MedAware and Dr. Stein are doing to achieve this goal.

Tell us a little about yourself and MedAware.

Early in my career, I worked in the Israeli high-tech industry and served as CTO and Chief Architect of several algorithm-rich startups. However, after many years working in technology, I decided to return to school and study medicine. In 2002, I graduated from Tel Aviv University Medical School with a specialization in internal medicine, treating patients and teaching students and residents in one of Israel’s largest hospitals.

After working as a physician for several years, I heard a heartbreaking story, which ultimately served as my motivation and inspiration to found MedAware. A physician was treating a 9-year-old boy who suffered from Asthma. To treat the symptoms, the physician entered the electronic prescribing environment and selected Singulair from the drop-down menu, a standard treatment for asthma. However, unfortunately, he accidentally clicked Sintrom, an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Tragically, neither the physician, pharmacist nor parent caught this error, which resulted in the boys’ untimely death. This avoidable, medication-related complication and death was caused by a typo.

Having worked as a physician for many years, I had a difficult time understanding that with all the medical intervention and technological support we rely on, our healthcare system was not intelligent enough to prevent errors like this. This was a symptom of a greater challenge; how can we identify and prevent medication related complications before they occur? Given my combined background in technology and medicine, I knew that there must be a solution to eliminate these types of needless errors. I founded MedAware to transform patient safety and save lives.

Describe the problem with prescription-based medication errors that exists today.  What’s the cause of most of these errors?

Every year in the U.S. alone, there are 1.5 million preventable medication errors, which result in patient injury or death. In fact, medication errors are the third leading cause of death in the US, and errors related to incorrect prescription are a major part of these. Today’s prescription-related complications fall into two main categories: medication errors that occur at the point of order entry (like the example of the 9yr old boy) and errors that result from evolving adverse drug events (ADEs). Point of order entry errors are a consequence of medication reconciliation challenges, typos, incorrect dosage input and other clinical inconsistencies.

Evolving ADEs are, in fact, the bulk of the errors that occur – almost 2/3 of errors are those that happen after a medication was correctly prescribed. These are often the most catastrophic errors, as they are completely unforeseen, and don’t necessarily result from physician error. Rather, they occur when a patient’s health status has changed, and a previously safe medication becomes unsafe.

MedAware uses AI to detect outlier prescriptions.  It seems that everything is being labeled AI, so how does this work and how effective is it at detecting medication errors?

AI is best used to analyze large scale data to identify patterns and outliers to those patterns. The common theme in industries, such as aviation, cyber security and credit card fraud, is that they are rich with millions of transactions, 99.99% of which are okay. But, a small fraction of them are hazardous, and these dangers most often occur in new and unexpected ways. In these industries, AI is used to crunch millions of transactions, identify patterns, and most importantly, identify outliers to those patterns as potential hazards with high accuracy.

Medication safety is similar to these industries. Here too, millions of medications are prescribed and dispensed every day, and in 99.99% of cases, the right medication is prescribed and dispensed to the right patient. But, on rare occasions, an unexpected error or oversight may put patients at risk. MedAware analyzes millions of clinical records to identify errors and oversights as statistical outliers to the normal behavioral patterns of providers treating similar patients. Our data shows that this methodology, identifies errors and ADEs with high accuracy and clinical relevance and that most of the errors found by our system would not have been caught by any other existing system.

Are most of the errors you find obvious errors that a human could have detected but just missed or are you finding surprising errors as well?  Can you share some stories of what you’ve found?

The errors that we find are obvious errors; any physician would agree that they are indeed erroneous. These include: prescribing chemotherapy to healthy individuals, not stopping anticoagulation to a bleeding patient, birth control pills to a 70-year-old male and prescribing Viagra to a 2-year-old baby. All of these are obvious errors, so why didn’t the prescribers pick these up? The answer is simple: they are human, and humans err, especially when they are less experienced and over worked. Our software is able to mirror back to the providers the crowdsourced behavioral patterns of their peers and identify outliers to these patterns as errors.

You recently announced a partnership with Allscripts and their dbMotion interoperability solution.  How does that work and what’s the impact of this partnership?

