Free EMR Newsletter Want to receive the latest news on EMR, Meaningful Use, ARRA and Healthcare IT sent straight to your email? Join thousands of healthcare pros who subscribe to EMR and HIPAA for FREE!!

EMR Integration Paying Dividends For All Types of Healthcare Practitioners

Posted on July 17, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post from the team at Fullscript, a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. Follow and engage with them on Twitter: @FullscriptHQ

It would not be a stretch to say that EMRs have been both a blessing and curse for healthcare practitioners. There is no doubt that EMRs have improved the safety of care and the mountain of data that has been collected is now powering the renaissance of Artificial Intelligence in healthcare. However, EMRs have also increased the workload on clinicians which in turn has negatively impacted the overall patient experience and has contributed to burnout. It would not be a stretch to say that EMRs have been both a blessing and curse for healthcare practitioners. There is no doubt that EMRs have improved the safety of care and the mountain of data that has been collected is now powering the renaissance of Artificial Intelligence in healthcare. However, EMRs have also increased the workload on clinicians which in turn has negatively impacted the overall patient experience and has contributed to burnout.

To help practitioners, HealthIT vendors need to ensure their products can be:

  • Tightly integrated with EMRs so that data can be shared easily
  • Seamlessly incorporated into existing workflows
  • Tuned to fit the specific needs of the practice

Fullscript, an online e-prescribing platform helps integrative medical practitioners dispense supplements without the need for physical inventory. This saves valuable office space and improves the overall safety of practices. The company offers over 20,000 professional-grade supplements. Key to the company’s success has been the integration of their platform with existing EMRs coupled with their user-friendly workflow features.

Dr. J. E. Williams, a highly respected integrative medicine clinician who treats and revitalizes patients across a spectrum of illness, implemented Fullscript in order to provide his patients with a streamlined experience and to improve the performance of his practice.

Prior to Fullscript, Dr. Williams, used a non-integrated e-prescribing system. That system was difficult to use and his patients frequently complained at how confusing it was. The result was that patients were not filling their scripts and were not following the prescribed regimen. After switching to Fullscript, Dr. Williams could seamlessly e-prescribe what his patients need, directly from within his EMR. In addition, the easy-to-use nature of the system has made it less confusing for patients. The net result is that Dr. Williams has experienced 100% patient compliance by using Fullscript through his EMR.

“I can write a recommendation when a patient is in front of me, or immediately afterwards. ​Patients want to see their recommendation in their inbox right away, and that’s what Fullscript provides. My patients love it.” – Dr. J.E. Williams

Dr Williams is on a mission to bridge complementary as well as alternative therapies with evidence-based clinical science. Although some would see this as controversial, Dr. Williams firmly believes that there is growing evidence of improved patient outcomes when melding ancient wisdom with modern science. The ultimate goal is to use the most efficient therapies with the least side effects for patients.

The success of Dr Williams demonstrates the power of tight integration with EMRs for all types of clinicians. Gone are the days when clinicians had to tolerate clunky stand-alone systems. Today, they can and should expect their HealthIT partners to provide systems that seamlessly integrate with their existing applications.

Fullscript embraces this vision and has worked with over a thousand practitioners just like Dr Williams to provide the ability to e-prescribe nutraceuticals in as little as 4 weeks.

To learn more about Fullscript’s EMR integration or to read more about Dr. Williams, click here.

Healthcare Execs Investing In Intelligent Technologies Face Roadbumps

Posted on July 16, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

A recent report from Accenture concludes that healthcare executives are enthusiastic about “intelligence technologies” such as AI and IoT. It also suggests, however, that health organizations will need to add new capabilities to be sure they can manage these technologies responsibly.

The report, based on a survey of 100 health executives, found that 77% of respondents expect to invest in IoT and smart sensors and that 53% expect to invest in AI systems.  Presumably, they expect these technologies to offer benefits more quickly.

Why the gap in adoption? The truth is that healthcare leaders haven’t yet gotten their arms around AI just yet. While IoT and smart sensor technology can boost the flexibility and “judgment” of enterprise systems, AI arguably has the potential to be far more flexible and wide-reaching — and ultimately less than predictable.

This unpredictability makes AI investment a bit trickier to implement than other emerging technologies. Just over four-fifths of health leaders said they were not prepared to explain AI-based conclusions to their internal stakeholders nor outsiders.

