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2018 Thrival Festival. Are We Asking the Right Questions?

Posted on September 26, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Presentations in a botanical garden. Workshops in an actual work shop. Disco in a museum. The 2018 Thrival Festival eschewed tradition and challenged attendees to ponder: Are we asking the right questions when it comes to humanity + technology + art?

The annual Thrival Festival held in Pittsburgh PA is truly unique. It combines art, technology, philosophy, music, and yes, even healthcare, into an event that is part science fair and part theatre. Instead of holding the event in a traditional auditorium or hotel, the organizers chose the beautiful Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens as the setting for this year’s event.

Rising like a glass armadillo out of lush grass splashed here and there with colorful flowers, the Conservatory welcomed attendees with a warm scent of green leaves and rich earth. It was immediately apparent we were in for something different as we passed through the mammoth glass entryway and wound our way through the maze of monarchs and waterfalls to reach the main session room.

With sunshine and mother nature as a backdrop, Thrival kicked off with a keynote from John Battelle @johnbattelle, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of WIRED. Battelle wasted no time in setting the tone for the day. Early in his presentation he put up the following picture from National Geographic with the caption: What makes us human?

© Martin Schoeller/National Geographic

The image was from National Geographic’s October 125th anniversary issue (2013) where they photographed the new faces of America – a reflection of the blurring of traditional racial and ethnic lines. Battelle used the slide to highlight that society will soon be challenged to define humanity more broadly than before – as we manipulate our genes, embed technology into our bodies and program human-like qualities into robots.

Later in the morning, the issue of do-it-yourself implantable devices and pseudo-scientific injectable cocktails was discussed by a panel of experts. Dr. Rasu Shrestha @RasuShrestha was asked: Is biohacking the future of medicine? With a smile and wink, he deftly answered the question by putting forward the notion that the original healers and physicians were themselves the biohackers of their day. Instead of nanobots they used herbs and crude instruments to try and cure our pre-industrial ancestors.

*Yes, Rasu did use “OG” in his answer, to the delight of the audience.

The panel also featured Rich Lee @lovetron9000 the controversial sex technologist who not only installed a vibrating implant in himself but also recently self-injected a gene therapy that he hopes will cure him of his color blindness. Vilified by authorities, Lee was decidedly normal both on and off the stage answering questions about his motivations.

Over lunch I had the opportunity to chat with Laura Montoya, Founder of Accel:AI and Director of Women Who Code. Montoya teaches development teams to consider the ethical issues relating to AI algorithms. She posed the most interesting question of the day: Would you get into a self-driving car if you knew the algorithm governing it would choose to save the life of a pedestrian over you the passenger?

“Think of it this way,” explained Montoya. “When you sign up for a ride-sharing service, you have to agree to the company’s terms of use. Buried in that agreement is a waiver of liability. Essentially you as an individual are opting into the fact that you are okay with being driven around by a computer rather than an actual driver. The liability of the company for you is therefore limited. Now think about the pedestrian. They have not opted into the company’s self-driving car. They have not agreed that a self-driving car should be in their neighborhood. Therefore, the pedestrian represents a potentially high financial liability – being an innocent bystander. So if the car is faced with the choice of crashing into the pedestrian vs crashing into a tree, would the difference in the degree of liability influence it’s decision. And if it did, would you have knowingly gotten into the vehicle in the first place.”

*Note to self, uncheck the self-driving option from my Uber app.

My Thrival afternoon began with a short viewing of GAPPED – a documentary from Molten Media Group. The excerpt contained powerful and moving interviews of Pittsburgh residents who were in danger of being left behind by the innovation boom that the city is currently enjoying. After the screening, the producers of the film shared that they were seeking to answer a single question: Will Pittsburgh and its people have the chance to rise together or will those unwilling to adapt be left behind?

To me the film asks a much broader question: What happens when innovation wealth is unequally distributed within an ecosystem? And I don’t mean the spoils of innovation like money, equity stakes and fancy offices. What happens when public and private programs inadvertently leave out a portion of the local population? Is it fair that 95% of the innovation seed funding goes to middle-class college graduates while innovators living under the poverty line struggle to keep afloat? I can’t wait to see the entire film when it is released later this year.

I decided to end my Thrival day by attending the Moonshot Workshop led by the XPRIZE Foundation – the people behind the space competition that spawned Virgin Galactic and SpaceX. The workshop started with a short presentation by Amir Banifatemi, AI Lead at XPRIZE. Banifatemi explained the process they go through to curate, refine and define the incentive competitions that “entice the world to take action”. It turns out that it takes the team at XPRIZE over nine months to clearly define one of their challenges.