Today’s healthcare systems have created a reality where patient health information can be scattered across multiple health systems, infrastructures and EHRs. The dbMotion health information exchange platform aggregates and harmonizes that scattered patient data, delivering the information clinicians need in a usable and actionable format at the point of care, within the provider’s native and familiar workflow. With dbMotion, all of the patient’s records are in one place. MedAware sits on top of the bdMotion interoperability platform as a layer of safety, accurately looking at the thousands of clinical inputs in the system and warning with even greater accuracy. MedAware catches various medication errors that would have been missed due to a decentralized patient health record. In addition to identifying prescription-based medication errors, MedAware can also notify physicians of patients who are at risk of opioid addiction.

This partnership will allow any institution using Allscripts’ dbMotion to easily implement MedAware’s system in a streamlined manner, with each installation being quick and effortless.

Once MedAware identifies a prescription error, how do you communicate that information back to the provider? Do you integrate your solution with the EHR vendor?

Yes, MedAware is integrated with EHR platforms. This is necessary for error detection and communication of the warning to the provider. There are two intervention scenarios: 1) Synchronous – when errors are caught at the point of order entry, a popup alert appears within the EHR user interface, without disturbing the provider’s workflow, and the provider can choose to accept or reject the alert. 2) Asynchronous – the errors/ADE is caught following a change in the patient’s clinical record (i.e. new lab result or vital sign), long after the prescription was entered. These alerts are displayed as a physician’s task, within the physician’s workflow and the EHR’s user interface.

What’s next for MedAware?  Where are you planning to take this technology?

The next steps for us are:

  1. Scale our current technology to grow to 20 million lives analyzed by 2020
  2. Create additional patient safety centered solutions to providers, such as opioid dependency risk assessment, gaps in care and trend projection analysis.
  3. Share our life-saving insights directly to those who need it most – consumers.

Epic to Hold Startup Competition at App Orchard Conference

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know it’s Friday and we usually do a Fun Friday post, but while this might look like a joke I assure you it’s not. Epic has recently announced to their App Orchard community that they’ll be doing a startup competition. The prize is $5k and “an opportunity to share their pitch with a senior Epic executive to get feedback and advice, and bragging rights.”

The startup competition is being held at the Epic App Orchard Conference happening Oct 24-26th at Epic’s headquarters in Verona. For those not familiar with App Orchard, it’s basically Epic’s partner program. The Founder or CEO of the startup is required to be there to be part of the Startup Pitch competition.

The contest is a little confusing because all tiers of App Orchard members are eligible to participate. However, companies don’t have to have to have an app in the app store yet. This would have been even more interesting if they opened it up outside the App Orchard community as well. However, given the short time frame to submit and then be on stage at the conference, I have a feeling this was a kind of last minute idea that they’re making happen and so they wanted to keep it simple.

Who would have thought that Epic would hold a startup competition? Is Epic finally seeing that there’s a lot of value to them and more importantly to their customers to have a more open approach to working with partners? Ok. A startup competition is a small step, but it feels like a huge one for Epic given past history.

The deadline to apply for the competition is Sep 28th, so it might be tight for companies that aren’t already a member of App Orchard to become a member and take part, but I’d be interested to hear if any company tries. I’ll be interested to hear what companies choose to take part in the competition and what ideas they pitch. Epic is currently displaying 111 apps in their App Orchard gallery.

Times are a changing at Epic. What’s next for Epic? They’re going to start acquiring companies? Let’s not get too crazy.

Latest Apple Watch to Cure Heart Disease (Yes, That’s the Sarcasm Font)

Posted on September 13, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

By this point, I think that most people have seen the big announcement coming out of the Apple event that the Apple Watch 4 now has ECG and other heart monitoring capabilities built in. The watch will notify you if your heart rate is too low and instances of atrial fibrillation that it detects. Plus, all of this is done as an FDA cleared device (some are reporting that Apple got their FDA clearance in 30 days which is crazy fast for a medical device).

The response to this announcement has been quite interesting. Most aren’t surprised that Apple has been moving more and more into healthcare. Plus, there have been a lot of reports that have mistakenly called this the first consumer ECG which it’s not. AliveCor deserves that credit and I recently wrote about another consumer ECG which is just one of many that are coming. However, many are suggesting that the Apple Watch will be the first time that many younger, healthier people will be regularly using an ECG like this. That’s an interesting idea.