To address this deficit, 73% said they plan to develop internal ethical standards for AI to make sure these systems can act responsibly. Before that, they’ll need to determine what “acting responsibly” actually means — and as far as I know there are no accepted guidelines for developing such standards. (They might want to start off by reviewing Google’s ethical principles for AI use here.)

Adding AI to the enterprise IT mix could also wreak havoc. I for one was surprised to read that almost one-fourth of respondents said that they had been the target of adversarial AI behaviors, including falsified location data or bot fraud. (This stat blew my mind. Why haven’t we heard more about these “adversarial behaviors” and what are they?)

This certainly adds another element of uncertainty for CIOs interested in AI investments. While AI technologies can’t “think” in the traditional sense, they can create a range of problems previous-gen technology couldn’t.

This is part of a larger picture in which health organizations aren’t sure if their data has been corrupted. In fact, 86% of health execs said they hadn’t yet invested in technologies which could verify their data sources. Adding AI to the mix could potentially compound these problems, as it might create a cascade in which the AI then draws false inferences and takes inappropriate actions.

Meanwhile, respondents were excited about blockchain and smart contracts technology, with 91% reporting that they believed it would be a critical tool for supporting frictionless businesses over the next three years. All told, expect to see IoT and blockchain investments right away, with AI lagging until health IT leaders can teach it to play nicely.

How e-Prescribing Features Improve Your Practice Life

Posted on July 9, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Dr. Tom Giannulli, CMIO at Kareo.

e-Prescribing, the process of electronically fulfilling a medication prescription directly from your practice, is far from new. In fact, this service has been around long enough that the majority of patients have come to expect the convenience that accompanies it.

Most private practices are using some type of medical software that aids in the e-Prescribing process. Some may have incorporated said software because they felt obligated, but others have realized that an integrated software solution can do more than help meet the requirements for the meaningful use electronic health record (EHR) initiative.

They recognize that it may also help to improve their practice.

As the clinical leader for an electronic health record (EHR) vendor serving independent practices, I can attest that Kareo’s cloud-based software is designed with the intent to improve the unique needs of the private practice. The changes in regulations and requirements might mean you should change the way you practice, but it doesn’t have to reduce the personal connection between patients and their providers.

Improve Upon Value-Based Care

Value-based care is driven by data and has required practices to become more efficient and effective in order to reduce overall healthcare costs.

Without the automated support that accompanies e-prescribing, compiling the number of required reports could become overwhelming and significantly reduce your efficiency. Our software can make compiling this data with accurate reports both simple and manageable, which saves you valuable time. It makes tracking the quality metrics related to drug compliance much easier, but it’s also tracking quality by:

  • Helping to reduce your liability with legible prescriptions
  • Improving upon prescription accuracy
  • Reducing medication errors
  • Improving upon patient compliance
  • Monitoring fraud and abuse from duplicate prescriptions

Having an automated perspective on drug interactions and prescription history at your fingertips allows you to focus on measures that improve preventative care. This global perspective on each patient’s individual treatment can potentially reduce abuse and readmissions.

Leverage a “Heads Up” Philosophy

You won’t hear many, if any, physicians state that they chose medicine for the abundance of paperwork.

The time EHR can save on administrative tasks provides the physician with more time to do what they enjoy—care for their patients. Patients often choose a practice because they want that personal connection with their physician. Someone who knows their story, and is aware of their health history. Most patients don’t enjoy waiting while the physician is writing notes, asking them to repeat their medical history, or trying to find the correct button on the computer. This won’t help to increase patient satisfaction, and gain patient loyalty. With the information right in front of you, you have more time to devote to quality communication, which gains your patient’s trust.

There are several secondary key benefits to practicing “Heads Up” Medicine with e-prescribing that help improve the patient experience by devoting your attention to your patient, not your computer. You’re still getting the essential information with an easy method of information collection by pointing and clicking.

  • Reviewing key points and a simple question and answer interview can help you build your narrative.
  • Your EHR is accessible on a mobile device, such an IPad, and not just on a website
  • You don’t have to spend the extra time typing the narrative in each time and starting from scratch.

Save Significant Time

Time is valuable to you, and your patients. The time saved with automated support does more than make your patients happy by getting them in and out of their visit quicker, it also shows that you respect their time.

Less time waiting and more time with their providers often results in better patient satisfaction. Word of mouth is often the most effective form of marketing and satisfied patients refer new patients to help you continue to grow your business.

