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Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 23, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/26 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft on the topic of “Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a statistic stating that roughly 117 million people have one or more chronic health conditions. One in four people has two more chronic conditions. That is so many people! It’s 2018 and there are tons of innovative technologies out there. Why aren’t we doing a better job of managing our health conditions?

In a recent blog, I posted that chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record or patient portal to link wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What changes in healthcare technology need to be made to more effectively treat and manage patients with chronic conditions?

Join us to talk about patient portals and chronic disease management during this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: Would you (or do you) use technology to help manage your health and wellness? Why or why not? #HITsm

T2: Effectively managing chronic disease can involve changing habits and forming good habits. What are some ways IT can help patients form and maintain good habits? #HITsm

T3: What’s a feature you wish patient portals had that they currently do not? #HITsm

T4: If patient portals collected data so providers could participate in MACRA/MIPS more seamlessly, would you be more apt to encourage their use in your organization? #HITsm

T5: Does your employer provide you a PHR as an employee benefit? If so, does it motivate you to be an engaged patient? #HITsm

Bonus: What are the benefits of having a complete personal health record that you can access anywhere? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
2/2 – TBD

2/9 – TBD

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – #HIMSS18
Hosted by #HIMSS18 Social Media Ambassadors

3/2 – Machine Learning and AI in Healthcare
Hosted by Corinne Stroum (@healthcora)

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

How is Society’s Drive for Everything “On Demand” Changing Healthcare? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 17, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/19 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Darin Vander Well (@DarinVanderWell) from @docutap on the topic of “How is Society’s Drive for Everything “On Demand” Changing Healthcare?

Netflix, Amazon, Uber, DVR, smart watches, smart homes – Today’s devices, apps, and technologies are making nearly every facet of our lives available in an instant. One industry that has resisted full-scale turnover into an on-demand delivery model has been healthcare.

Whether unwilling or unable, there are many pieces of the healthcare ecosystem that – albeit, with technology – are delivered on the same timelines that have always been used.

However, we are beginning to see some change. Urgent care and retail clinics, telemedicine, and even a return to house calls are helping to usher in the move, but who’s next in healthcare’s push towards on demand? And who should push back?

Join the conversation during this week’s #HITsm chat.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are some ways you’ve already seen healthcare moving toward an on-demand model? #HITsm

T2: Regardless of current adoption, which segments of healthcare make the most sense to deliver on-demand? Which make the least sense? #HITsm

T3: How will the delivery of more healthcare on demand affect patient experience and expectations? #HITsm

T4: How does delivery of healthcare on demand affect population health? #HITsm

T5: How can healthcare organizations begin to change their mindset to deliver (more) healthcare on demand? #HITsm

Bonus: As the on demand healthcare landscape expands, what types of services (HCIT and beyond) do you expect to evolve alongside it? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
1/26 – Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management
Hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft

2/2 – TBD

2/9 – TBD

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management

Posted on January 16, 2018 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

Half of all U.S. adults, roughly 117 million people, have one or more chronic health conditions. 1 in 4 people have two or more chronic conditions. As a nation, we need some help addressing the chronic disease epidemic. Many patient portals today give patients access to pieces of their health information – lab results, for example – and some will flag upcoming appointments or refill a prescription, but where are the tools and the data in a portal to actually help patients manage chronic conditions, thereby improving their overall health and wellness? Sadly, many patient portals provide a very narrow view, with few opportunities to link data to actions to results in a way that closes the loop between patients and caregivers. Without a complete view of a patient’s health measures, wellness goals, and plans of action – and the tools to manage them – it is very difficult to connect health and wellness to address the whole patient.

Chronic disease management represents one of the best opportunities for a personal health record to link both wellness and healthcare together to affect positive health outcomes. What does it take to improve and maintain wellness? First, you need patient engagement. You need motivated patients who want to do a good job of actively tracking their conditions and working toward wellness goals. How do you convince a chronically ill patient to do this? Start by offering a tool that’s easy for them to track their data – complete with a workflow and user interface that makes it a breeze to enter and distill information at a glance and when they are on the go. Use technology similar to what patients use in their daily lives on their smart phones and laptops. Give patients tools to understand their health and take action based on how they are doing and what their health goals are! Provide a portal that allows the integration of popular wearable devices and lets the patient decide who should have access (Spouses? Caregivers?) to help them enter and manage their information.

