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The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 9, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/12 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network (@HMNwriters) on the topic of “The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare”.

It’s time for #NursingNow. Nurses need to have a solid place at the table – from the C-Suite to Management, Entrepreneurs to Digital Health Innovators.  In collaboration with the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses, Nursing Now aims to raise the status and profile of nursing globally.  Nursing Now works to empower nurses to take their place at the heart of tackling 21st Century health challenges.

In this #HITMC chat, Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) and Janet Kennedy (@GetSocialHealth) will lead a discussion on Nurse Leadership and how every part of healthcare needs nurses to be present and actively involved.

Resources:

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Nurses have always been the backbone of healthcare. Do you think they have a large enough role in healthcare leadership? Why or why not? #HITsm

T2: Should the push to get more nurses in leadership come from nurses or other members of the healthcare team? Why do you think so? #HITsm

T3: Traditional concepts of a nurse’s role have changed over the past decade. What new career paths have you seen nurses take? #HITsm

T4: In a health system or practice setting, in what ways have nurses expanded their roles? #HITsm

T5: Nurses have been embracing entrepreneurship, both inside and outside of healthcare. What characteristics of nursing lend themselves to entrepreneurship? #HITsm

Bonus: Share your favorite nurse story. #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/19 – Government Regulations for Healthcare – Where Are We At and Where Are We Headed?
Hosted by John Lynn (@techguy)

10/26 – TBD
Hosted by @bigdatadavid13

11/2 – TBD
Hosted by TBD

11/9 – TBD
Hosted by @technursejon

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on October 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 10/5 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth) on the topic of “Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring”.

One of the most effective medical interventions to significantly improve the health of patients doesn’t require the latest technology or expensive medication but simply involves helping them take their existing medication as prescribed.

It’s not a light topic, but we believe that people can benefit from more awareness about their actual risks, as opposed to sensationalized risks that make good stories for the popular media.

  • Between 41% and 59% of mentally ill patients take their medication infrequently or not at all.
  • Examples of common non-adherence behaviors include:
    • 1 in 2 people missed a dose
    • 1 in 3 forgot if they took the med
    • 1 in 4 did not get a refill on time

Medication non-adherence is an enormous problem that is still largely unaddressed by the healthcare system, but it’s not totally out of our control. Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat as we talk about medication compliance and drug monitoring.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: In what ways has medication non-compliance affected you or anyone you know? Professional or Personal. Can be acute or episodic… #HITsm

T2: Why didn’t the patient adhere? Was there a social determinant? An issue with side effects, access or money? Possible Rx abuse? #HITsm

T3: We know communication with healthcare professionals is key in patient’s adherence and that Medication Reconciliation is gaining traction with MIPS, etc., but are providers going into this level of detail (see example) to ensure patients truly understand why they need to take the meds they are prescribed? Why or why not? #HITsm

T4: Beyond condition management, what impact do you think medication non-compliance has on society as a whole? #HITsm

T5: What ideas & thoughts do you have around strategies for improving medication compliance? Have you come across any impactful strategies or workflows? #HITsm

Bonus: What technology do you think could help with these challenges? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/12 – The Importance of Nurses in Healthcare
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Healthcare AI Could Generate $150B In Savings By 2025

Posted on September 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Is the buzz around healthcare AI solutions largely hype, or can they deliver measurable benefits? Lest you think it’s too soon to tell, check out the following.

According to a new report from market analyst firm Frost & Sullivan, AI and cognitive computing will generate $150 billion in savings for the healthcare business by 2025.  Frost researchers expect the total AI market to grow to $6.16 billion between 2018 and 2022.

The analyst firm estimates that at present, only 15% to 20% of payers, providers and pharmaceutical companies have been using AI actively to change healthcare delivery. However, its researchers seem to think that this will change rapidly over the next few years.

One of the most interesting applications for healthcare AI that Frost cites is the use of AI in precision medicine, an area which clearly has a tremendous upside potential for both patients and institutions.