“If we define the challenge too broadly, teams become overwhelmed with where to start.” Said Banifatemi. “Problems need to be specific enough to spark the imagination but not so blue-sky that people get lost in the possibilities. If we make our challenges too difficult, we may discourage people from entering. It turns out that coming up with the right question, the right challenge is almost as hard as solving it. But if you get the question right, magic happens.

Banifatemi’s statement was the perfect bow on my day at Thrival Festival. Before innovation can happen, a problem or challenge must first exist. Once we understand that problem, our collective imaginations can be unleashed. Better definition of the problem leads to better innovation. The question of: “How can we look inside the human body?” begat X-ray machines. The more refined question of: “How can we look inside the human body without causing harm to the person and with sufficient detail to see tissue?” begat MRI machines (okay maybe a bit of a stretch, but you get the idea).

As the high-energy techno anthems from Veserium washed over me at the Thrival evening event, I found myself thinking about all the questions we are asking in healthcare. Perhaps we need to take a moment and ask ourselves if we are really asking the right ones.

2018 Health:Further Festival Format Delivers Interesting Takeaways and a Side of Fun

Posted on September 4, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

Health:Further delivered interesting takeaways from Walmart, Dell Medical School, Cerner, athenahealth & MEDITECH. The companies are bullish on data analytics, design-thinking and interoperability. Social Determinants of Health remains a challenge.

Last week, I had the chance to attend the 2018 Health:Further event (H:F) for the first time. I say event rather than conference because the latter would not do justice to the non-traditional format of the gathering in Nashville. Instead of the standard plenary+breakouts+exhibit-hall arrangement that is the norm for conferences, H:F used a music-festival approach with multiple stages in a giant exhibit hall. This was a perfect match to the unique venue – Nashville’s Music City Center.

There were four themed stages at H:F

  1. Summit of the Southeast #SOSE18 (hosted by the Tennessee chapter of HIMSS)
  2. Finances and Tokenomics (hosted by the Tennessee chapter of HFMA)
  3. Humanizing Health
  4. Clinicians and Consumers

The music-inspired multiple-stage approach allowed participants to easily and quickly move between talks. Each stage was curtained off with convenient entrances on each side of the seating area. The lack of walls and doors gave the event a dynamic and fluid feeling – with many members of the audience deciding to move to a different stage after listening to the opening statements of the session they were currently watching. Although it may have been disheartening for speakers to see people getting up to leave, in most cases there was an equal flow of people into the audience as were leaving.


Photo by AngelMD: https://twitter.com/angelMD_Inc/status/1034445725927657473

As a veteran conference attendee, I have no hesitation voting with my feet, but many others do not want to make a scene opening the heavy conference room doors. Most just stay put and check email while the speaker completes the presentation. Neither benefits in that situation and so the H:F organizers overcame this challenge by adopting the festival format.

Over the three days of the event, I had the opportunity to listen to thought-leaders from a number of high-profile companies including Walmart, HCA Healthcare, Dell Medical School, Mass Challenge, the Department of Health and Human Services, Cerner, MEDITECH, and athenahealth. From this outstanding lineup of speakers, several key interesting takeaways emerged.

Data analytics is yielding useful health insights

Marcus Osborne, Vice President of Health & Wellness Transformation at Walmart, spoke about the retail giant’s use of consumer purchasing to detect changes in people’s health. The company has done research on the buying patterns of its consumers and they have found that small changes in purchase behavior are strongly linked to changes in a person’s health. The data and linkage is so strong that it may be possible for Walmart to know about it before the person even has had a chance to go see their doctor!

I’m excited to see how retailers like Walmart, Amazon, Target, and others can impact health with this depth of data analysis.

Osborne also spoke about using data analytics to help drive down the cost of healthcare for it’s workforce by guiding people to higher efficacy treatments. Osborne used the term “appropriate care” when describing how data could be used to match employees with the best healthcare professional given that person’s unique health needs. The company estimates this could yield over $1Billion in savings.


Design will be a differentiator

Stacey Chang, Founder & Executive Director of the Design Institute for Health at UT Austin, challenged the audience to think seriously about the role of design in healthcare. He made the case that design-thinking and well-designed healthcare organizations (physically and from a process perspective) will be the winners as the system becomes more value-based and consumer driven.

Chang’s most thought-provoking takeaway was his statement: “To provoke change with technology – allowing humans to interact again”. That is, to truly affect change in healthcare, we need to work on technologies that bring people closer together and allow them to interact with each other, rather than with a computer screen.