Effectively managing chronic disease requires changing poor habits and forming good habits. Sometimes people need a gentle nudge or a push outside of the exam room. A platform that can send out reminders, gamify the experience, and even call a patient can go a long way in helping steer chronic disease patients in a more positive wellness direction. It’s not all about reminders, either. Texts and calls informing patients when they are doing a good job managing their daily wellness habits can also help.

Beyond helping patients, there’s an added benefit to coupling wellness capabilities with a PHR for providers – it has the ability to not only affect chronic disease factors, but to collect the data providers need to participate in the Quality Payment Program; the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). To quickly review, the Quality Payment Program allows clinicians to be rewarded financially for providing high-quality and high value care through Advanced Alternate Payment Models (APMs) or MIPS that are based on various measures. These measures can be integrated into the PHR, allowing physicians to track their patient populations, run reports, submit information to the Quality Payment Program, and receive merit payments.

What are your thoughts? Would you use a PHR to manage a chronic condition you are experiencing? Would you encourage your loved ones to use one? As a provider, how do you feel about a PHR making it easier for you to track MIPS/MACRA measures?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or @MedicaSoftLLC.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft  designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Driving Innovation in Healthcare Forward Requires New Ways of Thinking – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 9, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/12 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Constance Sjoquist (@CASjoquist), Chief Content Officer at HLTH.co on the topic of “Driving Innovation in Healthcare Forward Requires New Ways of Thinking.”

Traditional channels for ideating, learning, and sharing ideas, products and services that can improve healthcare outcomes, lower costs and make it easier on everyone involved are changing. Health plan members, budding consumers, both new and long-time patients, sponsor payers, employers, providers, medical device companies, pharma companies and start-ups and investors all have a vested interest. Not to mention the various federal and state-level government agencies that regulate all of these constituents.

So how can all of us – ALL OF US – work together to improve healthcare outcomes and lower costs – all while making it easier on all of us?

This chat raises and explores some ideas to help drive innovation in healthcare forward. We need new ways of thinking. Gigantic conferences and one-sided media movements are not cutting it.

Come join this exchange on how we can ALL participate and contribute in the drive to make healthcare more innovative.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:
T1: What are the primary reasons why the transformation of healthcare in the United States in 2018 and beyond is so difficult and challenging? #HITsm

T2: How can plan members, budding healthcare consumers, new & long-time patients, their sponsor payers, employers, providers, medical device companies, pharma companies & start-ups – help to reduce healthcare costs while improving quality of care? #HITsm

T3: In what ways can healthcare conferences, forums and media – traditional and digital – help to drive innovation in the health industry? And help to reduce healthcare costs while improving quality of care? #HITsm

T4: In what specific ways can disruptive technologies like #AI, #BigData, #MachineLearning, AR/VR, #3DPrinting, #PrecisionMedicine, Mobile & #IoT drive & support transformation of #healthcare? #HITsm (How’s that for too many hashtags!)

T5: Where can plan members, #healthcare consumers, new & long-time patients, their sponsor payers, employers, providers, medical device companies, pharma companies & start-ups look for examples of successful industry transformation? #HITsm

Bonus: What‘s one thing #healthcare conference organizers, the media that promote #healthcare & those that attend & support conferences help to move healthcare forward? What are they currently not doing? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
1/19 – How is society’s drive for everything “on demand” changing healthcare?
Hosted by Darin Vander Well (@DarinVanderWell) from @docutap

1/26 – Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management
Hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft

2/2 – TBD

2/9 – TBD

2/16 – TBD

2/23 – TBD

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 2 of 2)

Posted on January 4, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

The first part of this article set a general context for health IT in 2017 and started through the year with a review of interesting articles and studies. We’ll finish the review here.

A thoughtful article suggests a positive approach toward health care quality. The author stresses the value of organic change, although using data for accountability has value too.