As you might have assumed by the title of this post, I think the Apple Watch announcement isn’t much ado about nothing, but it’s also not the announcement of “sliced bread” being invented either. Let’s dive into what this announcement really means for healthcare.

As I mentioned when I wrote about the other consumer ECG, there’s currently somewhat limited value in what can be done with a single lead ECG. So, it’s important to keep this Apple Watch announcement in the right perspective even though I’m sure most consumers won’t understand these details. One person even commented on how Apple created messaging that calls it an “intelligent health guardian” to confuse people while still avoiding liability:

Perception sells and Apple is as good at creating perception as anyone. Will many more people buy an Apple Watch if they perceive it as something that will help them monitor their health better? Definitely. However, there are some other consequences that many doctors are warning about when it comes to this type of tracking hitting the masses.

First up is Dr. Nick van Terheyden who provides a comparative example of why all this “testing” could lead to a lot of incidentloma’s (Nice word I assume he made up to describe false positives in health tests):

A nephrologist at Cricket Health, Carmen A. Peralta, chimed in with this perspective:

The problem with these devices is that it’s not in Apple’s best interest to truly educate a patient on what the device can and can’t do. If a single lead ECG like this was a reliable arbitrator of when to go to the ED or when to not go, then it would be extremely valuable. However, many doctors I’ve talked to are suggesting that a single lead ECG isn’t sufficient for this type of information. So, a false negative or a false positive from the Apple Watch can provide incorrect reassurance or unfortunate anxiety that is dangerous. Who’s going to communicate this information to the unsuspecting Apple Watch buyer? My guess is relatively no one.

Another doctor made this ironic observation when it comes to the false positives the Apple Watch will produce:

You can just imagine the Apple Watch template in an EHR system. I wonder if it will include an Apple Watch education sheet. Maybe the EHR could send that education sheet to their watch instead of the portal. Wishful thinking…I know.

Another doctor made this poignant observation about the announcement:

We could go on for a while about prevention versus diagnosis. However, I don’t think it’s really an either or proposition. Prevention is great, but detection and diagnosis are as well since we can’t prevent everything.

This MD/PhD student summed up where we’re at with these consumer health devices really well:

I agree completely. The Apple Watch is directionally good, but still far away from really making a significant impact on health and/or our healthcare sysetm.

Execs Say Silicon Valley Has The Jump On Healthcare Innovation

Posted on September 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lately, it’s begun to look as though the leading lights of Silicon Valley might bring the next wave of transformation to healthcare. But can they work big changes in the industry on their own, or are they more likely to succeed by throwing their extremely considerable muscle behind existing healthcare players? That’s one of the many questions at issue as companies like Google, Amazon (Yes, I know they’re in Seattle), and Facebook shoulder their way into the business.

According to a new survey by Reaction Data, many healthcare execs think Amazon, in particular, has the potential to change the game.  When asked which outside entrants were most likely to disrupt the healthcare industry, two-thirds of respondents said the that the online retailing giant topped the list. “Amazon is ahead of the game in many ways compared to the other companies,” a chief nursing officer told Reaction Data.

There’s little doubt that there’s an opening for a company like Amazon to solve some pressing problems. As an industry outsider – unless you count its recent big-ticket acquisition of PillPack, which happened about a minute ago – Amazon may be able to bring fresh eyes to some of healthcare’s biggest problems. For example, what health exec wouldn’t kill to benefit from the e-retailer’s immense logistics capabilities? The mind boggles.

Facebook and Google aren’t making as many healthcare headlines, but they too are moving carefully into the business. For example, consider Google’s partnership with Stanford aimed at creating digital scribes. The digital scribe initiative may not seem like much, but I wouldn’t underestimate what Google can learn from the effort and how effectively it can operationalize this knowledge. It isn’t 2010 anymore, and I think the search giant has come a long way since its Google Health PHR effort collapsed.

Facebook, too, has made some tentative steps toward building a healthcare business, such as its recent agreement to collaborate with the NYU School of Medicine on speeding up MRI scanning using AI. The social networking giant hasn’t shown itself capable of much diversification to date, but I wouldn’t count it out, if for no other reasons than the massive profits to be made. Even for Facebook, we’re talking about serious money here.