Diversity leads to innovation

In one of several all-women panels, the topic of diversity and how different perspectives are needed to improve healthcare was discussed. One panelist spoke passionately about the need for healthcare to be more inclusive of everyone involved in care: patients, care-givers, clinicians, administrators, payors, employers, etc. Another panelist quickly added that diversity of industry and training was also needed – that healthcare would benefit from perspectives from outside the industry and from people with non-medical backgrounds like arts, philosophy and music.

EHR companies can get along (interoperability)

The most memorable (and lively) session at H:F happened on the Summit of the Southeast stage. The team at Tennessee HIMSS managed to get representatives from Cerner, athenahealth, MEDITECH and Medhost on a panel together to talk about interoperability. Right from the first question, we knew we were in for a fun ride:

Greg Meyer @Greg_Meyer93, Director and Distinguished Engineer at Cerner, created the most memorable moment on stage, hugging Evan Grossman who was representing athenahealth after Grossman emphatically stated that patients should “not be the mule that makes interoperability work”:

The panelists spoke at length about practical strategies to achieve interoperability – strategies that did not involve creating yet another standard, government regulations or financial incentives. The consensus of the panel was the EHR companies simply needed to get down to work and make their respective systems talk to one another because it’s the right thing to do.

No argument here.

SDOH remains a challenge

The final takeaway from H:F was that social determinants of health (SDOH) is slowly entering the consciousness of healthcare. More and more people are starting to realize and see that we cannot address health if we do not also address poverty, education, the lack of jobs, transit and food deserts. Unfortunately SDOH solutions are still in short supply. No one I spoke to had any solid ideas that would scale and everyone acknowledged this would continue to be a challenge over the next decade.

Special thanks to the Tennessee HIMSS organization for inviting me to the 2018 Health:Further event.

Strong Statements from Vinod Khosla at HLTH

Posted on May 16, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Last week I had the opportunity to attend a small piece of the new HLTH conference in Las Vegas. My time at the event was cut extremely short as I had to head to Science Camp with 80 5th graders (including my daughter), but I was able to hear the opening keynotes on Sunday. I was most interested in hearing from Vinod Khosla who I don’t always agree with, but he often causes me to look at something a little different or to see the future in a new way. As usual, that’s what he delivered on stage (Between pitches for his companies of course). Here’s a look at some of the pictures and tweets I shared from Vinod’s talk at HLTH.


Needless to say, HLTH was a big event. When you pour $5 million into an event, it better be big. Not to mention the marketing they did for the event. I’m glad to not see HLTH ads on every website I visit now. The turnout for the event seemed good. I saw a lot of social media people there that I know. I was surprised by how many young people were at the conference. Maybe the CEOs they reference in their marketing were a lot of startup CEOs.


This was an extremely powerful and thought provoking statement for me. His assertion is that instead of treating people based on their symptoms, the devices and sensors we use to monitor and measure our health will be so good that these health measurements will drive medicine and not the symptoms we experience. Chew on that concept for a while and you’ll see how it’s not that far fetched even if it is still a ways away.


I’m no expert on medical education, but this does bring up some challenging questions for medical schools. In many ways, it’s similar to what I feel about elementary school for my kids. Sure, there’s a baseline of knowledge that is helpful to understand. However, when it comes to diagnosis, treatment, etc, we’re going to have to seriously consider how we train future doctors. New skills are going to be required to effectively treat a patient. I can’t imagine most medical schools are going to be ready to adapt to this change.


I tweeted this after Vinod talked about all the various tests, labs, etc he’s getting. He sees it as research and suggests that it’s not something that other people should be doing. Vinod seems to have a similar view of health testing as Mark Cuban. Mark Cuban controversial suggested that those who can afford it should do regular blood tests. Opponents argue that it drives unnecessary procedures, unnecessary health fears, and plenty of other issues from over testing. I’ve always felt like there was a balance and it was important for Vinod and Mark to understand these possibilities as they test regularly. However, having this baseline of information could be extremely valuable in discovering what really influences our health.

Some pretty interesting things to think about. Is it very practical for a health IT professional? Probably not and that’s probably why I didn’t see any health IT professionals, CIOs, or other people like that at the HLTH conference. That’s not the goal of the conference really. It seems like there will be another HLTH in 2019. Will be interesting to see what vendors return and who doesn’t.

Of course, some people got distracted at HLTH by the wedding chapel:


Then again, maybe a HLTH Wedding might be a great outcome for some people.