An article extolling digital payments actually said more about the out-of-control complexity of the US reimbursement system. It may or not be coincidental that her article appeared one day after the CommonWell Health Alliance announced an API whose main purpose seems to be to facilitate payment and other data exchanges related to law and regulation.

A survey by KLAS asked health care providers what they want in connected apps. Most apps currently just display data from a health record.

A controlled study revived the concept of Health Information Exchanges as stand-alone institutions, examining the effects of emergency departments using one HIE in New York State.

In contrast to many leaders in the new Administration, Dr. Donald Rucker received positive comments upon acceding to the position of National Coordinator. More alarm was raised about the appointment of Scott Gottlieb as head of the FDA, but a later assessment gave him high marks for his first few months.

Before Dr. Gottlieb got there, the FDA was already loosening up. The 21st Century Cures Act instructed it to keep its hands off many health-related digital technologies. After kneecapping consumer access to genetic testing and then allowing it back into the ring in 2015, the FDA advanced consumer genetics another step this year with approval for 23andMe tests about risks for seven diseases. A close look at another DNA site’s privacy policy, meanwhile, warns that their use of data exploits loopholes in the laws and could end up hurting consumers. Another critique of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act has been written by Dr. Deborah Peel of Patient Privacy Rights.

Little noticed was a bill authorizing the FDA to be more flexible in its regulation of digital apps. Shortly after, the FDA announced its principles for approving digital apps, stressing good software development practices over clinical trials.

No improvement has been seen in the regard clinicians have for electronic records. Subjective reports condemned the notorious number of clicks required. A study showed they spend as much time on computer work as they do seeing patients. Another study found the ratio to be even worse. Shoving the job onto scribes may introduce inaccuracies.

The time spent might actually pay off if the resulting data could generate new treatments, increase personalized care, and lower costs. But the analytics that are critical to these advances have stumbled in health care institutions, in large part because of the perennial barrier of interoperability. But analytics are showing scattered successes, being used to:

Deloitte published a guide to implementing health care analytics. And finally, a clarion signal that analytics in health care has arrived: WIRED covers it.

A government cybersecurity report warns that health technology will likely soon contribute to the stream of breaches in health care.

Dr. Joseph Kvedar identified fruitful areas for applying digital technology to clinical research.

The Government Accountability Office, terror of many US bureaucracies, cam out with a report criticizing the sloppiness of quality measures at the VA.

A report by leaders of the SMART platform listed barriers to interoperability and the use of analytics to change health care.

To improve the lower outcomes seen by marginalized communities, the NIH is recruiting people from those populations to trust the government with their health data. A policy analyst calls on digital health companies to diversify their staff as well. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is also getting into the act.

Specific technologies

Digital apps are part of most modern health efforts, of course. A few articles focused on the apps themselves. One study found that digital apps can improve depression. Another found that an app can improve ADHD.

Lots of intriguing devices are being developed:

Remote monitoring and telehealth have also been in the news.

Natural language processing and voice interfaces are becoming a critical part of spreading health care:

Facial recognition is another potentially useful technology. It can replace passwords or devices to enable quick access to medical records.

Virtual reality and augmented reality seem to have some limited applications to health care. They are useful foremost in education, but also for pain management, physical therapy, and relaxation.

A number of articles hold out the tantalizing promise that interoperability headaches can be cured through blockchain, the newest hot application of cryptography. But one analysis warned that blockchain will be difficult and expensive to adopt.

3D printing can be used to produce models for training purposes as well as surgical tools and implants customized to the patient.

A number of other interesting companies in digital health can be found in a Fortune article.

We’ll end the year with a news item similar to one that began the article: serious good news about the ability of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) to save money. I would also like to mention three major articles of my own:

I hope this review of the year’s articles and studies in health IT has helped you recall key advances or challenges, and perhaps flagged some valuable topics for you to follow. 2018 will continue to be a year of adjustment to new reimbursement realities touched off by the tax bill, so health IT may once again languish somewhat.

What’s Trending in #HealthIT in 2018? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on January 3, 2018 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/5 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by John Lynn (@techguy), Founder of Healthcare Scene, the Healthcare IT Marketing and PR Conference, and Health IT Expo, on the topic of “What’s Trending in #HealthIT in 2018?

