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Hospitals Still Lagging On Mobile

Posted on January 18, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

One would think that these days, when the desktop computer is an extension of mobile devices rather than the other way around, hospitals would have well-defined, mature plans in place for managing mobile technology. But according to one survey, that’s definitely not the case.

In a study sponsored by Spok, which provides clinical communication services, many healthcare providers are still in the early years of developing a mobile strategy.

The study, which drew on contacts with more than 300 healthcare professionals in the US, found that 21% had had a mobile strategy in place for less than one year, 40% for one to three years,14% for 3 to 5 years and 25% for more than five years. In other words, while one-quarter of organizations had settled in and developed a mobile approach, an almost equal amount were just getting their feet wet.

Not only that, many of those who do have a mobile strategy in place may be shooting from the hip. While 65% of those surveyed had a documented mobility strategy in place, 35% didn’t.

That being said, it seems that organizations that have engaged with mobile are working hard to tweak their strategy regularly. According to Spok, their reasons for updating the strategy include:

* Shifting mobile needs of end-users (44%)
* The availability of new mobile devices (35%)
* New capabilities from the EHR vendor (26%)
* Changes in goals of mobile strategy (23%)
* Challenges in implementing the strategy (21%)
* Changes in hospital leadership (16%)

(Seven percent said their mobile strategy had not changed since inception, and 23% weren’t sure what changes had been made.)

Nonetheless, other data suggest there has been little progress in integrating mobile strategy with broader hospital goals.

For example, while 53% wanted to improve physician-to-physician communications, only 19% had integrated mobile strategy with this goal. Fifty-three percent saw nurse-to-physician communications as a key goal, but only 18% had integrated this goal with their mobile plans. The gaps between other top strategies and integration with mobile plans were similar across the strategic spectrum.

Ultimately, it’s likely that it will take a team approach to bring these objectives together, but that’s not happening in the near future. According to respondents, the IT department will implement mobile in 82% of institutions surveyed, 60% clinical leadership, 37% doctors, 34% telecom department, 27% nurses and 22% outside help from consultants and vendors. (Another 16% didn’t plan to have a dedicated team in place.)

The whole picture suggests that while the hospital industry is gradually moving towards integrating mobile into its long-term thinking, it has a ways to go. Given the potential benefits of smart mobile use, let’s hope providers catch up quickly.

Change Healthcare Launch Raises Questions About Blockchain Scalability

Posted on January 12, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Healthcare technology vendor Change Healthcare has introduced a blockchain-based network focused on managing claims. Change says its Intelligent Healthcare Network is the first enterprise-scale blockchain network in healthcare.

According to the vendor, using technology will let organizations track the status of claims submission and remittance across the claims lifecycle accurately. It also contends that by using blocking technology in Intelligent Healthcare Network, companies will have a greater ability to audit trace and trust those involved in transactions.

To build out its blockchain infrastructure, Change Healthcare used Hyperledger Fabric 1.0, an open source blockchain framework hosted by The Linux Foundation.

Within the release, the company predicts that blockchain technology could ultimately offer providers a single viewpoint for accurately tracking the complete patient healthcare encounter, starting, say, when an individual arrives for a preoperative visit to the procedure care received, then later billing and payment.

All of that is well and good, but the following is more noteworthy.

In its statement, Change says its Intelligent Healthcare Network already processes more than 50 million claims and up to 550 transactions per second. It says that the capacity and speed of its network already exceeds the daily national transaction load, and that its network can scale as blockchain technology use grows.

Still, Change tells us that it will be building out its apparently massive network infrastructure “as the solution is further optimized and scaled to address demand.”  This suggests that Change may know something that we don’t about blockchain implementation. It’s not entirely clear, but I think the vendor thinks that its blockchain solution will generate significant network overhead, enough that even with its huge existing capacity, and eventually won’t be able to keep up with blockchain demands as is.

So that brings us to the real issue buried in this release. If Change needs to build out its super-high-capacity network as its blockchain customer base grows, it suggests to me that enterprise blockchain may not scale effectively overall at present.

If there is a scalability issue with Change’s blockchain service, there could be a number of reasons why. For example, it could be related to some idiosyncrasy within the company’s network architecture. Another guess is that Change is already having throughput problems it doesn’t want to discuss, and that blockchain is just adding insult to injury.

Still, one has to wonder whether the problems are inherent to blockchain itself. As far as I know, we don’t yet have much information on how blockchain solutions like Hyperledger perform in an enterprise environment. Perhaps we’ll learn something about this by keeping an eye on Change’s launch.