Our software takes care of the bulk of your work with chart, bill and fill to reduce administrative tasks and improve your workflow. It helps you write the note, ensures that you get the billing codes correct and fills the prescription and orders lab work. This allows you to improve your workflow by:

  • Getting the billing done quickly and accurately to expedite payment
  • Allowing you to see more patients in the same amount of time
  • Helping you gain a better balance between your work and personal life to reduce the risk of burnout
  • Making sure your patients don’t leave because of extended wait times

Maintain a Personal Connection

Engaging more with your clients can foster patient satisfaction and loyalty to your practice. Your patients want compassionate care provided and human interaction, and you can leverage this “heads up” philosophy with the simple solutions offered in EHR software to manage the bulk of your administrative work.

Seek out technology and service solutions to improve your practice, increase patient satisfaction and provide you with more time to focus on priorities to aid in the growth of your practice, rather than being burdened with administrative tasks. Because you chose to work in private practice for the patients, not the paperwork.

About Tom Giannulli, MD, MS
Tom Giannulli, MD, MS, is the chief medical information officer at Kareo, a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. He is a respected innovator in the medical technology arena with more than 15 years of deep experience in mobile technology and medical software development. 

Is Amazon Ready To Protect Patient Data?

Posted on July 6, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Late last month, a Connecticut woman found out that a third-party Amazon vendor she had done business with had exposed her personal medical data to the world, including her medical conditions, along with her name, birthdate and emergency contact information.

The story suggests that Amazon engaged in a bit of bureaucratic foot shuffling when called on the privacy lapse. According to the woman, an Amazon call center rep told her it would investigate the issue, but a further email told her they would not be able to release the outcome of this investigation. It’s little wonder she wasn’t satisfied.

Ultimately, it appears that she was only able to get immediate action once she contacted the third-party seller, which took the photos containing the information down promptly upon her request.

Though no small matter for the woman involved, the episode means little for the future of Amazon, in and of itself. However, it does suggest that the marriage of Amazon technology and healthcare data may pose unexpected problems.

For those who have been sleeping under a rock, in late June Amazon announced that it had acquired online pharmacy PillPack for what reports say was just under $1 billion. PillPack, which competes with services delivered by giants like CVS, lets users buy their meds in pre-made doses. News stories suggest that Amazon beat out fellow retail giant Walmart in making the buy, which should close the second half of this year.

Without a doubt, this was a banner day in the history of Amazon, which has officially stamped into healthcare in 10-ton boots. The deal could not only mark the beginning of new era for the retailer, but also the healthcare industry, which hasn’t yet seen a tech company take a lead in any consumer-facing healthcare business.

That being said, perhaps a more important question for readers of this publication is how it will manage data generated by PillPack, a store likely to grow exponentially as Amazon integrates the online pharmacy into its ecosystem.

While there are obviously many good things its staggering fulfillment and logistics capabilities can bring to PillPack, Amazon’s otherwise amazing systems weren’t built to protect patient health information.

When it comes to most any other company, I’d imagine these problems could be addressed by layering HIPAA-compliant technologies and policies over its existing infrastructure. However, given the widely distributed nature of its retail network, it’s not just a matter of rethinking some architecture. Sealing off health data could require completely transforming its approach to doing business. Just about every retail transaction could prove a chink in its armor.

Since it wasn’t itself required to meet HIPAA standards in this instance, Amazon won’t get any flack from regulators over the recent PHI exposure. Still, issues like this could undercut the trust it needs to integrate PillPack into its core business successfully.

If nothing else, Amazon had better put a strong PHI protection policy in place on its retail side. Otherwise, it could undermine the business it just spent almost $1 billion to buy.

An Interesting Overview Of Alphabet’s Healthcare Investments

Posted on June 27, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Recently I’ve begun reading a blog called The Medical Futurist which offers some very interesting fare. In addition to some intriguing speculation, it includes some research that I haven’t seen anywhere else. (It is written by a physician named Bertalan Mesko.)

In this case, Mesko has buried a shrewd and well-researched piece on Alphabet’s healthcare investments in an otherwise rambling article. (The rambling part is actually pretty interesting on its own, by the way.)

The piece offers a rather comprehensive update on Alphabet’s investments in and partnerships with healthcare-related companies, suggesting that no other contender in Silicon Valley is investing in this sector heavily as Alphabet’s GV (formerly Google Ventures). I don’t know if he’s right about this, but it’s probably true.