If you’re wondering what these companies hope to accomplish, it’s not surprising. There are so many possibilities. One place to start is rethinking the EHR. Maybe I’m a starry-eyed dreamer, but I agree with observers like Dale Sanders, an executive with HealthCatalyst, who argues that Silicon Valley disrupters might be poised to bring something new to the table. “I keep hoping that the Googles, Facebooks and Amazons of the world will quietly build a new generation EMR,” Sanders writes in a recent column.

EMR transformation is just one of many potential targets of opportunity for the Silicon Valley gang, though. There’s obviously a raft of other goals healthcare leaders might like to see realized, The truth is, though, that it matters less what the Silicon Valley giants do than the competitive scramble they kick off within the industry. Even if these behemoths never succeed in leading the charge, they’re likely to spur others to do so.

Video Games and Healthcare IT – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 11, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/14 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from @HealthcareScene on the topic of “Video Games and Healthcare IT“.
I’ve been thinking a lot about the #HITsm chat and it’s evolution since the beginning. As my colleague Colin Hung knows, I’ve long been asking what the future of the chats will be and what’s the value the community can receive from these chats. I’ll admit that I’m still not sure all the answers to those questions, so I’d love to hear your thoughts.

With that said, I do think Twitter chats have been great for two things: connections and learning.

I think the #HITsm chat has served me and many in the community well on both accounts. In the beginning, Twitter chats were an excellent way for us to discover and connect with new and interesting people who were working in the field of healthcare IT. No doubt many of us found hundreds of new friends who were as passionate about the user of technology in healthcare as us. It was an amazing thing and provided so much value to everyone involved. This led to in person meetups that took all of those connections to new levels.

While this still happens today, there is a bit of a diminishing returns that happens now that so many of us know each other so well both online and in person. I’ll be interested to see how this evolves since we still do get new people who join these chats, but even then I wonder how they feel entering a community that kind of already knows each other.

The other clear goal from Twitter chats is learning. It’s always great to take part in a topic where so many experts come together and share knowledge. However, is this the best way to learn? Is there a way we could leverage the community more for learning? Is there a way we could involve more experts to increase the learning and sharing even more? These are all open questions that I’m trying to figure out and would love your thoughts.

As I thought about these things, one thing I realized is that some of the best parts of Twitter chats is connecting around common pieces of humanity. Things like travel, music, geek stuff, and food were always tangential topics that often revealed a different side of people in the community. I loved these tangents (as many people likely realized) because it created a new type of connection with someone in the community. Long story short, I wondered if we could create more of this type of interaction to strengthen bonds in the community in ways we couldn’t plan.

That’s the genesis of this week’s #HITsm chat. Let’s talk about a topic that no doubt many in the community know and love: video games. Most of us have gone through multiple generations of video games. Let’s spend some time sharing some nostalgic moments from video games to connect with others in the community. Then, we’ll also look at how our experience with video games could inform our work in healthcare IT.

We hope you’ll join us for this week’s #HITsm chat on video games. I’m sure we have some passionate memories that will be shared and possibly some new ideas and perspectives on how we can make healthcare better.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What was your first video game system? How’d you get it? What games did you have? #HITsm

T2: Name your top 5 video games and why you loved them. Any memories or special moments with those video games are welcome too. #HITsm

T3: What did video games teach you (good or bad)? #HITsm

T4: Where would you like to see video game principles included in healthcare IT? Share some examples of how healthcare would benefit if it was more like video games. #HITsm

T5: Analogies are fun. What parallels can you draw between video game experiences and healthcare IT? #HITsm

Bonus: If you could create a special power (like they do in video games) what would it be? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #askpatients
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

International Healthcare: Standards, Patients, and Personal Experiences – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 6, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/7 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Jessica Maxine Selby (@JessMSelby) on the topic of “International Healthcare: Standards, Patients, and Personal Experiences“.

Jess Maxine Selby considers herself a Global Citizen. Living in 4 countries over 3 continents and traveling to over 26 countries in 26 years, this accident-prone marketer has personally experienced what many countries healthcare system has to offer. Due to her passion for community service and a two-week adventure with Global Medical Brigades in Ghana, Jess chose to direct her career path towards the healthcare market.