Five Not-so-typical meetings at #HIMSS18

Posted on March 7, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

As the first day of the #HIMSS18 exhibit hall dawned, I had mentally prepared myself for a series of meetings where we would be discussing the product updates, client signings and releases of new thought-leadership content. Fortunately, the universe decided to throw a curveball and I ended up with no fewer than five meetings that were completely different than what I expected.

Meeting 1 – Nuance

I had the opportunity to sit down with Nuance at #HIMSS18. I wrote an earlier post about their #AI Marketplace and I fully expected to listen to an update on that effort plus learn details about the company’s recent announcement of a multi-year collaboration with Partners Healthcare. They surprised me by speaking instead about the importance of their work in the area of incidental findings.

Brenda Hodge, Chief Marketing Officer of Nuance Healthcare spoke passionately about the work that Nuance is doing to help ensure incidental findings are brought to the attention of primary care physicians. Through their AI prioritization algorithms and natural-language-processing capabilities, Nuance has plans to capture this potentially vital imaging information and highlight it so that the right clinical interventions can be applied sooner.

It was the fervor and fire with which Hodge spoke that was the not-so-typical part of our meeting. It was fun to share that moment with a kindred spirit, passionate about improving healthcare.

Meeting 2 – Voalte

The good folks at Voalte provided me the opportunity to do something I have never done at HIMSS – moderate a meetup. We assembled a fantastic group of panelist: @ShahidnShah @innonurse @drandrew76 and Angela Kauffman (from @Voalte) had a lively discussion about Physician Communications. The meetup was even better than I expected.

The conversation flowed easily. Online engagement was high. A good sized crowd gathered to listen. It was a fantastic way to start the day. We captured the meetup on video so watch for clips from the meetup on the Healthcare Scene YouTube channel once we recover from #HIMSSanity.

Meeting 3 – TigerConnect (Formerly Known as TigerText)

I stopped by for a quick chat with the team at TigerConnect – the company formally known as TigerText – to talk about their recent rebrand. This meeting was atypical of ones I have had at HIMSS because it was solely focused on their marketing rather than on their products. It was refreshing to have the chance to get a behind-the-scenes view of their recent rebranding initiative.

TigerText is a pioneer in the field of secure communications in hospitals and their brand had become well-established. Unfortunately the “Text” portion of their name was becoming a limitation as their company expanded into adjacent spaces and extended their platform’s capabilities. In just a few months, they made the decision to rebrand and executed it in time for #HIMSS18.

I’ll be writing a more in-depth piece on this after HIMSS, but felt it was worth mentioning because I have never had this type of frank, honest marketing conversation at HIMSS before.

Meeting 4 – Lenovo Health

I stopped by the Lenovo Health booth to see what new things were happening – especially since I had the chance to attend their HealthIT Think Tank event last year. I came for news and I ended up taking a selfie with a custom-made sign. It was energizing to just do something fun in their booth. It was 10 minutes of being creative and capturing a moment in their space. You can see how big our smiles are in the pictures we took.

Meeting 5 – Cerner

The team at Cerner reached out a few days ago and asked to get together. By pure chance, they suggested a time that had recently freed up on my calendar (one of the few open spots I had). I honestly did not read the request carefully before agreeing to it. I thought I was going to be part of a press briefing that was being broadcast. It turned out that the Cerner team wanted to me to be part of their onsite podcast.

We ended up have a wonderful conversation about Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall. It was a free-flowing discussion that I was not expecting. You can listen to the podcast here.

It was so much fun that we continued chatting for 20min after we wrapped the recording. At the end I had the opportunity to officially welcome the Cerner podcasting/social media/marketing crew to #pinksocks. Like the Lenovo Health meeting earlier, it was a rare chance to create a lasting memory. I will not soon forget that #pinksocks gifting – the enthusiasm, surprise and good feeling was just incredible.

Day 1 takeaway – small moments, lasting memories

For me, Day 1 of the HIMSS18 exhibit hall was all about creating lasting memories from small moments. It wasn’t about the big splashy announcements, but the open/honest conversation. As I reflect on the day, I can’t help but smile at the how the stars aligned to give me a day at HIMSS that is the ideal we strive for in healthcare. Imagine if all across the healthcare ecosystem, clinicians were able to have small moments with patients that were open, honest, free-flowing as well as conversational and where both left the encounter feeling energized.

We need more days like this.