In this scenario, the AI integrates a patient’s genomic, clinical, financial and behavioral data, then cross-references the data with the latest academic research evidence and regulatory guidelines. Ultimately, the AI would create personalized treatment pathways for high-risk, high-cost patient populations, according to Koustav Chatterjee, an industry analyst focused on transformational health.

In addition, researchers could use AI to expedite the process of clinical trial eligibility assessment and generate prophylaxis plans that suggest evidence-based drugs, Chatterjee suggests.

The report also lists several other AI-enabled solutions that might be worth implementing, including automated disease prediction, intuitive claims management and real-time supply chain management.

Frost predicts that the following will be particularly hot AI markets:

  • Using AI in imaging to drive differential diagnosis
  • Combining patient-generated data with academic research to generate personalized treatment possibilities
  • Performing clinical documentation improvement to reduce clinician and coder stress and reduce claims denials
  • Using AI-powered revenue cycle management platforms that auto-adjust claims content based on payer’s coding and reimbursement criteria

Now, it’s worth noting that it may be a while before any of these potential applications become practical.

As we’ve noted elsewhere, getting rolling with an AI solution is likely to be tougher than it sounds for a number of reasons.

For example, integrating AI-based functions with providers’ clinical processes could be tricky, and what’s more, clinicians certainly won’t be happy if such integration disrupts the EHR workflow already in existence.

Another problem is that you can’t deploy an AI-based solution without ”training” it on a cache of existing data. While this shouldn’t be an issue, in theory, the reality is that much of the data providers generate is still difficult to filter and mine.

Not only that, while AI might generate interesting and effective solutions to clinical problems, it may not be clear how it arrived at the solution. Physicians are unlikely to trust clinical ideas that come from a black box, e.g. an opaque system that doesn’t explain itself.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m a huge fan of healthcare AI and excited by its power. One can argue over which solutions are the most practical, and whether AI is the best possible tool to solve a given problem, but most health IT pros seem to believe that there’s a lot of potential here.

However, it’s still far from clear how healthcare AI applications will evolve. Let’s see where they turn up next and how that works out.

How Does Interoperability Affect Technology Adoption in Healthcare? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on September 25, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 9/28 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Niko Skievaski @niko_ski from @redox.

In her opening remarks at the 2nd ONC Interoperability Forum, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma set the goal of eliminating the use of fax machines in healthcare by 2020. It’s true – fax is still the most common form of communication among providers for transmission of medical records, test results, instructions, and treatment regimens all thanks to its insusceptibility to hacking. While the rest of the world is embracing digitalization and the benefits it has brought us, healthcare seemed a bit reluctant about moving on. Fax or other paper-based records are largely inconvenient and created barriers to information exchange.

In the era of artificial intelligence and machine learning, we’re generating data in an unbelievable speed – more information to process, exchange and analyze, posing bigger challenges for snail-paced interoperability progress. Tech giants see this lack of interoperability as a perfect opportunity to enter healthcare and disrupt the “broken” industry. Apple Health is promoting open API for iOS users to own their health data; Amazon’s working with multiple healthcare organizations to build its own system; and the recent interoperability pledge by the six big companies is set to transform healthcare data infrastructure.

Coming from an outsider perspective, these companies are familiar with the user authorization approach. When you sign in to an app with your Google account, you’ll be asked to grant the app access to your information through an authentication protocol called OAuth 2.0. Ideally, this is the vision for healthcare data use in the future.

But the existing healthcare data infrastructure, in the meantime, is drastically different from the one these tech giants are familiar with. Perhaps a more realistic, pragmatic approach is to work with the established stakeholders in healthcare, particularly the big EHR vendors, instead of bringing in a whole new system to solve interoperability.

Join us for this week’s #HITsm chat to discuss interoperability’s impact on technology adoption in healthcare and share your opinions on what stakeholders need to do to improve interoperability and accelerate technology adoption.