Now she spearheads the marketing department at Info World, the first niche e-health company in Romania. Established in 2000, Info World is a leader in the Romanian healthcare market supplying software solutions to both the private and public sector, resulting in a markets share of over 40% of the country’s hospital beds. Alongside their primary partners MedicaSoft in the United States, and with contracts in England, South Africa, Venezuela and beyond, Info World brings a wealth of experience to the global healthcare sphere. From complying with international standards and security protocols to hands-on implementation experience with doctors and in hospitals, Info World has offered efficient and effective solutions that cross borders and cultures to supply complete e-health solutions.

Considering the fact that cross-cultural communication is a daily occurrence, the ease with which we can be in a new country by morning, and the rise of migration, there are some industry standards that should be internationally recognized and accepted. In a world where standardization is dissimilar in neighbor countries and even neighboring counties, interoperability is a distant possibility in developing countries, and many of today’s deaths are due to our reaction based healthcare rather than prevention focused I ask you for your opinions. E-Health is a field of endless possibility, connection, and communication; what do you dream of doing and how would you positively impact the current state of health worldwide?

We hope you’ll join us for this week’s #HITsm chat on International Healthcare.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Have you had any personal experiences as a patient with international healthcare? If so, tell us about them! #HITsm

T2: What do you consider to be some of the biggest healthcare issues globally? Both in developing countries and developed ones. #HITsm

T3: If one worldwide healthcare system were possible, what are some capabilities you would want to see present? #HITsm

T4: Have you personally or professionally seen any changes since the E.U.’s GDPR went into action on May 28th, 2018? #HITsm

T5: Do you see any positive or negative ways we can impact healthcare on a global scale? #HITsm

Bonus: If you could travel to any international health IT conference, which would you attend? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
9/14 – Healthcare Lessons Learned from Video Games
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy) from @HealthcareScene

9/21 – Human Centered Design in Healthcare #PatientsMatter
Hosted by Jen Horonjeff (@jhoronjeff) from @Savvy_Coop

9/28 – How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare?
Hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox

10/5 – TBD
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

HIPAA Breach Investigations – What You Should Know

Posted on September 5, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Moazzam Adnan Raja, Vice President of Marketing at Atlantic.Net.

Correctly handling a HIPAA breach recovery will benefit from a well-prepared and systematic approach. Investigation is one of a few key elements to consider, alongside speed, notification, and risk assessment. The specific issue of time deserves closer examination, as does the incorporation of risk management and auditing processes.

4 pillars of HIPAA breach response

Here are four key elements or pillars of a strong HIPAA breach response, a framework provided by Brach Eichler healthcare attorney Lani M. Dornfeld, that can be helpful in guiding your own response, as well as setting expectations with your healthcare hosts and other business associates:

Speed – Moving rapidly in response to a breach is fundamental to limiting the damage. Put together an investigation and response team, which should include the HIPAA security officer and HIPAA privacy officer, along with an attorney as necessary. You may want to standardly include your attorneys, along with members of a HIPAA compliance committee, if your organization is larger and requires more sophisticated oversight. The board of trustees and board of directors could also be included.

Investigation – The way that an investigation is conducted will depend heavily on the nature and scope of the breach. There is, of course, the issue of responsibility to patients but also liability to the organization. For the latter, Dornfeld noted, “If cloaking the investigation in the attorney-client privilege will be to your strategic advantage, then you will need to be counseled about how to manage the flow of information to maintain the privilege.” Breaches often occur because of internal errors by your staff, such as disclosure without proper authorization (e.g., telling a friend confidential patient information) or accidental disclosure to the incorrect party (e.g., sending a letter to the wrong address). Incredibly, insiders are responsible for more than half (58%) of healthcare breaches impacting electronic protected health information (ePHI), per a study released in March by Verizon. When breaches occur due to the insider threat, at the minimum, you want to conduct private interviews with relevant parties, with another person there to assist in asking questions and determining perceived honesty. Beyond what you are able to glean from interviews, it will also help to get any supporting evidence – which may include copies of social media posts, letters, or emails, as well as information from the data system. (Related to investigation, see the discussion of time below.)

Notification – Letting all pertinent parties know about healthcare data breaches is critical. Notification should occur quickly and always within 60 days of breach discovery (unless advised by law enforcement that notification would problematize its own investigations), per the Breach Notification Rule. When you notify patients or others that ePHI has been exposed, your communications should be clearly worded. They should mention the specific data involved (such as lab results or Social Security numbers) and the steps the company is taking toward investigation and mitigation. It should also let the patient know what protective steps they can personally take, along with how to get further details or ask questions.