By Mesko’s count, GV has backed almost 60 health-related enterprises since the fund was first kicked off in 2009. These investments include direct-to-consumer genetic testing firm 23andme, health insurance company Oscar Health, telemedicine venture Doctor on Demand and Flatiron Health, which is building an oncology-focused data platform.

Mesko also points out that GV has had an admirable track record so far, with five of the companies it first backed going public in the last year. I’m not sure I agree that going public is per se a sign of success — a lot depends on how the IPO is received by Wall Street– but I see his logic.

In addition, he notes that Alphabet is stocking up on intellectual resources. The article cites research by Ernest & Young reporting that Alphabet filed 186 healthcare-related patents between 2013 and 2017.

Most of these patents are related to DeepMind, which Google acquired in 2014, and Verily Life Sciences (formerly Google Life Sciences). While these deals are interesting in and of themselves, on a broader level the patents demonstrate Alphabet’s interest in treating chronic illnesses like diabetes and the use of bioelectronics, he says.

Meanwhile, Verily continues to work on a genetic data-collecting initiative known as the Baseline Study. It plans to leverage this data, using some of the same algorithms behind Google’s search technology, to pinpoint what makes people healthy.

It’s a grand and somewhat intimidating picture.

Obviously, there’s a lot more to discuss here, and even Mesko’s in-depth piece barely scratches the surface of what can come out of Alphabet and Google’s health investments. Regardless, it’s worth keeping track of their activity in the sector even if you find it overwhelming. You may be working for one of those companies someday.

5 Steps to Ensure Revenue Integrity After Implementing a New EHR

Posted on June 18, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Lisa Eramo, a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog.

In the rush to implement EHRs for Meaningful Use incentives, many practices lost sight of what matters most for continued success—revenue integrity, says Joette Derricks, healthcare compliance and revenue integrity consultant in Baltimore, MD. Revenue integrity—the idea that practices must take proactive steps to capture and retain revenue—isn’t a novel concept. However, it’s becoming increasingly important for physician practices operating in a regulatory-driven environment, she adds.

Revenue integrity is also an important part of ensuring smooth cashflow during and after the transition to a new EHR, says Derricks. This is a time when revenue opportunities are easily overlooked as practices adjust to new navigation, templates, and more, she adds.

Revenue integrity is all about compliance, says Derricks. “It’s about taking a holistic approach to operational efficiency, regulatory compliance, and maximizing reimbursement,” she adds. “It’s about doing things the right way.”

Maximizing reimbursement isn’t about ‘gaming’ the system to upcode. Rather, it’s about implementing processes and procedures to ensure that practices are paid for all of the services they perform without leaving money on the table or generating revenue that payers will later recoup, she explains.

Derricks provides five simple steps practices can take to ensure revenue integrity following an EHR implementation:

1. Review EHR templates. Do templates include the most specific CPT and ICD-10-CM codes? And do physicians understand the importance of avoiding unspecified codes, when possible?

2. Examine the interface between the EHR and practice management system. Do the codes that physicians assign in the EHR feed correctly into the practice management system? For example, when a physician performs an E/M service in addition to a procedure, does the EHR map both codes to the practice management system for billing purposes? Does the practice management system correctly bundle and unbundle services, when appropriate?

3. Run your numbers frequently. Ideally, practices will perform a monthly data analysis to help gauge performance and identify potential missed revenue opportunities, says Derricks. For example, she suggests running a report of the practice’s top 20 billing codes in a particular month. Then, compare those codes with the top 20 codes the practice billed that same month in the previous year. What has changed, and why? And have these changes benefited or hurt the practice? For example, practices may see new codes in that list because they added chronic care or transitional care management, both of which provide additional revenue. Or practices may discover a system glitch that incorrectly bundled services that are separately payable, thus causing a revenue loss.

“Everybody can play the ‘I’m too busy’ game, but this is too important to fall into that trap,” says Derricks. “I applaud the office manager or practice administrator who recognizes the value of constantly being on the lookout for system-wide improvements and analyzing their own numbers.”

Some practice management systems provide robust billing analytics that can help practices identify the root cause of billing errors and omissions. Working with a consultant is another option, says Derricks. Consultants provide unbiased input regarding inefficiencies and vulnerabilities and can provide a ‘fresh set of eyes’ necessary to effect change. They also often have access to benchmarking tools and other resources that can help practices identify revenue gaps and delays, she adds.