Topics for this week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are the biggest barriers to technology adoption in healthcare? #HITsm

T2: Is interoperability more challenging now with more data generated by technologies such as AI? #HITsm

T3: Will patient-authorized API access bring fundamental changes to interoperability? #HITsm

T4: How will tech giants’ move into healthcare impact interoperability? #HITsm

T5: What needs to be done by the established stakeholders in healthcare, e.g. EHR vendors, to solve interoperability? #HITsm

Bonus: What do you want as a patient when it comes to interoperability? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
10/5 – Medication Compliance & Drug Monitoring
Hosted by Joy Rios (@askjoyrios) and Robin Roberts (@rrobertsehealth)

10/12 – TBD
Hosted by Janet Kennedy (@getsocialhealth) and Carol Bush (@TheSocialNurse) from the Healthcare Marketing Network

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Applying AI Based Outlier Detection to Healthcare – Interview with Dr. Gidi Stein from MedAware

Posted on September 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

Most people who receive healthcare understand that healthcare is as much art as it is science. We don’t expect our doctors to be perfect or know everything because the human body is just too complex and there are so many factors that influence health. What’s hard for patients to understand is when obvious human errors occur. This is especially true when technology or multiple layers of humans should have caught the obvious.

This is exactly why I was excited to interview Dr. Gidi Stein, CEO and Co-founder of MedAware. As stated on their website, their goal is to eliminate prescription errors. In the interview below, you’ll learn more about what MedAware and Dr. Stein are doing to achieve this goal.

Tell us a little about yourself and MedAware.

Early in my career, I worked in the Israeli high-tech industry and served as CTO and Chief Architect of several algorithm-rich startups. However, after many years working in technology, I decided to return to school and study medicine. In 2002, I graduated from Tel Aviv University Medical School with a specialization in internal medicine, treating patients and teaching students and residents in one of Israel’s largest hospitals.

After working as a physician for several years, I heard a heartbreaking story, which ultimately served as my motivation and inspiration to found MedAware. A physician was treating a 9-year-old boy who suffered from Asthma. To treat the symptoms, the physician entered the electronic prescribing environment and selected Singulair from the drop-down menu, a standard treatment for asthma. However, unfortunately, he accidentally clicked Sintrom, an anticoagulant (blood thinner). Tragically, neither the physician, pharmacist nor parent caught this error, which resulted in the boys’ untimely death. This avoidable, medication-related complication and death was caused by a typo.

Having worked as a physician for many years, I had a difficult time understanding that with all the medical intervention and technological support we rely on, our healthcare system was not intelligent enough to prevent errors like this. This was a symptom of a greater challenge; how can we identify and prevent medication related complications before they occur? Given my combined background in technology and medicine, I knew that there must be a solution to eliminate these types of needless errors. I founded MedAware to transform patient safety and save lives.

Describe the problem with prescription-based medication errors that exists today.  What’s the cause of most of these errors?

Every year in the U.S. alone, there are 1.5 million preventable medication errors, which result in patient injury or death. In fact, medication errors are the third leading cause of death in the US, and errors related to incorrect prescription are a major part of these. Today’s prescription-related complications fall into two main categories: medication errors that occur at the point of order entry (like the example of the 9yr old boy) and errors that result from evolving adverse drug events (ADEs). Point of order entry errors are a consequence of medication reconciliation challenges, typos, incorrect dosage input and other clinical inconsistencies.

Evolving ADEs are, in fact, the bulk of the errors that occur – almost 2/3 of errors are those that happen after a medication was correctly prescribed. These are often the most catastrophic errors, as they are completely unforeseen, and don’t necessarily result from physician error. Rather, they occur when a patient’s health status has changed, and a previously safe medication becomes unsafe.

MedAware uses AI to detect outlier prescriptions.  It seems that everything is being labeled AI, so how does this work and how effective is it at detecting medication errors?

