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How Do You Make Health Data Useful to Individuals?

Posted on May 2, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The healthcare world is flush with data and every health system seems to have a portal to access some of that data. However, far too often that data sits unused and never becomes useful for patients. At the #HIMSS18 conference, Healthcare Scene talked with Mike O’Neill, Chief Executive Officer at MedicaSoft, and Randy Farmer, Chief Operating Officer at Delaware Health Information Network (DHIN) to talk about their unique approach to the personal health record and how access to this data is beneficial to patients.

Mike and Randy address the questions of whether DHIN members find access to their data useful and in which ways they find it useful. We talk about HIE sustainability and how a proper patient portal that provides value to patients is one important element to becoming sustainable. If you want to learn more about how technology can help make data useful to individual patients, watch the video interview below:

What do you think of Medicasoft and DHIN’s approach? Do you wish more healthcare organizations and HIEs should be working similar to this? Is there something holding them back? Why haven’t most organizations embraced new technology and patient access to data? Please share your thoughts in the comments or on Twitter with @HealthcareScene and @MedicaSoftLLC

Want to find more great healthcare IT interviews, be sure to subscribe to Healthcare Scene on YouTube or peruse all of Healthcare Scene’s video interviews.

*Medicasoft is a sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

More Ways AI Can Transform Healthcare

Posted on April 25, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

You’ve probably already heard a lot about how AI will change healthcare. Me too. Still, given its potential, I’m always interested in hearing more, and the following article struck me as offering some worthwhile ideas.

The article, which was written by Humberto Alexander Lee of Tesser Health, looks at ways in which AI tools can reduce data complexity and detect patterns which would be difficult or even impossible for humans to detect.

His list of AI’s transformative powers includes the following:

  • Identifying diseases and providing diagnoses

AI algorithms can predict when people are likely to develop heart disease far more accurately than humans. For example, at Google healthcare technology subsidiary Verily, scientists created an algorithm that can predict heart disease by looking at the back of a person’s eyes and pinpoint early signs of specific heart conditions.

  • Crowdsourcing treatment options and monitoring drug response

As wearable devices and mobile applications mature, and data interoperability improves thanks to standards such as FHIR, data scientists and clinicians are beginning to generate new insights using machine learning. This is leading to customizable treatments that can provide better results than existing approaches.

  • Monitoring health epidemics

While performing such a task would be virtually impossible for humans, AI and AI-related technologies can sift through staggering pools of data, including government intelligence and millions of social media posts, and combine them with ecological, biogeographical and public health information, to track epidemics. In some cases, this process will predict health threats before they blossom.

  • Virtual assistance helping patients and physicians communicate clearly

AI technology can improve communication between patients and physicians, including by creating software that simplifies patient communication, in part by transforming complex medical terminology into digestible information. This helps patients and physicians engage in a meaningful two-way conversation using mobile devices and portals.

  • Developing better care management by improving clinical documentation

Machine learning technology can improve documentation, including user-written patient notes, by analyzing millions of rows of data and letting doctors know if any data is missing or clarification is needed on any procedures. Also, Deep Neural Network algorithms can sift through information in written clinical documentation. These processes can improve outcomes by identifying patterns almost invisible to human eyes.

Lee is so bullish on AI that he believes we can do even more than he has described in his piece. And generally speaking, it’s hard to disagree with him that there’s a great deal of untapped potential here.

That being said, Lee cautions that there are pitfalls we should be aware of when we implement AI. What risks do you see in widespread AI implementation in healthcare?

Designing for the Whole Patient Journey: Lumeon Enters the US Health Provider Market

Posted on April 23, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Lots of companies strive to unshackle health IT’s potential to make the health care industry more engaging, more adaptable, and more efficient. Lumeon intrigues me in this space because they have a holistic approach that seems to be producing good results in the UK and Europe–and recently they have entered the US market.

Superficially, the elements of the Lumeon platform echo advances made by many other health IT applications. Alerts and reminders? Check. Workflow automation? Check. Integration with a variety of EHRs? Of course! But there is something more to Lumeon’s approach to design that makes it a significant player. I had the opportunity to talk to Andrew Wyatt, Chief Operating Officer, to hear what he felt were Lumeon’s unique strengths.

Before discussing the platform itself, we have to understand Lumeon’s devotion to understanding the patient’s end-to-end experience, also sometimes known as the patient journey. Lumeon is not so idealistic as to ask providers to consider a patient’s needs from womb to tomb–although that would certainly help. But they ask such questions as: can the patient physically get to appointments? Can she navigate her apartment building’s stairs and her apartment after discharge from surgery? Can she get her medication?