For example, Derricks suggests performing an assessment for revenue gaps and roadblocks to reduce the workflow process errors that delay revenue. Download the assessment.

4. Provide physician training. Physicians need thorough training on how to use the EHR properly so as to avoid data omissions, says Derricks. They also need annual training on new CPT and ICD-10-CM codes as well as new documentation requirements, she adds.

5. Create an environment that promotes compliance. This requires a top-down approach from physicians and practice managers, says Derricks. “Everyone should have their eyes open and feel comfortable being able to address concerns,” she says. “It should be an open-door policy in terms of looking at processes versus putting your head down.”

About Lisa Eramo
Lisa Eramo is a regular contributor to Kareo’s Go Practice Blog, as well as other healthcare publications, websites and blogs, including the AHIMA Journal. Her focus areas are medical coding, clinical documentation improvement and healthcare quality/efficiency.  Kareo is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene.

Stanford Survey Generates Predictable Result: Doctors Want EHR Changes

Posted on June 11, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

I know you’re going to have trouble believing this, but many PCPs think EHRs need substantial changes.

Such is the unsurprising conclusion drawn by a survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Stanford Medicine. The poll, which took place between March 2 and March 27 of this year, surveyed 521 PCPs licensed to practice in the U.S. who have been using their current EHR system for at least one month.

The physicians were recruited via snail mail from the American Medical Association Masterfile. Figures for years in practice by gender, region and primary medical specialty were weighted where necessary to bring them into line with their actual proportions in the population of PCPs in the U.S.

According to the survey, about two-thirds of PCPs think EHRs have generally improved care (63%). Two-thirds said they were at least somewhat satisfied with their current systems, though only 18% were very satisfied.

Meanwhile, a total of 34% were somewhat or very dissatisfied with their system, and 40% of PCPs said that EHRs create more challenges than benefits. Also, 49% of office-based PCPs reported that using an EHR detracts from their clinical effectiveness.  Forty-four percent of PCPs said that primary value of EHRs is data storage, while just 8% said that the biggest benefits were clinically-related.

To improve EHRs’ clinical value, it will take a lot of effort, with 51% saying they think EHRs need a complete overhaul.  Seventy-two percent of PCPs said that improving user interfaces could best address their needs in the immediate future.

Meanwhile, 67% of respondents said that solving interoperability problems should be the top priority for EHR development over the next decade, and 43% reported wanting improved predictive analytics capabilities.

Nearly all (99%) of PCPs said that EHR capabilities should include maintaining a high-quality record of patient data over time, followed closely by providing an intuitive user experience. Also, 88% said that providing clinical decision support at the moment of care was important, followed by identifying high-risk patients in their patient panel (86%).

When asked what EHR features they found most satisfying, they cited maintaining a high-quality patient record (73%), offering patients access to medical records (71%), sharing information with providers across the care continuum (65%) and supporting practice/revenue cycle management needs (60%).

However, EHRs still have a long way to go in offering other preferred capabilities, including changing and adapting in response to user feedback, improving patient-provider interaction, coordinating care for patients with complex conditions and engaging patients in prescribed care plans through mobile technologies. Vendors, you have been warned.

Physician Burnout, a Healthcare Issue Unique to Our Healthcare Providers

Posted on May 25, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog post by Justin Campbell, Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions.

I Can’t Get No Satisfaction…but I try, and I try, and I try, and I try – Rolling Stones

Justin CampbellIn a 2018 Medscape survey exploring the professional satisfaction of providers, 42 percent of 15,000 survey respondents reported feeling burnt out with their jobs, up from an overall rate of 40 percent in 2017. In recent years, physician burnout has become a serious industry issue, with national policy discussions ensuing on how to best combat the problem. Researchers have drawn correlations between physician burnout and higher medical error rates, lower overall quality of care, and increased clinical staff turnover. Year after year, the underlying drivers of dissatisfaction have remained consistent: overwhelming charting requirement, long work hours, and cumbersome EHRs.

As health IT leaders, one question we should be asking ourselves is how we can best apply our EHR expertise to help reduce physician burnout. To answer this question, let us look to the doctors we aim to help. When physicians are at the bedside, they analyze a patient’s condition and formulate a care plan accordingly. They look to diagnostic test results, review trended vitals, pain scores, and nursing assessments, and consult with specialists in a massive data gathering exercise all aimed at quantifying the problem and crafting a treatment plan.