AI is best used to analyze large scale data to identify patterns and outliers to those patterns. The common theme in industries, such as aviation, cyber security and credit card fraud, is that they are rich with millions of transactions, 99.99% of which are okay. But, a small fraction of them are hazardous, and these dangers most often occur in new and unexpected ways. In these industries, AI is used to crunch millions of transactions, identify patterns, and most importantly, identify outliers to those patterns as potential hazards with high accuracy.

Medication safety is similar to these industries. Here too, millions of medications are prescribed and dispensed every day, and in 99.99% of cases, the right medication is prescribed and dispensed to the right patient. But, on rare occasions, an unexpected error or oversight may put patients at risk. MedAware analyzes millions of clinical records to identify errors and oversights as statistical outliers to the normal behavioral patterns of providers treating similar patients. Our data shows that this methodology, identifies errors and ADEs with high accuracy and clinical relevance and that most of the errors found by our system would not have been caught by any other existing system.

Are most of the errors you find obvious errors that a human could have detected but just missed or are you finding surprising errors as well?  Can you share some stories of what you’ve found?

The errors that we find are obvious errors; any physician would agree that they are indeed erroneous. These include: prescribing chemotherapy to healthy individuals, not stopping anticoagulation to a bleeding patient, birth control pills to a 70-year-old male and prescribing Viagra to a 2-year-old baby. All of these are obvious errors, so why didn’t the prescribers pick these up? The answer is simple: they are human, and humans err, especially when they are less experienced and over worked. Our software is able to mirror back to the providers the crowdsourced behavioral patterns of their peers and identify outliers to these patterns as errors.

You recently announced a partnership with Allscripts and their dbMotion interoperability solution.  How does that work and what’s the impact of this partnership?

Today’s healthcare systems have created a reality where patient health information can be scattered across multiple health systems, infrastructures and EHRs. The dbMotion health information exchange platform aggregates and harmonizes that scattered patient data, delivering the information clinicians need in a usable and actionable format at the point of care, within the provider’s native and familiar workflow. With dbMotion, all of the patient’s records are in one place. MedAware sits on top of the bdMotion interoperability platform as a layer of safety, accurately looking at the thousands of clinical inputs in the system and warning with even greater accuracy. MedAware catches various medication errors that would have been missed due to a decentralized patient health record. In addition to identifying prescription-based medication errors, MedAware can also notify physicians of patients who are at risk of opioid addiction.

This partnership will allow any institution using Allscripts’ dbMotion to easily implement MedAware’s system in a streamlined manner, with each installation being quick and effortless.

Once MedAware identifies a prescription error, how do you communicate that information back to the provider? Do you integrate your solution with the EHR vendor?

Yes, MedAware is integrated with EHR platforms. This is necessary for error detection and communication of the warning to the provider. There are two intervention scenarios: 1) Synchronous – when errors are caught at the point of order entry, a popup alert appears within the EHR user interface, without disturbing the provider’s workflow, and the provider can choose to accept or reject the alert. 2) Asynchronous – the errors/ADE is caught following a change in the patient’s clinical record (i.e. new lab result or vital sign), long after the prescription was entered. These alerts are displayed as a physician’s task, within the physician’s workflow and the EHR’s user interface.

What’s next for MedAware?  Where are you planning to take this technology?

The next steps for us are:

  1. Scale our current technology to grow to 20 million lives analyzed by 2020
  2. Create additional patient safety centered solutions to providers, such as opioid dependency risk assessment, gaps in care and trend projection analysis.
  3. Share our life-saving insights directly to those who need it most – consumers.

Execs Say Silicon Valley Has The Jump On Healthcare Innovation

Posted on September 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Lately, it’s begun to look as though the leading lights of Silicon Valley might bring the next wave of transformation to healthcare. But can they work big changes in the industry on their own, or are they more likely to succeed by throwing their extremely considerable muscle behind existing healthcare players? That’s one of the many questions at issue as companies like Google, Amazon (Yes, I know they’re in Seattle), and Facebook shoulder their way into the business.

According to a new survey by Reaction Data, many healthcare execs think Amazon, in particular, has the potential to change the game.  When asked which outside entrants were most likely to disrupt the healthcare industry, two-thirds of respondents said the that the online retailing giant topped the list. “Amazon is ahead of the game in many ways compared to the other companies,” a chief nursing officer told Reaction Data.

There’s little doubt that there’s an opening for a company like Amazon to solve some pressing problems. As an industry outsider – unless you count its recent big-ticket acquisition of PillPack, which happened about a minute ago – Amazon may be able to bring fresh eyes to some of healthcare’s biggest problems. For example, what health exec wouldn’t kill to benefit from the e-retailer’s immense logistics capabilities? The mind boggles.

Facebook and Google aren’t making as many healthcare headlines, but they too are moving carefully into the business. For example, consider Google’s partnership with Stanford aimed at creating digital scribes. The digital scribe initiative may not seem like much, but I wouldn’t underestimate what Google can learn from the effort and how effectively it can operationalize this knowledge. It isn’t 2010 anymore, and I think the search giant has come a long way since its Google Health PHR effort collapsed.

Facebook, too, has made some tentative steps toward building a healthcare business, such as its recent agreement to collaborate with the NYU School of Medicine on speeding up MRI scanning using AI. The social networking giant hasn’t shown itself capable of much diversification to date, but I wouldn’t count it out, if for no other reasons than the massive profits to be made. Even for Facebook, we’re talking about serious money here.

If you’re wondering what these companies hope to accomplish, it’s not surprising. There are so many possibilities. One place to start is rethinking the EHR. Maybe I’m a starry-eyed dreamer, but I agree with observers like Dale Sanders, an executive with HealthCatalyst, who argues that Silicon Valley disrupters might be poised to bring something new to the table. “I keep hoping that the Googles, Facebooks and Amazons of the world will quietly build a new generation EMR,” Sanders writes in a recent column.

EMR transformation is just one of many potential targets of opportunity for the Silicon Valley gang, though. There’s obviously a raft of other goals healthcare leaders might like to see realized, The truth is, though, that it matters less what the Silicon Valley giants do than the competitive scramble they kick off within the industry. Even if these behemoths never succeed in leading the charge, they’re likely to spur others to do so.

Healthcare CIOs Focused On Patient Experience And Innovation

Posted on August 2, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Not long ago, 22 healthcare CIOs had a sit-down to discuss their CEOs’ top IT-related priorities. At the meeting, which took place during the 2018 Scottsdale Institute Annual Conference, the participants found that they were largely on the same page, according to researchers that followed the conversation.

Impact Advisors, which co-sponsored the research, found that improving patient experiences was priority number one. More than 80% of CIOs said patient engagement and better patient experiences were critical, and that deploying digital health strategies could get the job done.

The technologies they cited included patient-facing options like wearables, mobile apps and self-service tools. They also said they were looking at a number of provider-facing solutions which could streamline transitions of care and improve patient flow, including care coordination apps and tools and next-generation decision support technologies such as predictive analytics.

Another issue near the top of the list was controlling IT costs and/or increasing IT value, which was cited by more than 60% of CIOs at the meeting. They noted that in the past, their organizations had invested large amounts of money to purchase, implement and upgrade enterprise EHRs, in an effort to capture Meaningful Use incentive payments, but that things were different now.

Specifically, as their organizations are still recovering from such investments, CIOs said they now need to stretch their IT budgets, They also said that they were being asked to prove that their organization’s existing infrastructure investments, especially their enterprise EHR, continue to demonstrate value. Many said that they are under pressure to prove that IT spending keeps offering a defined return on investment.

Yet another important item on their to-do list was to foster innovation, which was cited by almost 60% of CIOs present. To address this need, some CIOs are launching pilots focused on machine learning and AI, while others are forming partnerships with large employers and influential tech firms. Others are looking into establishing dedicated innovation centers within their organization. Regardless of their approach, the CIOs said, innovation efforts will only work if innovation efforts are structured and governed in a way that helps them meet their organization’s broad strategic goals.