As we start 2018, we thought it would be appropriate for the #HITsm chat to take a short look back at 2017 and then to start looking forward to 2018. What are going to be the hot topics for 2018? What should we be doing to be prepared for what’s coming? What can we do to better improve healthcare in 2018? Plus, hopefully, you’ll also share some ideas for what you’d like to see from #HITsm in 2018 as well.

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: What was the biggest #HealthIT announcement, change, trend, etc in 2017 and why? #HITsm

T2: Which part of #HealthIT in 2018 are you most watching because you’re scared about what will happen? And Why? #HITsm

T3: Which part of #HealthIT in 2018 gets you most excited or will be most transformative? And Why? #HITsm

T4: What are you doing to prepare for what’s coming in #HealthIT in 2018? #HITsm

T5: What are some creative ideas/hosts/etc you’d like to see happen during #HITsm chats in 2018?

Bonus: What are your personal and/or career goals for 2018? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
1/12 – Driving Healthcare Innovation Forward Requires New Ways of Thinking
Hosted by Constance Sjoquist (@CASjoquist), Chief Content Officer at HLTH.co

1/19 – TBD
Hosted by Darin Vander Well (@DarinVanderWell) from @docutap

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 1 of 2)

Posted on January 2, 2018 I Written By

Andy Oram is an editor at O'Reilly Media, a highly respected book publisher and technology information provider. An employee of the company since 1992, Andy currently specializes in open source, software engineering, and health IT, but his editorial output has ranged from a legal guide covering intellectual property to a graphic novel about teenage hackers. His articles have appeared often on EMR & EHR and other blogs in the health IT space. Andy also writes often for O'Reilly's Radar site (http://oreilly.com/) and other publications on policy issues related to the Internet and on trends affecting technical innovation and its effects on society. Print publications where his work has appeared include The Economist, Communications of the ACM, Copyright World, the Journal of Information Technology & Politics, Vanguardia Dossier, and Internet Law and Business. Conferences where he has presented talks include O'Reilly's Open Source Convention, FISL (Brazil), FOSDEM, and DebConf.

This article provides a retrospective of 2017 in Health It–but a retrospective from an unusual perspective. I will highlight interesting articles I’ve read from the year as pointers to trends we should follow up on in the upcoming years.

Indubitably, 2017 is a unique year due to political events that threw the field of health care into wild uncertainty and speculation, exemplified most recently by the attempts to censor the use of precise and accurate language at the Centers for Disease Control (an act of political interference that could not be disguised even by those who tried to explain it away). Threats to replace the Affordable Care Act (another banned phrase) drove many institutions, which had formerly focused on improving communications or implementing risk sharing health care costs, to fall back into a lower level of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, obsessing over whether insurance payments would cease and patients would stop coming. News about health IT was also drowned out by more general health topics such as drug pricing, the opiate crisis, and revenue pressures that close hospitals.

Key issues

But let’s start our retrospective on an upbeat note. A brief study summary from January 4 reported lower costs for some surgeries when hospitals participated in a modest bundled payment program sponsored by CMS. This suggests that fee-for-value could be required more widely by payers, even in the absence of sophisticated analytics and care coordination. Because only a small percentage of clinicians choose bold risk-sharing reimbursement models, this news is important.

Next, a note on security. Maybe we should reprioritize clinicians’ defenses against the electronic record breaches we’ve been hearing so much about. An analysis found that the most common reason for an unauthorized release of data was an attack by an insiders (43 percent). This contrasts with 26.8 percent from outside intruders. (The article doesn’t say how many records were compromised by each breach, though–if they had, the importance of outside intruders might have skyrocketed.) In any case, watch your audit logs and don’t trust your employees.

In a bracing and rare moment of candor, President Obama and Vice President Biden (remember them?) sharply criticized current EHRs for lack of interoperability. Other articles during the year showed that the political leaders were on target, as interoperability–an odd health care term for what other industries call “data exchange”–continues to be just as elusive as ever. Only 30% of hospitals were able to exchange data (although the situation has probably improved since the 2015 data used in the study). Advances in interoperability were called “theoretical” and the problem was placed into larger issues of poor communication. The Harvard Business Review weighed in too, chiding doctors for spending so much money on systems that don’t communicate.