Lumeon workflow view

*Lumeon workflow view

Such questions are the beginning of good user experience design (UX), and are critical to successful treatment. This is why I covered the HxRefactored conference in Boston in 2016 and 2017. Such questions were central to the conference.

It’s also intriguing that criminal justice reformers focus attention on the whole sequence of punishment and rehabilitation, including reentry into mainstream society.

Thinking about every step of the patient experience, before and after treatments as well as when she enters the office, is called a longitudinal view. Even in countries with national health care systems, less than half the institutions take such a view, and adoption of the view is growing only slowly.

Another trait of longitudinal thinking Wyatt looks for is coordinated care with strong involvement from the family. The main problem he ascribed to current health IT systems is that they serve the clinician. (I think many doctors would dispute this, saying that the systems serve only administrators and payers–not the clinician or the patient.)

Here are a couple success stories from Wyatt. After summarizing them, I’ll look at the platform that made them possible.

Alliance Medical, a major provider of MRI scans and other imaging services, used Lumeon to streamline the entire patient journey, from initial referral to delivery of final image and report. For instance, an online form asks patients during the intake process whether the patient has metal in his body, which would indicate the use of an alternative test instead of an MRI. The next question then becomes what test would meet the current diagnostic needs and be reimbursed by the payer. Lumeon automates these logistical tasks. After the test, automation provided by the Lumeon platform can make sure that a clinician reviews the image within the required time and that the image gets to the people who need it.

Another large provider in ophthalmology looked for a way to improve efficiency and outcomes in the common disease of glaucoma, by putting images of the eye in a cloud and providing a preliminary, automated diagnosis that the doctor would check. None of the cloud and telemedicine solutions covered ophthalmology, so the practice used the Lumeon platform to create one. The design process functioned as a discipline allowing them to put a robust process for processing patients in place, leading to better outcomes. From the patient’s point of view, the change was even more dramatic: they could come in to the office just once instead of four times to get their diagnosis.

An imaging provider found that they wasted 5 to 10 minutes each time they moved a machine between an upper body position and a lower body position. They saved many hours–and therefore millions of dollars–simply by scheduling all the upper body scans for one part of the day and all lower body scans for another. Lumeon made this planning possible.

In most of the US, value-based care is still in its infancy. The longitudinal view is not found widely in health care. But Wyatt says his service can help businesses stuck in the fee-for-service model too. For example, one surgical practice suffered lots of delays and cancellations because the necessary paperwork wasn’t complete the day before surgery. Lumeon helped them build a system that knew what tests were needed before each surgery and that prompted staff to get them done on time. The system required coordination of many physicians and labs.

Another example of a solution that is valuable in fee-for-service contexts is creating a reminder for calling colonoscopy patients when they need to repeat the procedure. Each patient has to be called at a different time interval, which can be years in the future.

Lumeon has been in business 12 years and serves about 60 providers in the UK and Europe, some very large. They provide the service on a SaaS basis, running on a HIPAA-compliant AWS cloud except in the UK, where they run their own data center in order to interact with legacy National Health Service systems.

The company has encountered along the way an enormous range of health care disciplines, with organizations ranging from small to huge in size, and some needing only a simple alerting service while others re-imagined the whole patient journey. Wyatt says that their design process helps the care provider articulate the care pathway they want to support and then automate it. Certainly, a powerful and flexible platform is needed to support so many services. As Wyatt said, “Health care is not linear.” He describes three key parts to the Lumeon system:

  1. Integration engine. This is what allows them to interact with the EHR, as well as with other IT systems such as Salesforce. Often, the unique workflow system developed by Lumeon for the site can pop up inside the EHR interface, which is important because doctors hate to exit a workflow and start up another.

    Any new system they encounter–for instance, some institutions have unique IT systems they created in-house–can be plugged in by developing a driver for it. Wyatt made this seem like a small job, which underscores that a lack of data exchange among hospitals is due to business and organizational factors, not technical EHR problems. Web services and a growing support for FHIR make integration easier

  2. Communications. Like the integration engine, this has a common substrate and a multiplicity of interfaces so doctors, patients, and all those involved in the health care journey can use text, email, web forms, and mobile apps as they choose.

  3. Workflow or content engine. Once they learn the system, clinicians can develop pathways without going back to Lumeon for support. The body scan solution mentioned earlier is an example of a solution designed and implemented entirely by the clinical service on its own.

  4. Transparency is another benefit of a good workflow design. In most environments, staff must remember complex sequences of events that vary from patient to patient (ordering labs, making referrals, etc.). The sequence is usually opaque to the patient herself. A typical Lumeon design will show the milestones in a visual form so everybody knows what steps took place and what remain to be done.

Wyatt describes Lumeon as a big step beyond most current workflow and messaging solutions. It will be interesting to watch the company’s growth, and to see which of its traits are adopted by other health IT firms.

Healthcare Dashboards, Data, and FHIR

Posted on March 30, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in a dashboard society. We love our dashboards! We have mechanisms to track, analyze, and display all sorts of data at our fingertips any time of the day or night and everywhere we turn. We like it that way! Data is knowledge. Data is power. Data drives decisions. Data is king.

But what about healthcare data? Specifically, what about YOUR healthcare data? Is it all available in one place where you can easily access it, analyze it, and make decisions about your health? Chances are, it’s not. Most likely, it’s locked up inside various EHRs and many tethered (read: connected to the provider, not shareable to other providers) patient portals you received access to when you visited your doctors for various appointments. In some cases, the information that is there might not be correct. In other cases, there might not be much data there at all.

How are you supposed to act as an informed patient or caregiver when you don’t have your data or accurate data for those you are caring for? When health information is spread across multiple portals and the onus is on you to remember every login and password and what data is where for each of these portals, are you really using them effectively? Do you want to use them? It’s not very easy to connect the dots when the dots can’t be located because they’re in different places in varying degrees of completeness.

How do we fix this? What steps need to be taken? Aggregating our health information isn’t just collecting the raw data and calling it a complete record. It’s more than being able to send files back and forth. It’s critical to get your data right, at the core, as part of your platform. That’s what lets you build useful services, like a patient dashboard, or a provider EHR, or a payer analytics capability. A modern data model that represents your health information as a longitudinal patient record is key.

Many IT companies have realized HL7 FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) is the preferred way to get there and are exploring its uses for interoperability. These companies have started using FHIR to map health information from their current data models to FHIR in order to allow information exchange.

This is just the beginning, though. If you want robust records that support models of the future, you need a powerful, coherent data model, like FHIR, as your internal data model, too.  Then take it a step further and use technologies similar to those used by other enterprise scale systems like Netflix and LinkedIn, to give patients and caregivers highly available, scalable, and responsive tools just like their other consumer-facing applications. Solutions that are built on legacy systems can’t scale in this way and offer these benefits.

Our current healthcare IT environment hasn’t made it easy for patients to aggregate their health information or aggregated it for them. If we want to meet the needs of today and tomorrow’s patients and caregivers, we need patient-centric systems designed to make it easy to gather health information from all sources – doctors, hospitals, laboratories, HIEs, and personal health devices and smartphones.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Hopes for Big Impact from Validic: Making Use of Consumer Device Data

Posted on March 20, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

Validic, a company that provides solutions in data connectivity to health care organizations, came to HIMMS this year with a new platform called Impact that takes a big step toward turning raw data into actionable alerts. I talked to Brian Carter, senior vice president of product at Validic, about the key contributions of Impact.

Routinely, I find companies that allow health-related monitoring in the home. Each one has a solution it’s marketing to doctors: a solution reminding patients to take their meds, monitoring vital signs for diabetes, monitoring vital signs for congestive heart failure, or something else fairly specific. These are usually integrated solutions that provide their own devices. The achievement of Validic, built through years of painstakingly learning the details of almost 400 different devices and how to extract their data, is to give the provider control over which device to use. Now a provider can contract with some application developer to create a monitoring solution for diabetes or whatever the provider is tracking, and then choose a device based on cost, quality, and suitability.

Validic’s Impact platform actually does many of the things that a third-party monitoring solution can do. But rather than trying to become a full solutions provider for such things as hospital readmissions, Validic augments existing care management systems by integrating its platform directly into the clinical workflow. With Impact, clinicians can draw conclusions directly from the data they collect to generate intelligent alerts.

For instance, a doctor can request that Impact sample data from a sensor at certain intervals and define a threshold (such as blood sugar levels) at which Impact contacts the doctor. Carter defines this service more as descriptive analytics than predictive analytics. However, Validic plans to increase the sophistication of its analysis to move more toward predictive analytics. Thus, they hope in the future not just to report when blood sugar hits a dangerous threshold, but to analyze a patient’s data over time and compare it to other patients to predict if and when his blood sugar will rise. They also hope to track the all too common tendency to abandon the use of consumer devices, and predict when a patient is likely to do so, allowing the doctor to intervene and offer encouragement to keep using the device.

Validic has evolved far beyond its original mission of connecting devices to health care providers and wellness organizations. This mission is still important, because device manufacturers are slow to adopt standards that would make such connections trivial to implement. Most devices still offer proprietary APIs, and even if they all settled on something such as FHIR, Carter says that the task of connecting each device would still require manual programming effort. “Instead of setting up connections to ten different devices, a hospital can connect to Validic once and get access to all ten.”

However, interconnection is slowly progressing, so Validic needs to move up the value chain. Furthermore, clinicians are slow to use the valuable information that devices in the home can offer, because they produce a flood of data that is hard to interpret. With Impact, they can derive some immediate benefit from device data, as the critical information is elevated above the noise while still being integrated into their health records. They can contract further with other application developers to run analytical services and integrate with their health records.

Seven Types of HIMSS18 Attendees: An Exhibitor’s Perspective

Posted on March 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The HIMSSanity is over and everyone’s departed Las Vegas and headed for home (or SXSW). This year, my company was an exhibitor in Hall G at HIMSS. Our booth was on the main aisle, or “the thoroughfare” as those of us in the booth liked to call it. As such, I noticed some trends in the types of booth visits we encountered this year during HIMSS. These visits can be summed up into seven different types.

Integration on the Brain. “I need something to connect my disparate systems together.” Whether it’s EHR-to-EHR, EHR-to-other systems, PHR-to-EHR, or many Health IT combinations, there was no shortage of requests at HIMSS for a system or platform to make these connections happen more seamlessly. Inquiries about integration and connecting various technologies came up more frequently at our booth than any other topic at the show. These conversations were great for MedicaSoft because we can help them solve integration problems.

Partnership Hustle. “I make APIs, products, or provide services to complement your software offering. I think we’d make great partners.” HIMSS is certainly a place to find synergies and begin conversations for potential win-win situations for companies who want to partner together and go to market. Sometimes these meetings are the start of a perfect “meet cute.” Other times, they fall short. Either way, there are lots of folks out there with a wide variety of products and services making their rounds and searching for perfect business partners.

Swag Gatherer. “I came here for the swag.” You know this person. This person has no desire to interact with you. They’re not sure what your company does and many times they don’t care to ask. This person wants to collect as much free stuff at the conference as possible. Sometimes they are annoyed when you don’t have a giveaway. You know you’ve encountered a swag gatherer by their refusal to make eye contact and how fast they exit your booth once they’ve snatched up whatever swag or tchotchke you have to offer.

IT Spy. “I must find out what the competition is doing right now, let me pretend I’m in the market for IT products and booth hop.” We’ve all seen it. We know when it’s happening. It can be hilarious when the spying company tries to act like they are NOT doing this. It’s pretty obvious. I’m on to you. My only request? Be nice about it. We’ll show you what we have. You don’t have to be obnoxious or play dumb. We are happy to share.

Things You Don’t Need. “You really need our product or service even if you think you don’t need our product or service.” Everyone has this happen at one point or another. Someone comes by and really wants to sell you something you don’t need. Sometimes they politely go on their way. Other times they linger on, refusing to acknowledge that you don’t need their product or service. Sometimes being upfront doesn’t help and they continue to launch into their sales pitch anyway. You have to give these folks credit, they really are trying to sell.

Neighborhood Friendly Booth Staff or First-time HIMSS-goer. “I just thought I’d say hello.” This could be neighboring booth staff coming over to say hello. It could also be an exhibitor or attendee who’s there for the first time. In either case, these are friendly people who want to ask questions. They are getting their bearings for the show and trying to learn as much as possible. Many times they ask for advice or directions.

Match Made in Heaven. “We’re looking to buy or replace our patient portal, PHR, EHR, or integration platform.” The crème de la crème of conference attendees. This person has done their research. They know what they want and what they want is what you offer! These types of meetings leave you jazzed for the rest of the conference and eager for post-conference follow-up. This type of conference attendee actually answers your emails and phone calls when you follow-up because they have a genuine interest in what you do and how you can help them solve their IT problems or challenges.

HIMSS18 exhibitors and attendees, what other types of booth attendees did you see this year at the show?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

New Study Suggests That HIEs Deliver Value by Aggregating Patient Data

Posted on March 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Historically, I’ve been pretty skeptical about the benefits that HIEs offer, not because the concept was flawed, but that the execution was uncertain. Toss in the fact that few have figured out how to be self-supporting financially, and you have a very shaky business model on your hands. But maybe, at long last, we’re discovering better uses for the vast amount of data HIEs have been trading.

New research by one exchange suggests that some of the key value they offer is aggregating patient data from multiple providers into a longitudinal view of patients. The research, completed by the Kansas Health Information Network and Diameter Health suggests that the Qualified Clinical Data Registries promoted by MACRA/QPP could be a winning approach.

To conduct the research, the partners extracted data from the KHIN exchange on primary care practices in which more than 50,000 patients visited toward 214 care sites in 2016 and 2017. This is certainly interesting, as most of the multi-site studies I’ve seen on this scale are done within a single provider’s network. It’s also notable that the data is relatively fresh, rather than relying on, say, Medicare data which is often several years older.

According to KHIN, using interoperable interfaces to providers and collecting near real-time clinical data makes prompt quality measure calculation possible. According to KHIN executive director Laura McCrary, Ed.D., this marks a significant change from current methods. “This [approach is in stark contrast to the current model which computes quality measures from only the data in the provider’s EHR,” she notes.

FWIW, the two research partners will be delivering a presentation on the research study at the HIMSS18 conference on Friday, March 9, from 12 to 1 PM. I’m betting it will offer some interesting insights.

But even if you can’t make it to this presentation, it’s still worth noting that it emphasizes the increasing importance of the longitudinal patient record. Eventually, under value-based care, it will become critical to have access not only to a single provider’s EHR data, but rather a fuller data set which also includes connected health/wearables data, data from payer claims, overarching population health data and more. And obviously, HIEs play a major role in making this happen.

Like other pundits, I’d go so far to say that without developing this kind of robust longitudinal patient record, which includes virtually every source of relevant patient data, health systems and providers won’t be able to manage patients well enough to meet their individual patient or population health goals.

If HIEs can help us get there, more power to them.

The Real Problem with High Healthcare Costs

Posted on February 27, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

The rising cost of healthcare in the U.S. is something that nearly everyone experiences on a regular basis. Looking at the trend over the last few decades, there is an eye-opening surge in cost. There’s a great article/table by Kimberly Amadeo that outlines health care costs by year from 1960 to 2015. The cost per person for health care in 1960 was $146. In 2015, the cost per person was $9,990, over 68 times higher than it was in 1960.

The trend shows no sign of slowing; 2018 costs have only gotten higher. The National Conference of State Legislatures cited a figure from a Kaiser Employer Survey stating that annual premiums reached $18,764 in 2017. Costs for people purchasing insurance on an exchange or privately increased even more.

Increasing healthcare costs impact everyone. Why have costs gotten so high? Wasn’t the Affordable Care Act supposed to make coverage more affordable? Instead, many are faced with even higher insurance premiums for themselves and their families. Sometimes that equates to having to make difficult choices in care. And should people have to decide whether or not they can afford to seek care or treatment?

Many people want to blame insurance companies or hospitals or lobbyists or politicians. In truth, it’s a complex issue. And one of the core reasons it’s so hard to dissect is that there is a real lack of data – cost and price information, and clinical information on care quality and outcomes. Nobody has all of the data in one place. Without all of the data, the real problem or problems can’t be seen. If a problem can be guessed, it can’t be fixed. As in the Wizard of Oz, the real drivers are lurking behind the curtain; worse, the data that describes the drivers is splintered and located in different places, waiting to be collected in a way that reveals the whole truth.

How can health IT help? Are there ways that we can help solve the data problem and reduce high healthcare costs? Electronic Health Records can help gather the data. Adding claims data to complete, longitudinal patient health records can also help. Connecting PHRs, EHRs, and claims data together can help bridge the data gaps and tell more of a complete story. Until we have that story, the industry will continue to operate in siloes. Costs will continue to rise. And people will have a harder time seeking out the care they need.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Some Of The Questions I Plan To Ask At #HIMSS18

Posted on February 23, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As always, this year’s HIMSS event will feature enough noise, sound and color to overwhelm your senses for months afterward. And talk about a big space to tread — I’ve come away with blisters more than once after attending.

Nonetheless, in my book it’s always worth attending the show. While no one vendor or session might blow you away, finding out directly what trends and products generated the most buzz is always good. The key is not only to attend the right educational sessions or meet the right people but to figure out how companies are making decisions.

Below, here are some of the questions that I hope to ask (and hopefully find answers) at the show. If you have other questions to suggest I’d love to bring them with me to the show —  the way I see it, the more the merrier!

-Anne

Blockchain

Vendors:  What functions does blockchain perform in your solution and what are the benefits of these additions? What made that blockchain the best technology choice for getting the job done? What challenges have you faced in developing a platform that integrates blockchain technology, and how are you addressing them? Is blockchain the most cost-efficient way of accomplishing the task you have in mind? What problems is blockchain best suited to address?

Providers: Have you rolled out any blockchain-based systems? If you haven’t currently deployed blockchain technology, do you expect to do so the future? When do you think that will happen? How will you know when it’s time to do so? What benefits do you think it will offer to your organization, and why? Do you think blockchain implementations could generate a significant level of additional server infrastructure overhead?

AI

Vendors: What makes your approach to healthcare AI unique and/or beneficial?  What is involved in integrating your AI product or service with existing provider technology, and how long does it usually take? Do providers have to do this themselves or do you help? Did you develop your own algorithms, license your AI engine or partner with someone else deliver it? Can you share any examples of how your customers have benefited by using AI?

Providers: What potential do you think AI has to change the way you deliver care? What specific benefits can AI offer your organization? Do you think healthcare AI applications are maturing, and if not how will you know when they have? What types of AI applications potentially interest you, and are you pilot-testing any of them?

Interoperability

Vendors:  How does your solution overcome barriers still remaining to full health data sharing between all healthcare industry participants? What do you think are the biggest interoperability challenges the industry faces? Does your solution require providers to make any significant changes to their infrastructure or call for advanced integration with existing systems? How long does it typically take for customers to go live with your interoperability solution, and how much does it cost on average? In an ideal world, what would interoperability between health data partners look like?

Providers: Do you consider yourself to have achieved full, partial or little/no health data interoperability between you and your partners? Are you happy with the results you’ve gotten from your interoperability efforts to date? What are the biggest benefits you’ve seen from achieving full or partial interoperability with other providers? Have you experienced any major failures in rolling out interoperability? If so, what damage did they do if any? Do you think interoperability is a prerequisite to delivering value-based care and/or population health management?

What topics are you looking forward to hearing about at #HIMSS18? What questions would you like asked? Share them in the comments and I’ll see what I can do to find answers.

The Opportunity for Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) to Untangle Health Records

Posted on February 6, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

As the government’s Meaningful Use incentive program accelerated the adoption of Electronic Health Records, it also increased the use of patient portals and PHRs to meet MU patient engagement measures. You see this today when you’re offered a portal login at your doctor appointments. Other encouraging trends developed around the same time:

  1. Studies proved that engaged patients tend to exhibit more positive health outcomes at lower costs.
  2. Interest increased among patient populations to be involved in their health and wellness, including a desire to see (and even contribute to) their electronic medical records.
  3. Technology innovations flourished to support health (wearables, health devices, applications, etc.).

Despite these trends and the relative success of MU-driven deployments, the patient portal and personal health record landscape leaves much to be desired for their primary users and audience – patients. Many of these tools were created simply to satisfy MU requirements and while they do this, they don’t completely tie together patients’ complex health histories, include data from multiple providers, or travel with the patient from visit to visit. Instead, patients have many different portals – a different one from every different provider. Who wants 10 different portals? Nobody has time for that!

Patients need help assembling a single view of their health records. HIEs are unique in that they work with many different health systems, hospitals, and providers in their regions. HIEs represent an opportunity to be a true integrator of health information between providers and their patients. This can be a regional solution now, and with efforts like the Patient Centered Data Home (PCDH), there is greater opportunity for HIEs to share data across state and regional lines, further expanding their reach and extending real benefits to patients who want their data in one place.

HIEs can leverage their unique position into a meaningful benefit for patient by first creating a single patient record or universal health record (UHR). This UHR or platform works seamlessly with PHRs. By making PHRs available to providers in their exchange, they can then share health data among every provider they link up with and the connections grow from there when you add in PCDH connections in other regions and states. Once there is a platform in place that is truly interoperable, sharing data between providers, patients can start using PHRs that have useful, relevant health data from all of their providers. HIEs can then start building in other capabilities like analytics, population health, care quality metrics, and more.

A patient’s medical journey involves multiple providers and different physical locations as their lives and health evolve. Their health information – in a single, universal health record – should evolve with them. HIEs can play a significant role in making that happen.

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.