In addition, almost 60% said that they were expected to support their organization’s growth. The CIOs noted that given the constant changes in the industry, they needed to support initiatives such as expansion of service lines or building out new ones, as well as strategic partnerships and acquisitions.

Last, but by no means least, more than half of the CIOs said cybersecurity was important. On the one hand, the participants at the roundtable said, it’s important to be proactive in defending their organization. At the same time, they emphasized that defending their organization involves having the right policies, processes, governance structure and culture.

Healthcare Leaders See AI Tech In Their Future

Posted on July 30, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

You’ve probably noticed that the movement of healthcare AI from visionary to commonplace has already begun. There are endless examples I could cite to demonstrate this, but here’s a taste:

  • A UK hospital is delegating some tasks usually performed by doctors and nurses to AI technology
  • The AMA is working to set standards for physician use of AI
  • Competition between AI-based disease management players is increasing
  • New AI software can detect signs of diabetic retinopathy without involving a physician

Of course, anytime a technology seems poised to take over the world, there’s a voice in our head saying “Are you sure?” And we all know there are many flashes in the technology pan.

When it comes to AI, however, we may be on the brink of such widespread adoption that no one could argue that it hasn’t arrived. According to a recent Intel survey of U.S. healthcare leaders, AI will be in use across the healthcare spectrum by 2023.

The research, which was conducted in partnership with Convergys Analytics, surveyed 200 US healthcare decision-makers in April 2018 on their attitudes about AI. The survey also asked subjects what barriers still existed to industry-wide AI adoption.

First, a significant number of respondents (54%) said that they expected AI to be in wide use in the industry within the next five years. Also, a substantial minority (37%) said they already used AI, though most reported that such use was limited.

Among those organizations that use AI, clinical use accounted for 77%, followed by operational use (41%) and financial use (26%). Meanwhile, respondents whose organizations hadn’t adopted AI still seem very enthusiastic about its possibilities, with 91% expecting that it will offer predictive analytics tools for early intervention, 88% saying it will improve care and 83% saying it will improve the accuracy of medical diagnoses.

Despite their enthusiasm, however, many of those surveyed were sure they could trust AI just yet. More than one-third of respondents said that patients wouldn’t trust AI enough to play an active role in their care (and they are probably right, at least for now). Meanwhile, 30% assume that clinicians wouldn’t trust AI either, predicting that concerns over fatal errors would kill their interest. Again, that’s probably a good guess.

In addition, there’s the issue of the AI “black box” to bear in mind. Though Intel didn’t go into detail on this, both clinicians and healthcare executives are concerned about the way AI gets its job done. My informal research suggests that until doctors and nurses understand how AI tools have made their decisions — and what data influenced these decisions — it will be hard to get them comfortable with it.

Healthcare Execs Investing In Intelligent Technologies Face Roadbumps

Posted on July 16, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A recent report from Accenture concludes that healthcare executives are enthusiastic about “intelligence technologies” such as AI and IoT. It also suggests, however, that health organizations will need to add new capabilities to be sure they can manage these technologies responsibly.

The report, based on a survey of 100 health executives, found that 77% of respondents expect to invest in IoT and smart sensors and that 53% expect to invest in AI systems.  Presumably, they expect these technologies to offer benefits more quickly.

Why the gap in adoption? The truth is that healthcare leaders haven’t yet gotten their arms around AI just yet. While IoT and smart sensor technology can boost the flexibility and “judgment” of enterprise systems, AI arguably has the potential to be far more flexible and wide-reaching — and ultimately less than predictable.

This unpredictability makes AI investment a bit trickier to implement than other emerging technologies. Just over four-fifths of health leaders said they were not prepared to explain AI-based conclusions to their internal stakeholders nor outsiders.

To address this deficit, 73% said they plan to develop internal ethical standards for AI to make sure these systems can act responsibly. Before that, they’ll need to determine what “acting responsibly” actually means — and as far as I know there are no accepted guidelines for developing such standards. (They might want to start off by reviewing Google’s ethical principles for AI use here.)

Adding AI to the enterprise IT mix could also wreak havoc. I for one was surprised to read that almost one-fourth of respondents said that they had been the target of adversarial AI behaviors, including falsified location data or bot fraud. (This stat blew my mind. Why haven’t we heard more about these “adversarial behaviors” and what are they?)

This certainly adds another element of uncertainty for CIOs interested in AI investments. While AI technologies can’t “think” in the traditional sense, they can create a range of problems previous-gen technology couldn’t.

This is part of a larger picture in which health organizations aren’t sure if their data has been corrupted. In fact, 86% of health execs said they hadn’t yet invested in technologies which could verify their data sources. Adding AI to the mix could potentially compound these problems, as it might create a cascade in which the AI then draws false inferences and takes inappropriate actions.

Meanwhile, respondents were excited about blockchain and smart contracts technology, with 91% reporting that they believed it would be a critical tool for supporting frictionless businesses over the next three years. All told, expect to see IoT and blockchain investments right away, with AI lagging until health IT leaders can teach it to play nicely.

A Missed Opportunity For Telemedicine Vendors

Posted on June 29, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Today, most direct-to-consumer telemedicine companies operate on a very simple model.

You pay for a visit up front. You talk to the doctor via video, the doctor issues as a prescription if needed and you sign off. Thanks to the availability of e-prescribing options, it’s likely your medication will be waiting for you when you get to the pharmacy.

In my experience, the whole process often takes 45 minutes or less. This beats the heck out of having to wait in line at an urgent care center or worse, the emergency department.

But what about caring for chronic illnesses that can’t be managed by a drive-by virtual visit? Can telemedicine vendors play a role here? Maybe so.

We already know that combining telemedicine with remote monitoring devices can be very effective. In fact, some health systems have gone all-in on virtual chronic care management.

One fascinating example is the $54 million Mercy Virtual Care Center, which describes itself as a “hospital without beds.” The Center, which has a few hundred employees, monitors more than 3,800 remote patients; sponsors a telehealth stroke program offering neurology services to EDs nationwide; manages a team of virtual hospitalists caring for patient around-the-clock using virtual visit tools; and runs Mercy SafeWatch, which the Center says is the largest single-hub electronic intensive care unit in the U.S.

Another example of such hospital-based programs is Intermountain Healthcare’s ConnectCare Pro, which brings together 35 telehealth programs and more than 500 clinicians. Its purpose is to supplement existing staffers and offer specialized services in rural communities where some of the services aren’t available.

Given the success of programs that maintain complex patients remotely, I think a private telemedicine company managing chronic care services might work as well. While hospitals have financial reasons to keep such care in-house, I believe an outside vendor could profit in other ways. That’s especially the case given the emergence of wearable trackers and smartwatches, which are far cheaper than the specialized tools needed in the past.

One likely buyer for this service would be health plans.

I’ve heard some complain publicly that in essence, telemedicine coverage just encourages patients to access care more often, which defeats the purpose of using it to lower healthcare costs. However, if an outside vendor offered to manage patients with chronic illnesses, it might be a more attractive proposition.

After all, health plans are understandably wringing their hands over the staggering cost of maintaining the health of millions of diabetics. In 2017, for example, the average medical expense for people diagnosed with diabetes was about $16,750 per year, with $9,600 due to diabetes. If health plans could lay the cost off to a specialized telemedicine vendor, some real savings might be possible.

Of course, being a telemedicine-based chronic care management company would be far different than offering direct-to-consumer telemedicine services on an occasional basis. The vendor would have to have comprehensive health data management tools, an army of case managers, tight relationships with clinicians and a boatload of remote monitoring devices on hand. None of this would come cheaply.

Still, while I haven’t fully run the numbers, my guess is that this could be a sustainable business model. It’s worth a try.