Providers are telling us there is a problem, and they are consistently identifying the primary underlying causes. IT department leaders have a direct influence over many of the drivers of physician burnout, so it is time for us to dig into the details, measure the problem, and craft a treatment plan. How do we measure and manage physician burnout?

There’s Gold In Those EHR Audit Logs

The Office of the National Coordinator’s EHR Certification Requirements mandate that all certified EHRs be capable of generating an audit log detailing all user activity, stored in a database alongside user credentials and a date and time stamp. At first glance, these unassuming audit logs appear to provide little actionable insight, but buried in the data there is value. When audit logs are compiled across several months, data analysts will quickly see that they have a rich dataset that can be sliced and diced to expose the EHR navigation and module utilization trends of key physician populations.

Analyzing patterns within EHR audit logs will allow savvy data analysts to determine the average length of time providers spend working in the EHR. This information can be calculated at the individual level or aggregated across all providers.

Source: Galen Healthcare Solutions

Knowing how long providers are spending on administrative tasks in the EHR is valuable information for a number of reasons. First and foremost, this information can be used as a benchmark to measure the impact of future software updates or optimization projects. Any significant changes to provider workflow should be retrospectively reviewed to understand how it impacts the average time providers spend in the EHR. First, do no harm.

Analyzing user activity logs at the individual level also helps identify highly efficient EHR users within each specialty. The EHR workflow patterns of these EHR champions can be modeled. Peers can be educated on how to adjust their own workflows to mirror specialty-specific champions, reducing their own daily EHR burden. These “quick win” workflow adjustments are changes that can be adopted by clinical staff immediately, before extensive EHR optimization efforts are undertaken.

Audit log analysis can also highlight which EHR modules providers spend the most time in. In most cases, updating user preferences and optimizing the information displayed on EHR screens can expedite chart navigation. Simplified documentation templates and macros training can expedite the documentation process. A library of evidence-based order sets and targeted clinical decision support algorithms can minimize time spent entering orders.

Analyzing utilization trends at the EHR module level exposes the workflow tasks that are consuming a disproportionate amount of provider time.

Don’t. Stop. There.

EHR audit log analysis can reveal how much time providers are spending in the EHR, and where specifically they are spending that time. It can identify physician champions, and highlight those that are struggling. Audit log analysis can be used to measure EHR-induced physician burnout and support system-wide optimization efforts aimed at improving satisfaction.

Beyond this, EHRs offer a wealth of additional datasets that can help highlight inefficiencies in clinical workflows. Traditional health IT data analytics typically aims to uncover problems in care quality or revenue cycle management, but analysis focused on EHR workflow improvement is just as noble an effort, and one providers have long been seeking.

Gain perspectives from HDO leaders who have successfully navigated EMR clinical optimization and refine your EMR strategy to transform it from a short-term clinical documentation data repository to a long-term asset by downloading our EMR Optimization Whitepaper.

About Justin Campbell
Justin is Vice President, Strategy, at Galen Healthcare Solutions. He is responsible for market intelligence, segmentation, business and market development and competitive strategy. Justin has been consulting in Health IT for over 10 years, guiding clients in the implementation, integration and optimization of clinical systems. He has been on the front lines of system replacement & data migration and is passionate about advancing interoperability in healthcare and harnessing analytical insights to realize improvements in patient care. Justin can be found on Twitter at @TJustinCampbell and LinkedIn.

About Galen Healthcare Solutions
Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing high-skilled, cross-platform expertise and Gold sponsor of Health IT Expo. For over a decade, Galen has partnered with more than 300 specialty practices, hospitals, health information exchanges, health systems and integrated delivery networks to provide high-quality, expert level IT consulting services including strategy, optimization, data migration, project management, and interoperability. Galen also delivers a suite of fully integrated products that enhance, automate, and simplify the access and use of clinical patient data within those systems to improve cost-efficiency and quality outcomes. For more information, visit www.galenhealthcare.com. Connect with us on TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn.

 

Google And Fitbit Partner On Wearables Data Options

Posted on May 7, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Fitbit and Google have announced plans to work together, in a deal intended to “transform the future of digital health and wearables.” While the notion of transforming digital health is hyperbole even for companies the size of Google and Fitbit, the pairing does have plenty of potential.