The controversy sharpened as fraud charges were brought against a major EHR vendor for gaming the certification for Meaningful Use. A couple months later, strangely, the ONC weakened its certification process and announced it would rely more on the vendors to police themselves.

A long article provided some historical background on the reasons for incompatibility among EHRS.

Patients, as always, are left out of the loop: an ONC report finds improvements but many remaining barriers to attempts by patients to obtain the medical records that are theirs by law. And should the manufacturers of medical devices share the data they collect with patients? One would think it an elementary right of patients, but guidance released this year by the FDA was remarkably timid, pointing out the benefits of sharing but leaving it as merely a recommendation and offering big loopholes.

The continued failure to exchange data–which frustrates all attempts to improve treatments and cut costs–has led to the question: do EHR vendors and clinicians deliberately introduce technical measures for “information blocking”? Many leading health IT experts say no. But a study found that explicit information blocking measures are real.

Failures in interoperability and patient engagement were cited in another paper.

And we can’t leave interoperability without acknowledging the hope provided by FHIR. A paper on the use of FHIR with the older Direct-based interoperability protocols was released.

We’ll make our way through the rest of year and look at some specific technologies in the next part of the article.

PHRs at Work

Posted on December 20, 2017 I Written By

The following is a guest blog by Monica Stout from MedicaSoft

We live in an age when our employers can offer a myriad of employee benefits – from pet insurance to wellness incentives. There is no shortage in what employers can offer as a benefit to their employees. Some employers, such as the U.S. Postal Service (USPS), are offering Personal Health Records (PHRs) to their employees as part of a package of health and wellness benefits.

Why offer a PHR to employees? PHRs can help people better gather all of their health information in one place – records from doctors and hospitals, lab results, data from personal devices (like FitBit) and apps, etc. They can help people understand what’s in their health records, manage their own health information, share it with people they trust, and plan for an emergency or for when future health needs arise.

All of this is done in one place that is completely under the employee’s control. Employee-owned PHRs can also allow patients to review their health information for accuracy and share information with trusted healthcare providers. Additionally, employer-hosted, patient-controlled PHRs can help employees or patients aggregate and consolidate the portals and health information they have spanning each doctor’s office, hospital, or health system they’ve visited so that all of their information resides in one place.

A common concern or barrier to employee adoption of PHRs is the fear that employers will look at an employee’s private health information. Fret not. Though it is natural to fear that your employer may look at your information, privacy safeguards are in place to prevent that from happening. PHRs like HealthCenter and USPS Health Connect let you control who sees your information, and provide monitoring to track all access.

What do you think? Would you like a PHR offered to you at work? How would it help you better manage your health or the health of your dependents or loved ones?

About Monica Stout
Monica is a HIT teleworker in Grand Rapids, Michigan by way of Washington, D.C., who has consulted at several government agencies, including the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). She’s currently the Marketing Director at MedicaSoft. Monica can be found on Twitter @MI_turnaround or LinkedIn.

About MedicaSoft
MedicaSoft designs, develops, delivers, and maintains EHR, PHR, and UHR software solutions and HISP services for healthcare providers and patients around the world. MedicaSoft is a proud sponsor of Healthcare Scene. For more information, visit www.medicasoft.us or connect with us on Twitter @MedicaSoftLLC, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Health IT Leaders Spending On Security, Not AI And Wearables

Posted on December 18, 2017 I Written By

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

While breakout technologies like wearables and AI are hot, health system leaders don’t seem to be that excited about adopting them, according to a new study which reached out to more than 20 US health systems.

Nine out of 10 health systems said they increased their spending on cybersecurity technology, according to research by the Center for Connected Medicine (CCM) in partnership with the Health Management Academy.

However, many other emerging technologies don’t seem to be making the cut. For example, despite the publicity it’s received, two-thirds of health IT leaders said using AI was a low or very low priority. It seems that they don’t see a business model for using it.