Risk assessment – After the investigation is finished, you and the legal team can use the insight from it, along with whatever you have already done toward mitigation, to conduct a HIPAA-compliant risk assessment. The risk analysis parameters from the HHS explain that a full assessment should be conducted related to any threats to the availability, integrity, and confidentiality of health data. The HHS notes that the risk analysis is an important basis of information since it can be used to guide what is considered a “reasonable and appropriate” step (the determining factor for a HIPAA-compliant approach). While HIPAA is flexible on many parameters, it mandates that risk assessments be performed routinely (related to all ePHI systems) when contracting with new business associates (related to that specific information), and when security incidents occur (related to that specific information). Any access to ePHI that is disallowed by the Privacy Rule’s subpart E must be disallowed. Any time at which health data is accessed or used in a way that is noncompliant with those guidelines will be assumed breaches – except if your risk assessment can show that there is, in fact, low likelihood of a compromise. (Related to risk assessment, see the section on risk management and audits below.)

The specific issue of time

Time should be central to investigations, as indicated by Mayer Brown healthcare attorney Laura Hammargren. There is disagreement over whether the moment of discovery of a breach should be considered the moment when you reveal a potential breach or the moment when you have finished assessing the situation and understand what occurred.

While there may still be some debate related to discovery, the law is clear at least on the parameter of 24 hours. Discovery of a breach of ePHI occurs “as of the first day on which the breach is known to the organization, or, if exercising reasonable diligence would have been known to the organization,” noted Dornfeld.

Security events are common in which it is unclear if data was compromised or not. It can take a significant amount of time to confirm whether a breach occurred, and exactly how it might have occurred. Some means of assault are incredibly complex. Attackers may make it extraordinarily challenging to track their moves – in which case it can be a painstaking task to find out the data that they possibly accessed and removed.

Another concern of a HIPAA breach investigation is figuring out the length of time the intruder had access, which can have a huge influence on the breadth of the breach.

Risk management & audits

The risk assessment is part of the larger picture of risk management. When you are approaching a healthcare data breach investigation, you will benefit from comprehensive risk management and auditing processes. Through these safeguards, you will be much readier to send out notifications promptly, as well as to give clear information to police and other law enforcement officials.

Risk management is simplified when you have strong business associate agreements (BAAs), through which your standards can extend to third parties. By working with established, next-generation, HIPAA compliant cloud storage provider, you will have peace-of-mind that risks are properly controlled, backed by third-party certifications and audits.

Atlantic.Net is a proud sponsor of EMRandHIPAA.com. Atlantic.Net provides HIPAA compliant hosting, backed by 100% uptime guarantee.

About Moazzam Adnan Raja
Moazzam Adnan Raja has been the Vice President of Marketing at Atlantic.Net for 14 years. During Raja’s tenure, the Orlando-based, privately held hosting company has grown from having a primarily regional presence to garnering and developing attention nationwide and internationally. In collaboration with a skilled and dedicated team, Raja has successfully led a full spectrum of marketing campaigns, as well as handling PR work with major news outlets and the formation of key strategic alliances.

Does NLP Deserve To Be The New Hotness In Healthcare?

Posted on August 30, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lately, I’ve been seeing a lot more talk about the benefits of using natural language processing technology in healthcare. In fact, when I Googled the topic, I turned up a number of articles on the subject published over the last several weeks. Clearly, something is afoot here.

What’s driving the happy talk? One case in point is a new report from health IT industry analyst firm Chilmark Research laying out 12 possible use cases for NLP in healthcare.

According to Chilmark, some of the most compelling options include speech recognition, clinical documentation improvement, data mining research, computer-assisted coding and automated registry reporting. Its researchers also seem to be fans of clinical trial matching, prior authorization, clinical decision support and risk adjustment and hierarchical condition categories, approaches it labels “emerging.”

From what I can see, the highest profile application of NLP in healthcare is using it to dig through unstructured data and text. For example, a recent article describes how Intermountain Healthcare has begun identifying heart failure patients by reading data from 25 different free text documents stored in the EHR. Clearly, exercises like these can have an immediate impact on patient health.