In a nutshell, Fitbit and Google expect to take on both consumer and enterprise health projects that integrate data from EMRs, wearables and other sources of patient information together. Given the players involved, it’s hard to doubt that at least something neat will emerge from their union.

Among the first things the pair plans to use Google’s new Cloud Healthcare API to connect Fitbit data with EMRs. Of course, readers will know that it’s one thing to say this and another to actually do it, but gross oversimplifications aside, the idea is worth pursuing.

Also, using services such as those offered by Twine Health– a recent Fitbit acquisition — the two companies will work to better manage chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. Twine offers a connected health platform which leverages Fitbit data to offer customized health coaching.

Of course, as part of the deal Fitbit is moving to the Google Cloud Platform, which will supply the expected cloud services and engineering support.

The two say that moving to the Cloud Platform will offer Fitbit advanced security capabilities which will help speed up the growth of Fitbit Health Solutions business. They also expect to make inroads in population health analysis. For its part, Google also notes that it will bring its AI, machine learning capabilities and predictive analytics algorithms to the table.

It might be worth a small caution here. Google makes a point of saying it is “committed” to meeting HIPAA standards, and that most Google Cloud products do already. That “most” qualifier would make me a little bit nervous as a provider, but I know, why worry about these niceties when big deals are afoot. However, fair warning that when someone says general comments like this about meeting HIPAA standards, it probably means they already employ high security standards which are likely better than HIPAA. However, it also means that they probably don’t comply with HIPAA since HIPAA is about more than security and requires a contractual relationship between provider and business associate and the associated liability of being a business associate.

Anyway, to round out all of this good stuff, Fitbit and Google said they expect to “innovate and transform” the future of wearables, pairing Fitbit’s brand, community, data and high-profile devices with Google’s extreme data management and cloud capabilities.

You know folks, it’s not that I don’t think this is interesting. I wouldn’t be writing about if I didn’t. But I do think it’s worth pointing out how little this news announcement says, really.

Yes, I realize that when partnerships begin, they are by definition all big ideas and plans. But when giants like Google, much less Fitbit, have to fall back on words like innovate and transform (yawn!), the whole thing is still pretty speculative. Just sayin’.

Be Skeptical About Health IT Research Reports

Posted on April 26, 2018 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

Look, I get it. While advice from colleagues is fine, it’s even better to have an objective research organization tell you which vendors dominate the market and which seem to have a lot of fans.

You know some of the headlines, in big bold letters: “Epic has the biggest EMR market share in the US” or “Doctors are very satisfied with eClinicalWorks.” Hey, if nothing else, you can wave the report in your boss’ face if your new system doesn’t work out.

The thing is, are you getting valuable, fair, unbiased feedback from research vendors? Not necessarily.

  • Pay for play: Some research firms are getting paid to promote certain products or organizations in their reports and client notes. The payment can be as subtle as a few introductions to potential customers or a straight up bundle of cash. Sadly, not all analyst firms who engage in this practice will tell you that they do.
  • Lack of experience: While some research reports are written by senior people with a long institutional memory, sometimes they are farmed out to junior staff members with a lot less perspective. I’m not suggesting that the younger people get it wrong, but they simply can’t offer the kind of insight senior people can.
  • Beauty contests: Be warned: sometimes reports are just not about you. It may appear, on the surface, that the research firm is offering you valuable insights, but the truth is that the research isn’t that substantial. In cases like these, the firms simply line up all the vendors in a row and rate them on scales they basically make up in their head.
  • Value of the data: Sure, it’s sort of fun and interesting to know whether Epic has nudged out Cerner or MEDITECH in the battle for US market share. It’s something to share over the health IT water cooler. And it seems to give you a sense of which vendors are offering the most value. But does it really? In most case, it probably isn’t that helpful to track market share unless you hold stock in one of these companies.

For what it’s worth, I’ve written several in-depth research reports of my own, and I feel pretty good about the industry analysis I did. But thankfully, none of the publishers suggested that I was the Oracle of truth. I simply gathered up a pile the facts and tried to fit them together.

In saying all this, I’m not suggesting that health IT industry research is a waste of time. If a report offers context, input from your peers and no-nonsense answers to questions you have, it may well be worth the price. But don’t let one of these firms sell you a bunch of hot air.