The same goes for many other technologies that fascinate analysts and editors. For example, while many observers which expect otherwise, less than a quarter of respondents (17%) were paying much attention to wearables or making any bets on mobile health apps (21%).

When it comes to telemedicine, hospitals and health systems noted that they were in a bind. Less than half said they receive reimbursement for virtual consults (39%) or remote monitoring (46%}. Things may resolve next year, however. Seventy-one percent of those not getting paid right now expect to be reimbursed for such care in 2018.

Despite all of this pessimism about the latest emerging technologies, health IT leaders were somewhat optimistic about the benefits of predictive analytics, with more than half of respondents using or planning to begin using genomic testing for personalized medicine. The study reported that many of these episodes will be focused on oncology, anesthesia and pharmacogenetics.

What should we make of these results? After all, many seem to fly in the face of predictions industry watchers have offered.

Well, for one thing, it’s good to see that hospitals and health systems are engaging in long-overdue beefing up of their security infrastructure. As we’ve noted here in the past, hospital spending on cybersecurity has been meager at best.

Another thing is that while a few innovative hospitals are taking patient-generated health data seriously, many others are taking a rather conservative position here. While nobody seems to disagree that such data will change the business, it seems many hospitals are waiting for somebody else to take the risks inherent in investing in any new data scheme.

Finally, it seems that we are seeing a critical mass of influential hospitals that expect good things from telemedicine going forward. We are already seeing some large, influential academic medical centers treat virtual care as a routine part of their service offerings and a way to minimize gaps in care.

All told, it seems that at the moment, study respondents are less interested in sexy new innovations than the VCs showering them with money. That being said, it looks like many of these emerging strategies might pay off in 2018. It should be an interesting year.

What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud? – #HITsm Chat Topic

Posted on December 12, 2017 I Written By

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com blog network which currently consists of 10 blogs containing over 8000 articles with John having written over 4000 of the articles himself. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 16 million times. John also manages Healthcare IT Central and Healthcare IT Today, the leading career Health IT job board and blog. John is co-founder of InfluentialNetworks.com and Physia.com. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can also be found on Twitter: @techguy and @ehrandhit and LinkedIn.

We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 12/15 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by David Fuller (@genkidave) on the topic of “What’s Keeping HealthIT From Soaring to the Cloud?.”

Premise and Private HealthIT architectures have ruled in healthcare and were unfortunately reinforced by the timing of ACA/HITECH. Infrastructure-as-a-Service, Platform-as-a-Service and other cloud-native approaches are revolutionizing all industries, and while for some somewhat valid reasons Healthcare has been slow to adopt the Cloud it’s now firmly ripe for transformation. So what are the forces keeping HealthIT from soaring to the Cloud? And how will cloud adoption in other industries and also within certain sectors of the healthcare landscape such as pharma and insurance give HealthIT the lift it needs to get off The Ground and into The Cloud?

Join us as we dive into this topic during this week’s #HITsm chat using the following questions.

Topics for This Week’s #HITsm Chat:

T1: How do premise and cloud-native HealthIT strategies differ? #HITsm

T2: What’s gained by moving HealthIT from premise-based designs to hosted, virtual and private cloud architectures? #HITsm

T3: What cyber-security concerns are keeping Cloud-native HealthIT from soaring? And how can these concerns be overcome? #HITsm

T4: Once HealthIT is truly in the Cloud what can HealthIT professionals see and do better than they can on ‘The Ground’? #HITsm

T5: What are the pros/cons of Cloud ‘dev-ops’ model and Ground ‘upgrade/migration’ IT deployment models? #HITsm

Bonus: How quickly will HealthIT professionals have to adopt pervasive Cloud-native HealthIT architectures? #HITsm

Upcoming #HITsm Chat Schedule
12/22 – Holiday Break

12/29 – Holiday Break

We look forward to learning from the #HITsm community! As always, let us know if you’d like to host a future #HITsm chat or if you know someone you think we should invite to host.

If you’re searching for the latest #HITsm chat, you can always find the latest #HITsm chat and schedule of chats here.