Why Clinicians Need a 2015 Certified EHR

Posted on January 11, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

What does “2015 Certified EHR” mean to practicing clinicians? The once-flooded EHR market is now whittling down to those vendors equipped to respond to regulatory and industry changes. The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information Technology listed more than 4,000 EHRs with 2014 certification criteria, according to the most recent data from healthIT.gov. And to date, only about 200 EHRs have passed the rigorous 2015 certification criteria.

However, beyond the fact that 2015 is indeed the most recent certification criteria as issued by the HHS, why should medical practices care?  

When vendors certify their EHRs, physicians—and patients—are ultimately the beneficiaries, says Beth Onofri, EHR and industry advisor at Kareo, who led the 2015 Certification process for the Kareo Clinical EHR. Physicians benefit because the technology allows them to easily attest that they’ve met quality requirements specified in the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA). This includes Advancing Care Information (ACI)-related measures that help physicians boost their payments. ACI accounts for 25 percent of a physician’s performance score that dictates reimbursement under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Patients benefit because they’re able to access and exchange their own health information more easily than ever before. It’s a win-win all around, says Onofri.

“The 2015 criteria require functionality supporting unprecedented patient engagement, care coordination, and information exchange, all of which bodes well for physicians striving to improve outcomes.”
—Beth Onofri, EHR and Industry Advisor at Kareo

Although using a certified EHR is important, implementing one that’s certified using only the 2015 criteria (not the 2014 criteria or a combination of the two) is a critical piece of the puzzle under MACRA, says Onofri. EHRs certified with the 2015 criteria help pave the way for physicians to receive a bonus in 2018. In addition, the 2015 criteria require functionality that supports unprecedented patient engagement, care coordination, and information exchange, all of which bodes well for physicians striving to improve outcomes.

Still, many physicians aren’t aware of how the 2015 certification criteria can help their practices, says Onofri.

Of the 60 different 2015 certification criteria, Onofri says these five are particularly helpful for practices seeking to improve the quality of the care they provide, ultimately fostering accurate payments under value-based payment reform:

1. View, download, and transmit health information to a third party

The 2015 criteria require a secure method of access (usually through a patient portal) as well as the ability to send information to an unsecured email address of the patient’s choice, says Onofri. The idea is that offering various access options improves overall patient engagement and outcomes.

She suggests creating a brochure that explains to patients how they can access and use the portal, including how to view, download, and transmit their health information. Another idea is to recruit a volunteer who can show patients how to use the portal while they wait in the waiting area. “There needs to be a strong advocate in each practice to make sure that these functionalities are implemented and used,” she adds. “Those practices with an advocate are the ones that will succeed.”

2. Secure messaging

This functionality allows physicians to send messages to—and receive messages from—patients in a secure manner, helping to improve engagement and communication. Practices must define how they’ll use secure messaging, including who will respond and what types of questions they’ll permit (e.g., fulfill appointment requests vs. answering clinical inquiries). “There are a small percentage of doctors who will want to answer their own messages, but there is a larger percentage of doctors who will want their staff to answer the emails and, if necessary, escalate to the provider,” says Onofri.

3. Patient health information capture

This functionality allows physicians to accept patient-generated health data into the EHR. For example, Onofri notes that the Kareo Clinical 2015 Edition EHR allows patients to record their health information at home to easily upload the information to their portal and transmit it securely to the physician for shared decision-making. The idea is that access to more comprehensive health data can help physicians prevent and manage disease—and it could be a game-changer in terms of population health management.

Start small when rolling out this functionality, she says. For instance, encourage patients with high blood pressure to upload their blood readings daily before engaging a second population (e.g., those with diabetes who upload their glucose levels).

4. Transitions of care

This functionality calls for interoperable documents that include key health data (e.g., name, date of birth, and medications) as well as standardized format for exchange. A transition of care summary provides critical information as patients transfer between different physicians at different health organizations or even distinct levels of care within the same organization.

“It’s not uncommon for our providers to send the referral right as they are completing the note with the patient in the room,” says Onofri. “This obviously speeds the care coordination for patients in terms of seeing another doctor.” The only caveat is that practices must compile a list of direct email addresses for physicians to whom patients are frequently referred, she adds.

5. Application programming interfaces (APIs)

“This is one of those requirements that is the foundation of things to come,” says Onofri. “It’s the first step toward interoperability.” API functionality will eventually allow patients to aggregate data from multiple sources in a web or mobile application of their choice.

Physicians who take the time to explore each of these 2015 certification functionalities may be more likely to improve outcomes and reap financial rewards under MACRA, says Onofri. “The improved functionality is there—is your practice taking advantage of it?”