Practical Health IT Innovation Conference

Posted on February 15, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

For those regular readers, you’ve probably been seeing some of the promotion we’ve been doing for a new healthcare IT conference called Health IT Expo. Yes, this is our first time hosting a healthcare IT Conference of our own, but we are in our 5th year organizing the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference. While we attend and enjoy attending ~30 healthcare IT conferences per year, we think there’s something missing in these conferences that we can address at Health IT Expo.

Hundreds of people over the years have suggested that we should host our own healthcare IT conference. I’d always resisted doing so because I didn’t want to just create another me too conference. In many ways, it felt like there were enough conferences. However, having attended hundreds of conference over the years, I realized that something really big was missing at these conferences: practical innovation.

Most healthcare IT conferences are short on practical innovation and long on useless platitudes.

Last month I wrote that Health IT Expo was the Anti Moonshot Conference. Not that there’s anything wrong with people working on moonshot ideas. That’s a lot of fun and really exciting. However, if you’re a healthcare IT professional that’s overwhelmed by operational minutiea, listening to moonshot ideas ends up leaving you empty and longing for practical innovations that can improve your work life.

Long story short, we’ll be focusing the conference on the following 5 areas of healthcare IT innovation to start:

  • Security and Privacy
  • Analytics
  • Communication and Patient Engagement
  • IT Dev Ops
  • Operational Alignment and Support

We want to take everything we’ve learned attending conferences and organizing one for 5 years and make Health IT Expo a one of a kind experience for those working in these 5 areas.

As part of this conference, we also want to extend the innovation that’s shared over the 2 day event well beyond the conference. One of the other major challenges in healthcare IT is that innovations aren’t shared between organizations. Unlike healthcare data, we don’t mind sharing innovations in healthcare IT. However, there hasn’t been a great platform for this sharing.

For example, how does an IT professional at a hospital share a unique way they implemented 1000 new virtual desktops and saved their organization time and money? The sad answer is they don’t. How does a healthcare IT professional learn about a new company that can solve their physician communication problems? In many cases they don’t.

One of our goals is to use Healthcare Scene and this new conference to create a platform for innovation sharing. As a simple example, we’re finalizing resource pages around each of the 5 topics listed above. These pages will list companies that are innovating in each spaceso they’re easy to find. I’ve been blogging for 12 years and published over 12,000 blog posts and even I was surprised by some of the companies we found. We’ll do a future post linking to those pages once they’re published.

At the end of the day, we have one major goal. How can we make healthcare IT professionals lives better so we improve healthcare?

If that goal interests you, take a minute to check out Health IT Expo. If you’re a healthcare IT professional that wants to be part of this community, reach out to us on our contact us page. Share your experience with us and we’ll give you a special discount code to attend the conference where it doesn’t break your budget.

Learning More About Samsung’s Work in Healthcare and #HIMSS16

Posted on February 29, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

This post is sponsored by Samsung Business. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

As we head into the 2016 HIMSS Annual conference, Healthcare Scene sat down with David Rhew, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head of Healthcare and Fitness at Samsung. In our discussion we talk about Samsung’s role in healthcare and the HIMSS16 conference. We also talk about a wide variety of topics including: the digital hospital, the connected home, BYOD, mobile device security, and wearables to name a few. No doubt Samsung is playing a bigger and bigger role in healthcare. Learn more in this video conversation embedded below:

After talking about Samsung Healthcare’s plans and expectations for the HIMSS16 conference, David Rhew, M.D. and Healthcare Scene opened up the floor for other live viewers to join the conversation in what we call the “After Party.”

In this discussion we talk about the challenge of standards and mobile device interoperability and then we were joined by Dr. James Legan and Dr. Charles Webster who share some first hand experiences and insights into how the right medical devices can dramatically change the physician and the patient healthcare experience along with Dr. Rhew sharing his experiences. Find out all the details in the video embedded below:

For more content like this, follow Samsung on Insights, Twitter, LinkedIn , YouTube and SlideShare

Insights, Tips, and Tricks from the #HIMSS16 Social Media Ambassadors

Posted on February 27, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we all prepared for the 2016 HIMSS Annual Conference in Las Vegas, NV, a number of the HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors got together to offer their insights into how to get the most out of the conference . A big thanks to Michael Gaspar and the HIMSS Social Media team for bringing together the HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors. If you’ve never been to HIMSS or if you’re a long time veteran of the conference, this video will give you some insights on how to make the most of the conference and what to expect at HIMSS 2016.

Learn more about the HIMSS Social Media Ambassadors and enjoy this discussion about HIMSS 2016: