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Has Amazon Brought Something New To Healthcare Data Analytics?

Posted on November 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Amazon’s announcement that it was getting into healthcare data analytics didn’t come as a major surprise. It was just a matter of time.

After all, the retail giant has been making noises about its health IT ambitions for a while now, and its super-sneaky 1492 team’s healthcare feints have become common knowledge.

Now, news has broken that its massive hosting division, Amazon Web Services, is offering its Comprehend Medical platform to the healthcare world. And at the risk of being a bit too flip, my reaction is “so?” I think we should all take a breath before we look at this in apocalyptic terms.

First, what does Amazon say we’re looking at here?

Like similar products targeting niches like travel booking and supply-chain management, the company reports, Comprehend Medical uses natural language processing and machine learning to pull together relevant information from unstructured text.

Amazon says Comprehend Medical can pull needed information from physician notes, patient health records and clinical trial reports, tapping into data on patient conditions and medication dosage, strength and frequency.

The e-retailer says that users can access the platform through a straightforward API call, accessing Amazon’s machine learning expertise without having to do their own development or train models of their own. Use cases it suggests include medical cohort analysis, clinical decision support and improving medical coding to tighten up revenue cycle management.

Comprehend Medical customers will be charged a fee each month based on the amount of text they process each month, either $0.01 per 100-character unit for the NERe API, which extracts entities, entity relationships, entity traits and PHI, or $0.0014 per unit if they use its PHId API, which only supports identifying PHI for data protection.

All good. All fine. Making machine learning capabilities available in a one-off hosting deal — with a vendor many providers already use — can’t be wrong.

Now, let’s look coldly at what Amazon can realistically deliver.

Make no mistake, I understand why people are excited about this announcement. As with Microsoft, Google, Apple and other top tech influencers, Amazon is potentially in the position to change the way things work in the health IT sector. It has all-star brainpower, the experience with diving into new industries and enough capital to buy a second planet for its headquarters. In other words, it could in theory change the healthcare world.

On the other hand, there’s a reason why even IBM’s Watson Health stumbled when it attempted to solve the data analytics puzzle for oncologist. Remember, we’re talking IBM here, the last bastion of corporate power. Also, bear in mind that other insanely well-capitalized, globally-recognized Silicon Valley firms are still biding their time when it comes to this stuff.

Finally, consider that many researchers think NLP is only just beginning to find its place in healthcare, and an uncertain one at that, and that machine learning models are still in their early stages, and you see where I’m headed.

Bottom line, if Google or Microsoft or Epic or Salesforce or Cerner haven’t been able to pull this off yet, I’m skeptical that Amazon has somehow pole-vaulted to the front of the line when it comes to NLP-based mining of medical text. My guess is that this product launch announcement is genuine, but was really issued more as a stake in the ground. Definitely something I would do if I worked there.

Epic to Hold Startup Competition at App Orchard Conference

Posted on September 14, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I know it’s Friday and we usually do a Fun Friday post, but while this might look like a joke I assure you it’s not. Epic has recently announced to their App Orchard community that they’ll be doing a startup competition. The prize is $5k and “an opportunity to share their pitch with a senior Epic executive to get feedback and advice, and bragging rights.”

The startup competition is being held at the Epic App Orchard Conference happening Oct 24-26th at Epic’s headquarters in Verona. For those not familiar with App Orchard, it’s basically Epic’s partner program. The Founder or CEO of the startup is required to be there to be part of the Startup Pitch competition.

The contest is a little confusing because all tiers of App Orchard members are eligible to participate. However, companies don’t have to have to have an app in the app store yet. This would have been even more interesting if they opened it up outside the App Orchard community as well. However, given the short time frame to submit and then be on stage at the conference, I have a feeling this was a kind of last minute idea that they’re making happen and so they wanted to keep it simple.

Who would have thought that Epic would hold a startup competition? Is Epic finally seeing that there’s a lot of value to them and more importantly to their customers to have a more open approach to working with partners? Ok. A startup competition is a small step, but it feels like a huge one for Epic given past history.

The deadline to apply for the competition is Sep 28th, so it might be tight for companies that aren’t already a member of App Orchard to become a member and take part, but I’d be interested to hear if any company tries. I’ll be interested to hear what companies choose to take part in the competition and what ideas they pitch. Epic is currently displaying 111 apps in their App Orchard gallery.

Times are a changing at Epic. What’s next for Epic? They’re going to start acquiring companies? Let’s not get too crazy.

Are EHR Companies Difficult to Work With?

Posted on September 10, 2018 I Written By

Colin Hung is the co-founder of the #hcldr (healthcare leadership) tweetchat one of the most popular and active healthcare social media communities on Twitter. Colin speaks, tweets and blogs regularly about healthcare, technology, marketing and leadership. He is currently an independent marketing consultant working with leading healthIT companies. Colin is a member of #TheWalkingGallery. His Twitter handle is: @Colin_Hung.

There is an entrenched myth that EHR companies are difficult to partner with – more interested in up-front partner fees and revenue sharing than actually collaborating with 3rd party companies. Two companies are working hard to be different.

Early in the spring, I had a lengthy conversation with a group of vendors at HIMSS18 about partnering with EHR companies. I had stopped at a booth and somehow we got onto the topic of collaborating with EHR companies as a way to accelerate product development and sales. The person I was speaking with was very frustrated at the lack of response from three of the larger EHR companies. I’m paraphrasing, but her statement was essentially this: “All they want is to charge me their 5K partnership fee and then take 10% of everything I sell to their customer base. It’s ridiculous.”

At that point, several representatives from surrounding booths joined in our conversation. All of them had similar frustrations and shared similar stories of being shunted to the partnership team – which in their opinion was just a sales team in disguise – where they were told about all the wonderful benefits they would receive in return for an upfront partnership fee. I’m sure many Healthcare Scene readers can identify with these vendors.

This conversation stuck with me and over the spring and summer, I decided to dive deeper into the world of EHR partnerships. I wanted to know if the myths were true and I wanted to see if there were any companies that were operating differently. Over the past several months at every conference I have attended, I have made it a point to find out as much as I could about the various partnership programs and spoke with dozens of vendors who were proudly displaying partnership badges on their booths.

The good news is that there are at least two companies working hard to build a thriving partner ecosystem. The bad news is that many EHR companies do not have a well-defined partnership strategy and many vendors do not feel they are getting full value for their participation in EHR ecosystems.

One of the key things I learned is that there is a distinct difference between working with an EHR company on interoperability vs being part of their partner ecosystem. There have been many articles over the past few years about the difficulty of extracting data from EHRs in order to share it with other organizations involved in the care for patients. Headlines like “How disparate EHR systems, lack of interoperability contribute to physician stress, burnout” are common.

Many of the EHR companies I spoke with separate their interoperability efforts from their partnership programs. The ability to share data with others, they said, was not related to how well/not well they worked with 3rd party companies. So while it may be true that EHR companies have a lot of work to do on interoperability, partnership for some is something a few companies are doing well.

One company is Allscripts.

After HIMSS18, I had the opportunity to drop in on the fourth annual Allscripts Developer Summit in Chicago. I honestly did not know what to expect and I was pleasantly surprised at how intimate the event was. The rooms were smaller and had people sitting at round tables listening to presenters and asking lots of questions. The level of interaction between the speakers and the developers at the tables was refreshing to see.

Most of the attendees at the Summit were developers and product managers from companies that were Allscripts partners. Most of the discussions in the sessions and in the hallways centered around the latest APIs and FHIR initiatives.

The Summit is part of Allscript’s Developer Program (ADP). Allscripts recently announced that its ADP partners have together processed more than 4 Billion API data exchange transactions since the company started tracking it in 2013. In the announcement Tina Joros, VP and General Manager, Open Business Unit at Allscripts had this to say:

“We are trying to create a new mentality of innovation for our clients so that they view innovation as a path to improve overall workflows and connect with patients. We have made our API platform easily accessible and cost-effective for developers to use so that they can develop and test their solutions. This includes the ability for developers to use our FHIR APIs to meet regulatory requirements for our shared clients at no cost.”

I had the chance to sit down with Joros during the Summit and she shared with me that Allscripts does more than just provide access to their APIs. “We help companies with sales and marketing as well,” said Joros. “We coach partners that are new to the space how to ‘talk healthcare’. We help them craft and tell their stories to their target buyers. We spend a lot of time on the phone and in the field with our ADP partners. Our goal is to reduce the risk for clients to adopt new technology.”

With more than 8,000 registered developers in ADP, I asked Joros why so many companies had joined. “One of the key differentiators is the ADP Integrator tier of our program; most competitors have programs that make it easier to sign up for the FHIR APIs but they also have a vetting process in place to review companies for partnership,” said Joros. “In our ADP Integrator tier, however, companies can sign up immediately to access all our FHIR and proprietary API functionality – there is no wait or vetting by Allscripts and no fee to get started. The pricing model is designed so that companies only pay Allscripts when they are ready to go to market via a testing fee and usage-based fee. The ease of signing up and no fee to get started are unique in the industry.”

One company that has been very successful at working with Allscripts is Relaymed – a company that makes connectivity software that sends point-of-care test results directly into EHRs. RelayMed has been part of ADP for four years and had nothing but good things to say about the program.

“Many EHR companies have rigid cultures that actually bias them against partnerships – the ‘not invented here’ syndrome,” commented Neil Farish, CEO of Relaymed who spoke with me over the phone. “Allscripts isn’t like that. They had a vision of an open and vibrant ecosystem. That vision is ingrained into their culture and there is support right from the top. It’s become part of their DNA. If anything, senior management at Allscripts has been paying even more attention to partners this year. They are present. They interact with us. Help from their marketing & sales teams has been easy to get and really welcomed.”

The team at Relaymed has been working with the Allscripts team to tighten and improve the level of integration between their two systems. As well, the companies together are looking at ways to expand the breadth of devices that connect to Allscripts through Relaymed.

Another company that has invested in their partnership program is Cerner.

Cerner takes a different approach when working with partners. Although they have a centralized team that helps on-board partners (legal, contracting, etc), the ongoing relationship with partners is handled directly by the team/department that works most closely with that partner. Sometimes that is the Cerner sales team. Often times it is the product team. It just depends on where most of the interactions will occur.

“No partnership looks the same,” John Gresham, Senior Vice President, DeviceWorks & Interoperability at Cerner told Healthcare Scene. “So we have to ask the key question – How does that partnership bring differentiated value to the customer? We will work with partners the way that works best for our customers. That may mean embedding someone else’s solution within our solutions, co-market their solution as part of a bundle or we may simply go-to-market together.”

It was surprising to learn that a company as large as Cerner did not have a cookie-cutter approach to partnering with 3rd parties. It would have been easy for them to put in a rigid framework but instead they adapt themselves to best suit the partnership. DellEMC, Kofax and Nuance were cited by Gresham as examples of Cerner partnerships that were flourishing.

“Customers want something seamless and not just in terms of Cerner being a systems integrator for them,” continued Gresham. “They want everything to be smooth and simple – buying it, contracting it, deploying it, integrating it and supporting it. Cerner is willing to do all those things, something that isn’t common in the EHR space.”

During our conversation, Gresham repeatedly referenced Cerner’s laser focus on delivering better patient care and better outcomes – and how that focus guided their partnership decisions. In fact, that is key to attracting the attention of an internal champion at Cerner: a clear line from the product or service being offered to customer or patient benefit.

That is exactly what happened with Goliath Technologies, a provider of IT operations software that enables IT Teams to anticipate, troubleshoot and prevent infrastructure performance issues. The team at Goliath had successfully implemented their solution at a Cerner customer. That customer spoke about their experience at a Cerner event and Jay Savaiano, Senior Director of Business Development at Cerner took notice.

“It was because of Jay and his vision that Goliath got into the program,” explained Thomas Charlton, Chairman and CEO at Goliath Technologies. “He was the first person we had a conversation with and from there everything went smoothly. He was with us every step of the way and we’re still working with Jay today. But it all started because we were able to demonstrate a clear positive impact on a Cerner customer.”

“Once Cerner decided that Goliath would benefit their customers, the process of formalizing the relationship was very straightforward and smooth,” continued Charlton. “They moved really fast. They have a fantastic team of people, very competent and focused. Everyone from contracting to legal to sales was great to work with.”

Because of the success, they have enjoyed with Cerner, Goliath has begun to put a lot of focus on their partnership with Cerner. They have begun working with Cerner developers to refine and tune their combined solutions and Goliath recently hired a new VP of Corporate Development who had left Cerner a few years ago, to help strengthen the relationship [side note the VP was referred to Charlton by people at Cerner]

“Cerner brings healthcare knowledge to Goliath,” said Charlton. “They know patient care and healthcare systems management. That deep understanding of healthcare has helped us with product development. Cerner has really helped to reshape our thinking on healthcare, patient care and Healthcare IT Operations management.”

*****

It is interesting to note that neither Relaymed or Goliath were put forward by Allscripts or Cerner respectively as example partners to speak with. Both Relaymed and Goliath were referred to me by different people who are not affiliated with either EHR company.

So if you are a software provider that is looking to partner with an EHR company what can you do to attract their attention? All four individuals I spoke with offered sage advice.

Neil Farish (Relaymed): “Avoid the transactional models of partnership where it is just an exchange of $$$. Look to the value that you as a partner are getting, the value the EHR company is getting and the value you can provide together to their end-customers. If there is value all around then the fees should be dwarfed by the value. If not, then you seriously have to rethink that potential partnership.”

Thomas Charlton (Goliath): “Have a very clear understanding of how your product or service helps deliver better care to patients. Can you show a direct line to customer or patient benefit? If you can’t then you need to figure that out before approaching an EHR company looking for a partnership. Also, joint customers are important. The more joint customers you have the more momentum you will get behind the initiative.”

John Gresham (Cerner): “The key to making partnerships work is mutual respect. That’s the starting point. Next comes a key question – do you have a ‘what’s best for customers’ mindset. If you have that then we have a foundation for conversation. I would strongly encourage companies to build solutions for the highest possible reliability, scalability and security.  Cerner customers expect that. Oh, and you have to have proof points to back that up.”

Tina Joros (Allscripts): “Be persistent. Come talk to us at conferences. Connect with us online. I would encourage any company signed up for the program and does not feel like it is providing value, to speak with a member of our team and let us know.  In some cases, we can find a tier that is a better fit for the company or make introductions to other associates at Allscripts, so additional areas of the business can evaluate their solution.”

Myth busted.

Google And Fitbit Partner On Wearables Data Options

Posted on May 7, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Fitbit and Google have announced plans to work together, in a deal intended to “transform the future of digital health and wearables.” While the notion of transforming digital health is hyperbole even for companies the size of Google and Fitbit, the pairing does have plenty of potential.

In a nutshell, Fitbit and Google expect to take on both consumer and enterprise health projects that integrate data from EMRs, wearables and other sources of patient information together. Given the players involved, it’s hard to doubt that at least something neat will emerge from their union.

Among the first things the pair plans to use Google’s new Cloud Healthcare API to connect Fitbit data with EMRs. Of course, readers will know that it’s one thing to say this and another to actually do it, but gross oversimplifications aside, the idea is worth pursuing.

Also, using services such as those offered by Twine Health– a recent Fitbit acquisition — the two companies will work to better manage chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Twine offers a connected health platform which leverages Fitbit data to offer customized health coaching.

Of course, as part of the deal Fitbit is moving to the Google Cloud Platform, which will supply the expected cloud services and engineering support.

The two say that moving to the Cloud Platform will offer Fitbit advanced security capabilities which will help speed up the growth of Fitbit Health Solutions business. They also expect to make inroads in population health analysis. For its part, Google also notes that it will bring its AI, machine learning capabilities and predictive analytics algorithms to the table.

It might be worth a small caution here. Google makes a point of saying it is “committed” to meeting HIPAA standards, and that most Google Cloud products do already. That “most” qualifier would make me a little bit nervous as a provider, but I know, why worry about these niceties when big deals are afoot. However, fair warning that when someone says general comments like this about meeting HIPAA standards, it probably means they already employ high security standards which are likely better than HIPAA. However, it also means that they probably don’t comply with HIPAA since HIPAA is about more than security and requires a contractual relationship between provider and business associate and the associated liability of being a business associate.

Anyway, to round out all of this good stuff, Fitbit and Google said they expect to “innovate and transform” the future of wearables, pairing Fitbit’s brand, community, data and high-profile devices with Google’s extreme data management and cloud capabilities.

You know folks, it’s not that I don’t think this is interesting. I wouldn’t be writing about if I didn’t. But I do think it’s worth pointing out how little this news announcement says, really.

Yes, I realize that when partnerships begin, they are by definition all big ideas and plans. But when giants like Google, much less Fitbit, have to fall back on words like innovate and transform (yawn!), the whole thing is still pretty speculative. Just sayin’.

Some Of The Questions I Plan To Ask At #HIMSS18

Posted on February 23, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

As always, this year’s HIMSS event will feature enough noise, sound and color to overwhelm your senses for months afterward. And talk about a big space to tread — I’ve come away with blisters more than once after attending.

Nonetheless, in my book it’s always worth attending the show. While no one vendor or session might blow you away, finding out directly what trends and products generated the most buzz is always good. The key is not only to attend the right educational sessions or meet the right people but to figure out how companies are making decisions.

Below, here are some of the questions that I hope to ask (and hopefully find answers) at the show. If you have other questions to suggest I’d love to bring them with me to the show —  the way I see it, the more the merrier!

-Anne

Blockchain

Vendors:  What functions does blockchain perform in your solution and what are the benefits of these additions? What made that blockchain the best technology choice for getting the job done? What challenges have you faced in developing a platform that integrates blockchain technology, and how are you addressing them? Is blockchain the most cost-efficient way of accomplishing the task you have in mind? What problems is blockchain best suited to address?

Providers: Have you rolled out any blockchain-based systems? If you haven’t currently deployed blockchain technology, do you expect to do so the future? When do you think that will happen? How will you know when it’s time to do so? What benefits do you think it will offer to your organization, and why? Do you think blockchain implementations could generate a significant level of additional server infrastructure overhead?

AI

Vendors: What makes your approach to healthcare AI unique and/or beneficial?  What is involved in integrating your AI product or service with existing provider technology, and how long does it usually take? Do providers have to do this themselves or do you help? Did you develop your own algorithms, license your AI engine or partner with someone else deliver it? Can you share any examples of how your customers have benefited by using AI?

Providers: What potential do you think AI has to change the way you deliver care? What specific benefits can AI offer your organization? Do you think healthcare AI applications are maturing, and if not how will you know when they have? What types of AI applications potentially interest you, and are you pilot-testing any of them?

Interoperability

Vendors:  How does your solution overcome barriers still remaining to full health data sharing between all healthcare industry participants? What do you think are the biggest interoperability challenges the industry faces? Does your solution require providers to make any significant changes to their infrastructure or call for advanced integration with existing systems? How long does it typically take for customers to go live with your interoperability solution, and how much does it cost on average? In an ideal world, what would interoperability between health data partners look like?

Providers: Do you consider yourself to have achieved full, partial or little/no health data interoperability between you and your partners? Are you happy with the results you’ve gotten from your interoperability efforts to date? What are the biggest benefits you’ve seen from achieving full or partial interoperability with other providers? Have you experienced any major failures in rolling out interoperability? If so, what damage did they do if any? Do you think interoperability is a prerequisite to delivering value-based care and/or population health management?

What topics are you looking forward to hearing about at #HIMSS18? What questions would you like asked? Share them in the comments and I’ll see what I can do to find answers.

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on January 4, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The first part of this article set a general context for health IT in 2017 and started through the year with a review of interesting articles and studies. We’ll finish the review here.

A thoughtful article suggests a positive approach toward health care quality. The author stresses the value of organic change, although using data for accountability has value too.

An article extolling digital payments actually said more about the out-of-control complexity of the US reimbursement system. It may or not be coincidental that her article appeared one day after the CommonWell Health Alliance announced an API whose main purpose seems to be to facilitate payment and other data exchanges related to law and regulation.

A survey by KLAS asked health care providers what they want in connected apps. Most apps currently just display data from a health record.

A controlled study revived the concept of Health Information Exchanges as stand-alone institutions, examining the effects of emergency departments using one HIE in New York State.

In contrast to many leaders in the new Administration, Dr. Donald Rucker received positive comments upon acceding to the position of National Coordinator. More alarm was raised about the appointment of Scott Gottlieb as head of the FDA, but a later assessment gave him high marks for his first few months.

Before Dr. Gottlieb got there, the FDA was already loosening up. The 21st Century Cures Act instructed it to keep its hands off many health-related digital technologies. After kneecapping consumer access to genetic testing and then allowing it back into the ring in 2015, the FDA advanced consumer genetics another step this year with approval for 23andMe tests about risks for seven diseases. A close look at another DNA site’s privacy policy, meanwhile, warns that their use of data exploits loopholes in the laws and could end up hurting consumers. Another critique of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act has been written by Dr. Deborah Peel of Patient Privacy Rights.

Little noticed was a bill authorizing the FDA to be more flexible in its regulation of digital apps. Shortly after, the FDA announced its principles for approving digital apps, stressing good software development practices over clinical trials.

No improvement has been seen in the regard clinicians have for electronic records. Subjective reports condemned the notorious number of clicks required. A study showed they spend as much time on computer work as they do seeing patients. Another study found the ratio to be even worse. Shoving the job onto scribes may introduce inaccuracies.

The time spent might actually pay off if the resulting data could generate new treatments, increase personalized care, and lower costs. But the analytics that are critical to these advances have stumbled in health care institutions, in large part because of the perennial barrier of interoperability. But analytics are showing scattered successes, being used to:

Deloitte published a guide to implementing health care analytics. And finally, a clarion signal that analytics in health care has arrived: WIRED covers it.

A government cybersecurity report warns that health technology will likely soon contribute to the stream of breaches in health care.

Dr. Joseph Kvedar identified fruitful areas for applying digital technology to clinical research.

The Government Accountability Office, terror of many US bureaucracies, cam out with a report criticizing the sloppiness of quality measures at the VA.

A report by leaders of the SMART platform listed barriers to interoperability and the use of analytics to change health care.

To improve the lower outcomes seen by marginalized communities, the NIH is recruiting people from those populations to trust the government with their health data. A policy analyst calls on digital health companies to diversify their staff as well. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is also getting into the act.

Specific technologies

Digital apps are part of most modern health efforts, of course. A few articles focused on the apps themselves. One study found that digital apps can improve depression. Another found that an app can improve ADHD.

Lots of intriguing devices are being developed:

Remote monitoring and telehealth have also been in the news.

Natural language processing and voice interfaces are becoming a critical part of spreading health care:

Facial recognition is another potentially useful technology. It can replace passwords or devices to enable quick access to medical records.

Virtual reality and augmented reality seem to have some limited applications to health care. They are useful foremost in education, but also for pain management, physical therapy, and relaxation.

A number of articles hold out the tantalizing promise that interoperability headaches can be cured through blockchain, the newest hot application of cryptography. But one analysis warned that blockchain will be difficult and expensive to adopt.

3D printing can be used to produce models for training purposes as well as surgical tools and implants customized to the patient.

A number of other interesting companies in digital health can be found in a Fortune article.

We’ll end the year with a news item similar to one that began the article: serious good news about the ability of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) to save money. I would also like to mention three major articles of my own:

I hope this review of the year’s articles and studies in health IT has helped you recall key advances or challenges, and perhaps flagged some valuable topics for you to follow. 2018 will continue to be a year of adjustment to new reimbursement realities touched off by the tax bill, so health IT may once again languish somewhat.

Alexa, Can You Heal Me Now? The Power of Voice Assistant Technology in Healthcare

Posted on January 26, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

On Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) I’ll be hosting a live video interview with Nathan Treloar, President and COO at Orbita. In our discussion, we’ll be diving into voice assistant technology in healthcare including the breakout hit from Amazon known as Alexa. This has so much potential in healthcare. Join us as we talk about Alexa and other voice assistant technologies in healthcare and how more organizations can leverage voice assistant technology in their product offerings.

The great part is that you can join my conversation live and even add your own comments to the discussion or ask your own questions. All you need to do to watch live is visit this blog post on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 1:00 PM ET (10:00 AM PT) and watch the video embed at the bottom of this post or you can watch on YouTube directly. The conversation will be recorded as well and available on this post after the interview.

About Nathan Treloar
Nate Treloar is co-founder and president of Orbita, which provides the first secure (HIPAA-compliant) cloud-based platform for creating and managing digital home healthcare applications. Previously, he held key executive positions at FAST Search, Microsoft, RAMP, and, Ektron. He is a respected expert and speaker on consumer IoT trends, search, text and data mining, content management, and knowledge management and has advised hundreds of the world’s largest companies and government agencies on their applications.

We hope you’ll join us live using the video below or enjoy the recorded version of our conversation.


(To Ask Questions, visit the YouTube page)

If you’d like to see the archives of Healthcare Scene’s past interviews, you can find and subscribe to all of Healthcare Scene’s interviews on YouTube.

The Speed of Innovation in Mobile Networks – Enabling The Future of Healthcare

Posted on September 8, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I’ve been attending the CTIA Super Mobility Conference in Las Vegas today and it’s been eye opening to say the least. The efforts they’re making to make wireless networks work for the IOT (internet of things) and even things like drones is incredible. Much of the buzz at the event has also been around the coming 5G networks.

Matt Grop EVP and CTO at Qualcomm offered this comparison of the progression from voice to 4G LTE to 5G:

Later, Rajeev Suir, President and CEO of Nokia, then suggested that we need 5G networks because the applications of the future will require it. This is an interesting statement to consider. Today during my Healthcare API discussion the need for faster connections came up and illustrated how healthcare could benefit from this additional speed. In fact, the innovations in healthcare are likely going to be facilitated or even demand the faster speeds to become a reality.

Think about neural networks and genomic medicine. That type of processing isn’t going to happen on the phone. The data for those won’t be stored on your phone, laptop, or desktop. It’s going to be stored and processed in the cloud and then sent back to your phone. The exchange of data that is going to need to happen is going to be huge and we’re going to need really fast networks to enable this future.

Think about all of the sensor data that is going to be reporting up to the cloud to be processed by these neural networks and pharmacogenomic processing engines. We’re not going to plug in to transfer this data. It’s going to use these ubiquitous wireless networks that currently connect our smart phones.

This all certainly leads to a fascinating future. I love the way technology can open the door to opportunities that would have never been thought possible previously. New high speed mobile networks like 5G are an example of that. The only question is if even 5G will be fast enough.

Is Lack of Mobile Health Interoperability Holding Us Back?

Posted on August 19, 2015 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Today during the #HITChicks chat, there was a great discussion with two really amazing healthcare IT professionals, Patty Sheridan and Tamara StClaire, about the need for interoperability between mobile health apps. Here’s where it started:

Then, I pushed Tamara a bit to talk more about the subject:

What a strong and important statement from Tamara. I agree completely that we’ll miss out on so much of the value that mobile health apps can provide if we don’t find out a way for apps to share data. Interoperability of health data has been an extremely important topic. In fact, ONC has put out a 10 year plan on how to have interoperability in healthcare. However, in all of the things I’ve read about interoperability of healthcare data, they’re always talking about sharing healthcare data between healthcare providers and provider data with patients. I don’t remember anyone ever talking about sharing health data between mobile health apps. The closest I’ve seen is making the patient the HIE of one that gathers and shares data between apps.

If no ones talking about mobile health data sharing, will it ever happen? Since Tamara tweeted her comment. I’ve been trying to think of the pathway to achieve her vision of shared mobile health data between disparate applications. Will it happen? Who will make it a reality? What are your thoughts?

Cerner Wellness Integrates with Apple’s HealthKit

Posted on October 1, 2014 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

When Apple announced HealthKit, they announced a few healthcare partners including Epic. Many thought this was an interesting announcement, but I was (and still am) skeptical that anything really meaningful will come. As one person put it, we’re suppose to be excited that two of the most closed companies in the world are working together?

I recently saw the news come out that Epic’s main competitor, Cerner, announced that they’d integrated with Apple’s HealthKit. In fact, I believe their integration seems to have come out before Epic’s integration (unless I missed it, or maybe Epic just likes to keep quiet). Here’s a short excerpt from the Cerner announcement:

To me, HealthKit is about making it more convenient to manage your health and wellness, and share that information with the people that are helping you reach your goals. It’s less about trying to get real-time clinical insights or make new diagnoses. HealthyNow has the features that consumers and wellness experts are looking for in these apps, and by integrating with HealthKit, we’ve opened up the experience to a whole array of health apps for our members to choose from. This integration enables the feeding of key health metrics into our platform for sharing with health coaches, earning of incentive points, and identification of new opportunities to improve your health. By promoting healthier habits, consumers lower their premiums, health plans reduce their spend on treating avoidable diseases, and everyone lives a healthier life. (emphasis added)

The details on what Apple’s HealthKit would really do have been pretty foggy. Although, this paragraph illustrates where I figured HealthKit was going. Notice the part of the quote where I added emphasis. Cerner is just looking to suck data from HealthKit into Cerner. Maybe they have future plans to make Cerner data available to HealthKit, but the announcement seems to say they haven’t done so yet. This one way interface is exactly why I’m skeptical that HealthKit will really have a huge impact on healthcare.

What do you think? Have any of you integrated with HealthKit? I’d love to see if you have other views of where HealthKit might be headed.