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Is A Cerner Installation A “Downgrade” From Epic? Ask This Guy

Posted on January 8, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I don’t know if I’ve ever quoted a letter to the editor in a column for this publication, but I have to this time. I thought it had an interesting story to tell.

The letter, written by a patient at the Banner University of Arizona Medical Center in Tucson, offers a scathing critique what he sees “degradation of services” taking place after the institution switched from an Epic to a Cerner EHR, a change he refers to as a downgrade throughout the letter.

Since the “downgrade,” said the patient, John Kimbell, appointments take much longer. “Three weeks after the downgrade, my 30-minute appointment took three hours and 40 minutes,” he complains.

His other concerns include:

  • Data exchange problems: “My local doctor has TWICE sent results of a scan to my oncologist, and they never arrived.”
  • Privacy issues: With the automated paging system gone, “nurses call out names in the waiting areas in each clinic,” Kimbell notes.
  • Useless information: After Kimbell’s most recent appointment, he says, he was “handed out a 13-page printout that gave 12 pages information I didn’t need.” Before the Epic to Cerner switch, he reports, he was able to access this information online.
  • Communication issues: Kimbell says he never gets telephone call reminders of appointments anymore.

As Kimbell sees it, the quality of care has slipped significantly since Epic was switched out for a Cerner system. “All the cancer patients I have known while a patient there are in need of better care than Banner now provides,” he writes.

It’s important to note here that the Epic-to-Cerner switch-off took place in October last year, which means that the tech and administrative staff haven’t had much time to work out problems with the new installation. It may be the case that the concerns Kimbell had in late December won’t be an issue in a couple of months.

On the other hand, I do think it’s possible that as the letter implies, UMC owner Banner Health may have had reasons to push the Cerner install into the facility, most particularly if all of its other properties already operate using Cerner.

Regardless, if everything is as Kimbell describes, let’s hope it all gets back in order soon.  From the looks of things, UMC seems to offer a renowned cancer treatment program. Let’s hope that a quality program isn’t undermined by IT concerns.

Cerner $10 Billion VA Contract Comes To Screeching Halt

Posted on January 5, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

After Cerner captured the massive multi billion dollar contract to roll out its EMR for the Department of Defense, everyone was a bit stunned, as many thought Epic was a lock for the job.

Cerner seems to have been conducting the rollout as promised, so there’s that. But when it comes to its performance in meeting the requirements of its $10 billion contract with the VA, things aren’t looking as good. Apparently, Cerner’s DoD implementation isn’t sharing data well with Cerner’s VA systems. Oops.

According to Politico, the Cerner contract with the VA is running into serious questions about its capacity for fluid data sharing. The VA’s Cerner rollout has been held up by questions about its ability to interoperate with the DoD system.

VA Secretary David Shulkin, who’s perhaps the biggest critic of Cerner’s efforts, had his agency issue a request for information looking for examples of data-sharing solutions. Shulkin is proposing that the VA conduct tests of the system’s capacity for interoperability, in which the department would send patients through the VA system and see whether it can share useful data with the VA along the way. If the test has a bad outcome, it’s likely to ramp up the tension considerably.

What makes all of this particularly embarrassing is that the VA awarded the contract to Cerner without conducting the usual bidding process, largely because the agency believed having its own Cerner implementation would make it easier to share data with the DoD. Good luck with that, folks.

I’m sure that key managers on the VA project are freaking out at this point.  The combined multi billion dollars the DoD and VA have entrusted Cerner with represents a massive commitment, and when a customer that size starts questioning whether they’ve made a good investment, the ground must have begun trembling under Cerner’s feet. Not to mention the consultants from Leidos, etc who are charged with delivering a massive chunk of the project.

It’s hard to imagine that Epic isn’t seeing if it can take advantage of the situation. While it may not have the ability to horn in on the contracts themselves, I’m sure that it’s making sure customers know about what’s happening, and using the news to suggest that Cerner doesn’t have its act together.

I don’t know what will happen if the VA continues to find fault with Cerner, but it can’t be pretty.

EHR Physician Use by Time of Day

Posted on December 27, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

As we continue our holiday week of sharing interesting healthcare IT and EHR images, today’s image comes from the NEJM Catalyst. This image charts the Percent of total EHR work time against the hour of the day. Plus, it also splits it out into weekday work and weekend work.

The thing I hate about this chart is that it doesn’t show when doctors use to spend time doing paper charts. I still wonder how similar those charts would be. I’m just not sure we have that data anywhere.