However, stories like the above are actually pretty unusual. Yes, healthcare organizations have been working to use NLP to mine text for some time, and it seems like a very logical way to filter out critical information. But is there a reason that NLP use even for this purpose isn’t as widespread as one might think? According to one critic, the answer is yes.

In a recent piece, Dale Sanders, president of technology at HealthCatalyst, goes after the use of comparative data, predictive analytics and NLP in healthcare, arguing that their benefits to healthcare organizations have been oversold.

Sanders, who says he came to healthcare with a deep understanding of NLP and predictive analytics, contends that NLP has had ”essentially no impact” on healthcare. ”We’ve made incremental progress, but there are fundamental gaps in our industry’s data ecosystem– missing pieces of the data puzzle– that inherently limit what we can achieve with NLP,” Sanders argues.

He doesn’t seem to see this changing in the near future either. Given how much money has already been sunk in the existing generation of EMRs, vendors have no incentive to improve their capacity for indexing information, Sanders says.

“In today’s EMRs, we have little more than expensive word processors,” he writes. “I keep hoping that the Googles, Facebooks and Amazons of the world will quietly build a new generation EMR.” He’s not the only one, though that’s a topic for another article.

I wish I could say that I side with researchers like Chilmark that see a bright near-term future for NLP in healthcare. After all, part of why I love doing what I do is exploring and getting excited about emerging technologies with high potential for improving healthcare, and I’d be happy to wave the NLP flag too.

Unfortunately, my guess is that Sanders is right about the obstacles that stand in the way of widespread NLP use in our industry. Until we have a more robust way of categorizing healthcare data and text, searching through it for value can only go so far. In other words, it may be a little too soon to pitch NLP’s benefits to providers.

Report Says EHR Usability Tests Should Focus On Common Safety Threats

Posted on August 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

The American Medical Association and health system operator MedStar Health have published a report laying out a set of proposals designed to improve EHR safety. The report, which is also backed by The Pew Charitable Trusts, looks at ways that use of EHR usability can fail to prevent or even lead to patient harm.

As readers will know, to meet certification criteria EHRs currently need to conform with EHR usability requirements established in 2015. Developers need to document how they meet clinician needs and conduct formal usability testing addressing clinicians’ efficiency, effectiveness and satisfaction in using the system.

Unfortunately, the current generation of certification standards don’t focus specifically on high-prevalence safety hazards, which may mean that the process doesn’t address how usable some important EHR features are, the report says. Plus, even the earlier versions didn’t do much in regards to usability.

Over time, of course, both EHR developers and providers have begun to take these issues more seriously, and as the paper points out, are moving beyond the minimum required to meet certification standards.

For example, developers have agreed to review safety incidents with patient safety officers and product users, along with sharing such information across healthcare facilities. Also, providers have taken their own steps in this direction, such as protecting EHR safety surveys or establishing safety teams tasked with identifying EHR-related problems. As we all know, however, there’s a lot more to be done.

To make more progress, the groups suggest, EHR developers need to design more rigorous, safety-focused test cases. While they already need to run such real-world-oriented test cases, which are required for certification, but these studies might not be looking for the right things, the report says.

To be truly useful, these test cases should represent the expected uses of the technology; should represent a clinically-oriented goal with clear measures of success and failure; test known areas of risk and efficiency; and address a defined audience.

The paper also includes a list of criteria developers and providers can use to boost EHR usability and safety across the system’s entire lifecycle. For providers, this includes establishing a culture of safety which will support EHR-based safety efforts; seeing that user needs and product capabilities are aligned; customizing and configuring the system to meet those needs; implementing and maintaining the EHR carefully; and training clinicians to use the product safely and effectively.

Not surprisingly, research on these topics is ongoing, but some providers are more engaged than others. I was interested to see that MedStar Health’s National Center for Human Factors  in Healthcare continues to work with the AMA on these issues. For example, about two years ago the partners released a joint framework designed to rank EHR usability. (The partners also use the framework to rank the usability of several widely-implemented systems, including that Allscripts and McKesson were doing the best job at the time. That was fun.)

I hope to see more work on the links between EHR usability and safety in the future, as well, of course, as feedback on how to address both. We simply don’t spend enough time on this subject.