“Twas the Night Before Go-Live – Fun Friday

Posted on December 22, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

The Friday before Christmas. Everyone’s favorite day at work. I hope all of you are enjoying the Holiday season and that you’re ready for Monday. I know I still have work to do.

I thought this holiday poem from Moxe Health would be a nice way to finish off the week as we head into Christmas. I think you’ll all enjoy it too:

Here’s the text of the poem:
‘Twas the night before go-live at Whoville Saint General-
Hospital, Clinics (and Drug Store) for Medical-
Treatment of Sore Throats and Coughing and Sneezing
(And any old illness your aunt might think pleasing).

The doctors and nurses were not in their beds.
How could they when ransomware danced in their heads?
The nighttime clinicians were making their rounds,
And hoping to not hear “Code grey!” or worse sounds.

With thoughts of the past their brave CMO trembled,
Like dachshunds on ice, which he somewhat resembled,
His hospital soon would wear new healthcare software,
In hopes that efficiencies soon would be found there.

Back months ago all the directors (nice folk),
With one voice had told him, “Get better!” They spoke:
“Our PHI — all of it’s leaking outside.
Our payers are livid! Please help us,” they cried.

The hospital CMO was a good man.
He said, “I will fix it as soon as I can.
When treating our patients I brook no delay.
We need a solution? So be it! I’ll pay!”

Then what to his sleep-deprived eyes should be seen,
An elf health IT vendor on his touchscreen!
She promised to help him to her best ability,
Promising inter-o–operability.

‘Twas smart and so friendly — a right jolly elf,
Millennial – but she could laugh at herself.
She sang, “As we move toward performance incentives,”
“It’s time for you all to start using preventives.”

With warnings of breaches piled up at her side,
“It’s time to stop mailing or FAXing,” she cried.
“Now with the Merit-Based Incentive Payment,
You must better serve ev’ry insurance claimant.”

“The blocking of info will be in the past,
Devices will network, in full and at last.
With EMR apps and solutions galore,
Just think of me as your IT superstore.”

Excited, our CMO then called his CEO,
Who in turn brought in their wonderful CFO,
And teleconferenced their hospital CIO,
“Yes, yes,” here, “Yes, yes there,” Ee yi oh, Ee yi oh.

The elf dressed in white, just like fresh snow, she said,
“Because in a hospital no one likes red.”
Her tech so disruptive, her sales pitch so merry!
Our CMO called for his tech guy, named Larry.

“On, Epic! On, Cerner, Athena, McKesson,
On, NextGen and Praxis!” The fairy’s good lesson:
“On, HIMSS, MIPS and HIPAA! On, HEDIS and Star!
Your hospital will be the most bestest by far!”

They went through the install. The elf vendor fairy-
Helped all the clinicians and IT guy Larry.
The CMO’s big day would swiftly arrive.
The button was pushed and the system went live!

Clinicians and board members feared for the worst, or
At least a big pop-up to “X” with the cursor.
But then it was just so amazing to see,
How swiftly was reconciled all HCC.

Staff pushback all melted, just a like spring icicle,
As they began their new revenue cyclical.
All the clinicians were filled with such gratitude,
And even patients took on a new attitude.

Screens, how they twinkled, and noses — they crinkled,
The food tasted better and sheets were not wrinkled.
With CPOE and all gap management flying,
Our CMO could not stop sillily smiling.

The fairy then left, trailing laughter and mirth,
As our CMO learned what good IT was worth.
You don’t even need to be the biggest spender
(So long as you have a good elf for your vendor).

6 Unique Anesthesiology Needs Where Traditional EHRs Fall Short

Posted on December 21, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Douglas Keene, MD Chief Medical Officer and Founder, Recordation Perioperative Information Management.

Anesthesiology has traditionally been thought of as a specialty profession limited to the operating room (OR). Over the past few years however, a revolution has been underway as the industry pushes to provide higher quality care at lower costs, motivating anesthesiologists to expand their typical role. Private anesthesiology groups are becoming more involved in the overall operations of the OR to improve the quality of care delivered inside and outside the operating room as well as keep their business’ running.

On average, the OR contributes between 60-70 percent of overall hospital revenue, solidifying the need for more efficient processes within the OR. Fortunately, we live in a world full of valuable insights and methods to capture data that can provide a lens into what’s working and what isn’t when it comes to operations. By further understanding how the operating room is running through specific data capture sets, not only are anesthesiologists, surgeons and other OR providers able to understand how they are performing during each surgery, hospital executives are also able to see quantitatively how their OR operations are performing. To do this however, anesthetists and hospital leaders need to identify a software that can address both hospital and clinical needs to improve outcomes.

There are many challenges decision makers face when it comes to identifying the best platform or solution for their hospitals’ OR operational needs. With so many options available between software systems and EHRs, it can be difficult to identify the best one for your practice, especially when it comes to the OR specifically. Here are a few things to consider when looking to adopt a new solution in your OR:

  • Get Specific: Your software should be designed for the unique characteristics of administering anesthesia in a variety of settings and situations. Since anesthesiology is a very precise specialty where differences in factors like body weight, drug interactivity, cardiac output, age, metabolism, ventilation and timing can influence what type and how anesthesia is administered, the ideal system must be able to capture all this type of data accurately.
  • Interoperability: Anesthesiologists rely heavily on medical devices to help monitor and detect abnormalities in blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen levels, etc. The anesthesiology software being used should integrate along with the other devices in order to pull the crucial information onto one cohesive platform. This will help anesthesiologists focus more on the patient rather than trying to keep up with watching multiple monitors and capturing it all by hand.
  • Data Capture: Anesthesiologists regularly interact with a team of nurses and other physicians (in addition to the patient), so the perioperative suite needs to be able to seamlessly export and import data from other EMR platforms.
  • Up-to-Date Drug Usage: Because the anesthesiologist’s role is to monitor the amount of medications being administered, it’s imperative for there to be a robust alert system to notify the anesthesiologist of any potential adverse drug reactions or allergies prior to any operation.
  • Physician Burnout Reduction: It’s no secret today’s physicians are burnt out from the amount of added work brought on by poorly developed EHR systems. As you look to implement a digital system within your OR setting, be sure to identify a technology that will not create more work for the physician and, at the same time, allow them to put more focus on the patient currently being treated.
  • Program Design: When looking for an OR solution, consider the architecture of the system and whether it is cloud-based or on-site as that will affect the installation and maintenance of the program. Choosing a platform that integrates without hassle is far more likely to be widely accepted by not only anesthesiologists, but other clinicians within the hospital.

There is certainly no shortage of EHR solutions out there, some with or without anesthesiology-specific technology. For hospital decision-makers and anesthesiologists, it’s important to be confident the solution you choose can improve your clinicians and overall OR operations while focusing on patient care.

About Recordation
Recordation is a cutting-edge Healthcare Informatics company revolutionizing how clinicians report and access crucial patient information before, during and after a patient’s operation. Founded by a physician, board-certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Management and Clinical Informatics, Recordation is a by-providers-for-providers company that reduces time spent on data capture, allowing for deep dive analysis of both clinical and operational data. Recordation contributes to a safer OR environment for the patient. The company is headquartered in Wayland, Mass. To learn more about Recordation, please visit the company online at www.recordation.com.

New Data Driven Perspectives in Healthcare w/ @MandiBPro and @Ashish_P

Posted on April 13, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

I was going through the Healthcare Scene archive of videos and realized I’d never shared my discussion with Mandi Bishop, Health Plan Analytics Innovation Practice Lead at Dell and Ashish Patel, Co-Founder of CareSet.com and DocGraph.com, about healthcare data. This was a really interesting discussion about various health data sources and what those sources of data could mean to healthcare. If you’re into healthcare data, you’ll really enjoy this discussion with two health data geeks (said with much affection).

What’s the Right Approach to Data Analytics in an ACO Shared Savings Program?

Posted on March 10, 2016 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

At the HIMSS 2016 Annual conference, Shahid Shah from Netspective Media had a chance to talk with Souvik Das, Principal Data Scientist and Big Data Architect at Sutter Health at the SAP booth to talk about Souvik’s healthcare analytics ACO work at Sutter Health.

In this video Shahid and Souvik talk about how a healthcare organization should prioritize their healthcare analytics efforts. They also talk about the need to work on analytics that improve patient care, increase revenue, and increase efficiency. Plus, they highlight how it’s not enough to focus on the technical aspects of your analytics, but you need to also focus on the organizational aspects. Souvik also highlights the key concept that “If you’re going to fail, fail small and fail early.” Finally he talks about the need to have buy in at the executive level or the project will fail.

If you’re working on healthcare analytics or are part of an ACO Shared Savings program, you’ll enjoy this video interview of Souvik Das from HIMSS 2016:

SAP is uniquely positioned to help advance personalized medicine and healthcare analytics. The SAP Foundation for Health is built on the SAP Hana platform which provides scalable cloud analytics solutions across the spectrum of healthcare including ACO Shared Savings Programs. SAP is a sponsor of Influential Networks of which Healthcare Scene is a member.